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InterCity125
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#41
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#41
(Original post by amazingtrade)
I would look into all the possibilies and look at the social backgrounds of my current work team. The last thing I would want to do is upset any other team members or make any other of my team feel threatrened. I wouldn't want an oxbridge boy coming in making other people worried that he/she may take over. The same applies to hiring graduates other none graduates for basic jobs.

However if my team were a mixed bag from different social backgrounds then I would have no problem hiring the Oxbridge graduate. Depending on the exact job if I had to weigh up who gets the job on a point score out of 100 I would probably add 5 for the oxbridge candidite. This largely depends on the job though. I would also do lots of research about how to hire people first to make sure the best candidate does get the job. I am not really qualified to make the above statement, Iam just saying what I would do if I was a boss.
This could get you into a whole load of trouble if the person found out about it and decided to cause problems.
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fishpaste
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#42
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A 3rd from cambridge is really hard work which requires you to be really good at your subject, i guess it suggests you shouldn't have been admitted though. I'm fairly sure someone with a 3rd at oxbridge would come top of their year if they were at say ... Man Met.
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ChemistBoy
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#43
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(Original post by fishpaste)
A 3rd from cambridge is really hard work which requires you to be really good at your subject, i guess it suggests you shouldn't have been admitted though. I'm fairly sure someone with a 3rd at oxbridge would come top of their year if they were at say ... Man Met.
Absolute rubbish, based on pure conjecture. 3rd year at any uni is very tough and in order to get a first you have to be very good at your subject, regardless of institution. Someone who got a third at cambridge is a waste of a place as far as I'm concerned and I certainly doubt they'd put the work in at another uni to get a good grade either.
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AT82
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#44
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#44
(Original post by InterCity125)
This could get you into a whole load of trouble if the person found out about it and decided to cause problems.
Not really, I am just checking to ensure they would fit in well with the team. I wouldn't. Would you employ a posh swot as a labourer who will be working with working class heavies? I certainly wouldn't.
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granddad_bob
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#45
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Absolute rubbish, based on pure conjecture. 3rd year at any uni is very tough and in order to get a first you have to be very good at your subject, regardless of institution. Someone who got a third at cambridge is a waste of a place as far as I'm concerned and I certainly doubt they'd put the work in at another uni to get a good grade either.
i think you're being a little harsh there, he didn't say any university was easy, after all. and certainly for his subject, he may well be correct. part III on the cambridge maths course is a lot harder than anything else expected from undergrads in the UK, and to even get there you need at least a high 2i from part II. the same could probable be said for natural science.
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InterCity125
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#46
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#46
(Original post by amazingtrade)
Not really, I am just checking to ensure they would fit in well with the team. I wouldn't. Would you employ a posh swot as a labourer who will be working with working class heavies? I certainly wouldn't.
An employment triburnal would say different. Why is what you are doing any different from Oxford refusing to accept a labour's son just beacuse the majority (c.85%) of students are middle class?
If you did this, I think you would get sued, tbh.
And yes, 'posh' people do do manual jobs - for example a graduate was working as a railway labourer when he got killed by a train a few years back!
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fishpaste
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#47
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Absolute rubbish, based on pure conjecture. 3rd year at any uni is very tough and in order to get a first you have to be very good at your subject, regardless of institution. Someone who got a third at cambridge is a waste of a place as far as I'm concerned and I certainly doubt they'd put the work in at another uni to get a good grade either.
okay yes it was a very crude, and i didn't think about how it would change by the third year. it was based on the fact i do actually do some work, and my DoS seems to think i may well get a cambridge third (which I can believe), combined with the fact that i have a friend doing (mostly) bsc maths at mmu, and their work is very basic in both content (alevel vector work) which wouldn't necessary indicate a slow course but it's not oriented around proof and rigour like linear algebra courses usually are.

Probably absolute rubbish because by the 3rd year things have probably changed. But I disagree that somebody getting a 3rd at cambridge wouldn't put the work in at another uni. Because I can only imagine it's quite possible to get a 3rd at cambridge whilst working pretty damn hard.
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fishpaste
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#48
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part III is something else completely, something of legends lol.
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ChemistBoy
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#49
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(Original post by fishpaste)
okay yes it was a very crude, and i didn't think about how it would change by the third year. it was based on the fact i do actually do some work, and my DoS seems to think i may well get a cambridge third (which I can believe), combined with the fact that i have a friend doing (mostly) bsc maths at mmu, and their work is very basic in both content (alevel vector work) which wouldn't necessary indicate a slow course but it's not oriented around proof and rigour like linear algebra courses usually are.

Probably absolute rubbish because by the 3rd year things have probably changed. But I disagree that somebody getting a 3rd at cambridge wouldn't put the work in at another uni. Because I can only imagine it's quite possible to get a 3rd at cambridge whilst working pretty damn hard.
If you are getting a 3rd and working hard you are wasting your time - i.e. your talent is not in the subject you are studying and/or the type of tuition you are receiving is not correct for you. Moving to another university might help you.

