Critique my 16 marker on the working memory model

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OVLD68
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#1
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#1
Hey, can someone read and critique my 16 marker for the working memory model. It took me 18 minutes to complete. I'm not entirely sure I'm actually answering the question effectively so I'm looking for any help. Let me know what you think this may get out of 16 and what I can improve on.

Title:
Outline and evaluate the working memory model (16 marks)

The working memory model was devised by Baddeley and Hitch. It says that the short term memory store in the multi store model is an active store with 4 subcomponents. One of the sub components of the working memory model is the phonological loop. The phonological loop is responsible for remembering the order of information, auditory information needed for an ongoing task and words read from a page (subvocal rehearsal). It has 2 subcomponents, the primary acoustic store, which stores all auditory information from our surroundings for around 1-2 seconds. The second subcomponent is the articulatory proces, which if information is needed for working memory, it transfers from the primary acoustic store to the articulatory process. The articulatory process had a duration of how many words someone can say in 2 seconds (why someone can remember a list of short words better then a list of long words; word length effect). Another component of the working memory model is the visuospatial sketchpad. This stores visual and spatial information needed for an ongoing task and has 2 subcompnetns. The innerscribe holdall spatial information needed for an ongoing task and the visual cache stores all visual information needed for an ongoing task. Another component is the episodic buffer. This is a multimodal store. It combines information from all 5 senses, and thoughts and feelings, to create a memory of a whole event of experience. The final component of the working memory model is the central executive. The central executive is responsible for allocating attention between stores. According to Baddeley and Hitch, it isn't a store. The central executive can become overloaded if it receives too much information.


A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from brain imaging studies. Braver conducted Bain scans on participnts while they were completing certain tasks. Braver found that participants completing visual tasks, the occipital lobe was active, participants completing verbal tasks, the temporal lobe was active, and participants completing tasks that required attention to be allocated across stores, the frontal cortex was active. This is significant as it not only provides empirical evidence, but it also suggests that multiple parts of the brain are active when completing certain tasks, supporting the Working memory model.

A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from dual tasks procedures. Baddeley and Gathercole conducted a dual task procedure. One group of participants completed two visual tasks while one group completed one verbal and one visual task. According to the multistore modal, the participants should find it equally as challenging. According to the working memory model however, the group completing 2 visual tasks should find it harder as their visuospatial sketchpad is more likely to be overloaded. They found that the group completing 2 visual tasks made more mistakes then the other group. This is significant as it suggests that working memory can become overloaded, supporting the existence of the central executive.

A weakness of the multi store model is that central executive in unfalsifiable. For example, if someone completes a dual task procedure correctly, its because the central executive allocated correctly. If someone completes a dual task procedure incorrectly, its because the central executive became overloaded. Every outcome provides existence for the central executive. This is significant as it means the central executive can't be proved face, meaning it isn't a testable scientific concept and as a result means the working memory model is unscientific.

A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from case studies. Patient KF had brain damage. KF was unable to retain verbal information, but was still able to retain visual information. This is significant as it not only provides existence for the phonological loop and the visuospatial sketchpad, but it also means each working memory store can be damage independently, suggesting it isn't localised to one part of the brain. This supports the working memory model. However, as it was a case study we can't be sure this will generalise to other people.
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userxxx
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#2
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#2
Hey, I think your essay is great! But remember the breakdown of a 16 marker is 6 marks for AO1 to outline and 10 for evaluating - you defiantly do not need 4 evaluation point you could do 2-3 maximum to receive full marks and could probably even shorten the AO1 more but if you have time and can recall all of this information in the exam I do not see why this response would not be a level 4 response
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astudent..
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#3
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(Original post by OVLD68)
Hey, can someone read and critique my 16 marker for the working memory model. It took me 18 minutes to complete. I'm not entirely sure I'm actually answering the question effectively so I'm looking for any help. Let me know what you think this may get out of 16 and what I can improve on.

Title:
Outline and evaluate the working memory model (16 marks)

The working memory model was devised by Baddeley and Hitch. It says that the short term memory store in the multi store model is an active store with 4 subcomponents. One of the sub components of the working memory model is the phonological loop. The phonological loop is responsible for remembering the order of information, auditory information needed for an ongoing task and words read from a page (subvocal rehearsal). It has 2 subcomponents, the primary acoustic store, which stores all auditory information from our surroundings for around 1-2 seconds. The second subcomponent is the articulatory proces, which if information is needed for working memory, it transfers from the primary acoustic store to the articulatory process. The articulatory process had a duration of how many words someone can say in 2 seconds (why someone can remember a list of short words better then a list of long words; word length effect). Another component of the working memory model is the visuospatial sketchpad. This stores visual and spatial information needed for an ongoing task and has 2 subcompnetns. The innerscribe holdall spatial information needed for an ongoing task and the visual cache stores all visual information needed for an ongoing task. Another component is the episodic buffer. This is a multimodal store. It combines information from all 5 senses, and thoughts and feelings, to create a memory of a whole event of experience. The final component of the working memory model is the central executive. The central executive is responsible for allocating attention between stores. According to Baddeley and Hitch, it isn't a store. The central executive can become overloaded if it receives too much information.


A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from brain imaging studies. Braver conducted Bain scans on participnts while they were completing certain tasks. Braver found that participants completing visual tasks, the occipital lobe was active, participants completing verbal tasks, the temporal lobe was active, and participants completing tasks that required attention to be allocated across stores, the frontal cortex was active. This is significant as it not only provides empirical evidence, but it also suggests that multiple parts of the brain are active when completing certain tasks, supporting the Working memory model.

