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Best Medicine route

I want to study medicine to become a doctor. But I didn't get a medicine offer. So my current options are to either do biomed at Kings or to study abroad (probably Bulgaria). What would be the best option?
(edited 1 year ago)
Unless you are planning on practicing medicine in Bulgaria, I imagine that the best option would be a gap year and reapplying to undergrad med in the UK.
Reply 2
I have already had a gap year and was unsuccessful the second time
Reply 3
Original post by SSR1122
I want to study medicine to become a doctor. But I didn't get a medicine offer. So my current options are to either do biomed at Kings or to study abroad (probably Bulgaria). What would be the best option?

I would say either find the weaknesses in your application and reapply or study medicine in Bulgaria if medicine is really what you want to do, did you receive any interview offers?
Reply 4
Original post by Nomi980
I would say either find the weaknesses in your application and reapply or study medicine in Bulgaria if medicine is really what you want to do, did you receive any interview offers?

I received an interview at kent but got rejected. I got an AAB at a levels, and medicine is what i really want to do
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by SSR1122
I received an interview at kent but got rejected. I got an AAB at a levels

You can still be successful after multiple gap years. Maybe you could resit the A level you got a B in and reapply? GEM is wayyy more competitive than 'school leaver' entry for medicine so you would have to be prepared to pay for your biomed degree, spend 3 years studying a subject you don't want and then take multiple gap years for GEM. Studying abroad may not be a bad option but I would still say the best option is to reapply
Just do another gap year, improve your application, and apply again.

You should definitely not do a degree you don't want to do like biomedical sciences if your aim is to become a doctor - graduate entry medicine (and even standard entry medicine for graduates) is considerably more competitive than standard entry medicine for school leavers, and so you should assume if you do another degree you won't necessarily ever get into medicine.

Doing a degree in Europe is an option but has caveats, namely cost, and the fact that while there is no issue in principle starting work in the UK and registering with the GMC etc, European medical degrees often have a different model to the UK - where essentially they let anyone in, but very few progress through the whole degree due to only a certain number progressing through each stage. Essentially they shift the barrier to entry from before the degree to during it - so you may end up studying for 3 years then be unable to continue and be really screwed as you won't be able to transfer to a UK medical school, will be in the same boat as doing another degree, and will have spent more time and money on it to boot.

It doesn't really matter if you even need to take 3 or 4 gap years to reapply and improve your application, in the scope of a 40+ year career that's really nothing...although obviously if you do need to take more than 3 years you may be expected by unis to undertake some more recent study.

Of course, you do need to assess why you've been unsuccessful and determine if these are issues you can improve on (and then, work specifically on those). No point reapplying and just doing the same thing every year with no change!
Original post by bea_murray0
You can still be successful after multiple gap years. Maybe you could resit the A level you got a B in and reapply? GEM is wayyy more competitive than 'school leaver' entry for medicine so you would have to be prepared to pay for your biomed degree, spend 3 years studying a subject you don't want and then take multiple gap years for GEM. Studying abroad may not be a bad option but I would still say the best option is to reapply

PRSOM :smile:
Reply 8
Original post by artful_lounger
Just do another gap year, improve your application, and apply again.

You should definitely not do a degree you don't want to do like biomedical sciences if your aim is to become a doctor - graduate entry medicine (and even standard entry medicine for graduates) is considerably more competitive than standard entry medicine for school leavers, and so you should assume if you do another degree you won't necessarily ever get into medicine.

Doing a degree in Europe is an option but has caveats, namely cost, and the fact that while there is no issue in principle starting work in the UK and registering with the GMC etc, European medical degrees often have a different model to the UK - where essentially they let anyone in, but very few progress through the whole degree due to only a certain number progressing through each stage. Essentially they shift the barrier to entry from before the degree to during it - so you may end up studying for 3 years then be unable to continue and be really screwed as you won't be able to transfer to a UK medical school, will be in the same boat as doing another degree, and will have spent more time and money on it to boot.

It doesn't really matter if you even need to take 3 or 4 gap years to reapply and improve your application, in the scope of a 40+ year career that's really nothing...although obviously if you do need to take more than 3 years you may be expected by unis to undertake some more recent study.

Of course, you do need to assess why you've been unsuccessful and determine if these are issues you can improve on (and then, work specifically on those). No point reapplying and just doing the same thing every year with no change!

Thank you so much for the help and I might consider a gap year and improving my application, but I have one more question. I've heard from a surgeon that people who study abroad and come back to the UK to work find it harder to get into residency training. Is that true?
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by SSR1122
Thank you so much for the help and I might consider a gap year and improving my application, but I have one more question. I've heard from a surgeon that people who study abroad and come back to the UK to work find it harder to get into residency training. Is that true?

can probably answer this best, however as far as I'm aware once you are registered with the GMC it doesn't matter. I mean at the very least even for UK graduates where you go to medical school doesn't factor into medical recruitment, which is blinded to your medical school, so in principle it won't make a difference.
Original post by SSR1122
Thank you so much for the help and I might consider a gap year and improving my application, but I have one more question. I've heard from a surgeon that people who study abroad and come back to the UK to work find it harder to get into residency training. Is that true?

We call it foundation training instead of residence training in the uk.
Reply 11
Original post by hungrysalamander
We call it foundation training instead of residence training in the uk.

Sorry I meant the speciality training, is it hard to get into that if you study abroad?
Original post by SSR1122
I want to study medicine to become a doctor. But I didn't get a medicine offer. So my current options are to either do biomed at Kings or to study abroad (probably Bulgaria). What would be the best option?

You could apply to Queen Mary University London in Malta, it's a uk degree from QMUL which means you can directly apply for F1 and are classed as a UK Medical Grad but you need to fund it yourself.
Reply 13
Original post by jobojobojoboxxx
You could apply to Queen Mary University London in Malta, it's a uk degree from QMUL which means you can directly apply for F1 and are classed as a UK Medical Grad but you need to fund it yourself.

I looked into it but you need AAA. I have an AAB
Original post by SSR1122
I looked into it but you need AAA. I have an AAB

Oh sorry, it must have changed this year, it was always previously AAB.
Reply 15
Original post by jobojobojoboxxx
Oh sorry, it must have changed this year, it was always previously AAB.

No problem, thanks for the suggestion anyway
Original post by SSR1122
Sorry I meant the speciality training, is it hard to get into that if you study abroad?

the short answer is no, longer answer IMO is that it probably does make it harder - and also will depend on the specialty. As it's an equal competition and the standardized nature of the application means that where you went to medical school (even different country) has no bearing on selection for specialty training. However, for those who have already been in the UK system - the requirements for specialty training are often embedded into the progression criteria through early training like foundation - for example audits/research/taster weeks/conferences/courses are either mandatory or encouraged quite aggressively which will obviously put the UK doctors at an advantage when it comes to specialty training application.

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