As for course content, Cambridge expect you to start running, whereas other universities (with lower expectations) ease you in and/or have to bring students up to the required level by ensuring basic knowledge. When I was in my first year at St Andrews the course was easy and just a recapitulation of A-level, by my fourth year it was a different story. A degree has to prepare you for further study, regardless of institution.

As for your Dean of Studies predicting what class of degree you will get at cambridge, tell him to sod off, sounds like an insult to me.
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fishpaste
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#50
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
If you are getting a 3rd and working hard you are wasting your time - i.e. your talent is not in the subject you are studying and/or the type of tuition you are receiving is not correct for you. Moving to another university might help you.

As for course content, Cambridge expect you to start running, whereas other universities (with lower expectations) ease you in and/or have to bring students up to the required level by ensuring basic knowledge. When I was in my first year at St Andrews the course was easy and just a recapitulation of A-level, by my fourth year it was a different story. A degree has to prepare you for further study, regardless of institution.

As for your Dean of Studies predicting what class of degree you will get at cambridge, tell him to sod off, sounds like an insult to me.
but there are different degrees of working hard. i spend say 30 hours on example sheets per week, and 14 hours of lectures/supervisions per week, and this seems like working pretty hard to me. but for the person who lives upstairs, it would be travesty, as he is committed to at least 10 hours a day in the library, outside of lectures and supers. (not an exaggeration). My DoS is urging me to do more work to get upto 2.1, (though admittedly he doesn't expect 12/13 hours a day I suspect).

Then MMU spend alot of time getting their students upto speed because I'm looking at second term, second year work and it's good stuff but couldn't be described as demanding.

he was required to predict me a class as he also supervises for algebra, and so a prediction is required by camcors.
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ChemistBoy
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#51
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(Original post by fishpaste)
but there are different degrees of working hard. i spend say 30 hours on example sheets per week, and 14 hours of lectures/supervisions per week, and this seems like working pretty hard to me. but for the person who lives upstairs, it would be travesty, as he is committed to at least 10 hours a day in the library, outside of lectures and supers. (not an exaggeration). My DoS is urging me to do more work to get upto 2.1, (though admittedly he doesn't expect 12/13 hours a day I suspect).
Working hard is not directly correlated to how much time you spend working.
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fishpaste
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#52
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Working hard is not directly correlated to how much time you spend working.
but it roughly is, if you're sitting in a library on your own, you're probably working the same as somebody else sitting in a library on their own.
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ChemistBoy
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#53
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#53
(Original post by fishpaste)
but it roughly is, if you're sitting in a library on your own, you're probably working the same as somebody else sitting in a library on their own.
Not in my experience. I know plenty of people who put in a lot more hours than me, but didn't do as well.
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ChemistBoy
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#54
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Just been on the MMU website. According to their course guide linear algebra is covered in first year, not second on their BSc course - what course is your friend doing?
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fishpaste
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#55
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Not in my experience. I know plenty of people who put in a lot more hours than me, but didn't do as well.
they were probably thicker than you

let me assure you that both me and the guy upstairs work the same when we work. and as far as I can tell, I could handle the MMU course with my current propensity to work pretty well. i don't care that much to prove my assertion with statistical evidence, it's just a "with what I've seen ... I reckon .." assertion.
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fishpaste
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#56
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Just been on the MMU website. According to their course guide linear algebra is covered in first year, not second on their BSc course - what course is your friend doing?
they're a first year doing bsc maths. the second year stuff i was looking at was applied, though there was also some linear algebra there too, looking at cartesian coordinates and their transformations under various matrices.
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ChemistBoy
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#57
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#57
(Original post by fishpaste)
they were probably thicker than you
No doubt...

let me assure you that both me and the guy upstairs work the same when we work. and as far as I can tell, I could handle the MMU course with my current propensity to work pretty well. i don't care that much to prove my assertion with statistical evidence, it's just a "with what I've seen ... I reckon .." assertion.
Then why are you doing so badly at Cambridge? I know a great many people who have study for degrees from Cambridge and I've never met one who suggest that the standard gap is even half as wide as you are insinuating.
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ChemistBoy
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#58
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(Original post by fishpaste)
they're a first year doing bsc maths. the second year stuff i was looking at was applied, though there was also some linear algebra there too, looking at cartesian coordinates and their transformations under various matrices.
That's part of the modelling section I presume, the course appears to be very computationally based.
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fishpaste
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#59
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Then why are you doing so badly at Cambridge? I know a great many people who have study for degrees from Cambridge and I've never met one who suggest that the standard gap is even half as wide as you are insinuating.
I think the main reason I'm struggling is:-
I lack a natural intuition for alot of the more advanced linear algebra.
I don't spend the time on it which I'm expected to.
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fishpaste
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#60
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(Original post by ChemistBoy)
That's part of the modelling section I presume, the course appears to be very computationally based.
it has a natural application to computer graphics, so I imagine so yes.
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