A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from dual tasks procedures. Baddeley and Gathercole conducted a dual task procedure. One group of participants completed two visual tasks while one group completed one verbal and one visual task. According to the multistore modal, the participants should find it equally as challenging. According to the working memory model however, the group completing 2 visual tasks should find it harder as their visuospatial sketchpad is more likely to be overloaded. They found that the group completing 2 visual tasks made more mistakes then the other group. This is significant as it suggests that working memory can become overloaded, supporting the existence of the central executive.

A weakness of the multi store model is that central executive in unfalsifiable. For example, if someone completes a dual task procedure correctly, its because the central executive allocated correctly. If someone completes a dual task procedure incorrectly, its because the central executive became overloaded. Every outcome provides existence for the central executive. This is significant as it means the central executive can't be proved face, meaning it isn't a testable scientific concept and as a result means the working memory model is unscientific.

A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from case studies. Patient KF had brain damage. KF was unable to retain verbal information, but was still able to retain visual information. This is significant as it not only provides existence for the phonological loop and the visuospatial sketchpad, but it also means each working memory store can be damage independently, suggesting it isn't localised to one part of the brain. This supports the working memory model. However, as it was a case study we can't be sure this will generalise to other people.
for the paragraph about dual tasks, you should maybe say that the VSS capacity is limited which is why the tasks are harder. It basically is the same thing but is just better terminology x
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jakewatkins22
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#4
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(Original post by OVLD68)
Hey, can someone read and critique my 16 marker for the working memory model. It took me 18 minutes to complete. I'm not entirely sure I'm actually answering the question effectively so I'm looking for any help. Let me know what you think this may get out of 16 and what I can improve on.

Title:
Outline and evaluate the working memory model (16 marks)

The working memory model was devised by Baddeley and Hitch. It says that the short term memory store in the multi store model is an active store with 4 subcomponents. One of the sub components of the working memory model is the phonological loop. The phonological loop is responsible for remembering the order of information, auditory information needed for an ongoing task and words read from a page (subvocal rehearsal). It has 2 subcomponents, the primary acoustic store, which stores all auditory information from our surroundings for around 1-2 seconds. The second subcomponent is the articulatory proces, which if information is needed for working memory, it transfers from the primary acoustic store to the articulatory process. The articulatory process had a duration of how many words someone can say in 2 seconds (why someone can remember a list of short words better then a list of long words; word length effect). Another component of the working memory model is the visuospatial sketchpad. This stores visual and spatial information needed for an ongoing task and has 2 subcompnetns. The innerscribe holdall spatial information needed for an ongoing task and the visual cache stores all visual information needed for an ongoing task. Another component is the episodic buffer. This is a multimodal store. It combines information from all 5 senses, and thoughts and feelings, to create a memory of a whole event of experience. The final component of the working memory model is the central executive. The central executive is responsible for allocating attention between stores. According to Baddeley and Hitch, it isn't a store. The central executive can become overloaded if it receives too much information.


A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from brain imaging studies. Braver conducted Bain scans on participnts while they were completing certain tasks. Braver found that participants completing visual tasks, the occipital lobe was active, participants completing verbal tasks, the temporal lobe was active, and participants completing tasks that required attention to be allocated across stores, the frontal cortex was active. This is significant as it not only provides empirical evidence, but it also suggests that multiple parts of the brain are active when completing certain tasks, supporting the Working memory model.

A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from dual tasks procedures. Baddeley and Gathercole conducted a dual task procedure. One group of participants completed two visual tasks while one group completed one verbal and one visual task. According to the multistore modal, the participants should find it equally as challenging. According to the working memory model however, the group completing 2 visual tasks should find it harder as their visuospatial sketchpad is more likely to be overloaded. They found that the group completing 2 visual tasks made more mistakes then the other group. This is significant as it suggests that working memory can become overloaded, supporting the existence of the central executive.

A weakness of the multi store model is that central executive in unfalsifiable. For example, if someone completes a dual task procedure correctly, its because the central executive allocated correctly. If someone completes a dual task procedure incorrectly, its because the central executive became overloaded. Every outcome provides existence for the central executive. This is significant as it means the central executive can't be proved face, meaning it isn't a testable scientific concept and as a result means the working memory model is unscientific.

A strength of the working memory model is that it receives support from case studies. Patient KF had brain damage. KF was unable to retain verbal information, but was still able to retain visual information. This is significant as it not only provides existence for the phonological loop and the visuospatial sketchpad, but it also means each working memory store can be damage independently, suggesting it isn't localised to one part of the brain. This supports the working memory model. However, as it was a case study we can't be sure this will generalise to other people.
what exam board are you? i’m aqa but i feel as if the way you worded some things you may be on a diff exam board
i would talk about coding and capacity for all stores. all the stores have a limited capacity, and talk about how information is coded visually in the VSS and coded acoustically in the PL
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OVLD68
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#5
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(Original post by jakewatkins22)
what exam board are you? i’m aqa but i feel as if the way you worded some things you may be on a diff exam board
i would talk about coding and capacity for all stores. all the stores have a limited capacity, and talk about how information is coded visually in the VSS and coded acoustically in the PL
Hi, I just want to say I really appreciate all of the feedback on my posts. I am also AQA, so let me know what differs from what you've been taught.
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