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    I know you shouldn't trust league tables fully and take them with a pinch of salt, but the thing I was most surprised was that Law wasn't a Top 15 starting graduate salary?! The reason I was surprised is that I always see posts on here that Law is a high-paying degree, excellent graduate jobs prospects etc, but doesn't this contradict this? Especially seeing that Law is one of the most competitive course to get into. Here's the link:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/multime...-2_354192a.gif
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    I think law doesn't have a brilliant starting salary but then grows quite quickly and to very high figures.
    It's possible they only took into account starting salaries when compiling the list. Not sure!

    Edit: Oh yeah, clicked link, it's only starting salaries
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    I know you shouldn't trust league tables fully and take them with a pinch of salt, but the thing I was most surprised was that Law wasn't starting graduate salary?! The reason I was surprised is I always see posts on here that Law is a high-paying degree, excellent graduate jobs prospects etc, but doesn't this contradict this, especially that Law is one of the most competitive course to get into. Here's the link:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/multime...-2_354192a.gif
    I thought that was relatively well known. I remember seeing a whole article on this including feedback from actual graduates from top institutions saying they had a lot of trouble pursuing anything meaningful after graduation. Students from mid range to low institutions said they didn't see themselves being employed and/or having a good salary in the near future.

    It's a competitive course, but the employment factor is even more competitive. If you've got a degree from a low ranked institution, you're pretty much screwed.
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    Oh look economics is in the top5.

    Thanks for making my day, that's a good chap.

    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work. I wouldn't treat a law graduate as anything special if I was an employer given they haven't proven any numeracy or anything interesting.

    To be fair, you'd think law was better then land&property management though. Lawyers are well paid, but how many law graduates really go into it?
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    Bear in mind they take the average of people in work six months after graduation.

    Those with law degrees wanting to work as solicitors/barristers will be going straight into a training contract, which during the LPC year pays peanuts. It's only 3-5 years after graduation that the earning potential rockets.

    Starting salary is the most pointless method of ranking around - hence why social work is so high up. It is unfortunately not a good investment in the long run, however.
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    Starting salaries aren't great for lawyers, although I think on the solicitor side starting salaries can be pretty good, but then you have to balance that with barristers - there are quite a few things you should consider: something like one quater of applicants for pupillage are sucessful; a sucessful pupillage doesn't necessarily mean you will gain a tenancy; barristers have no set salary - it is dependant on how much work they can get and work that work is; barristers are not paid upfront.

    (Original post by RyanT)
    Oh look economics is in the top5.

    Thanks for making my day, that's a good chap.

    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work. I wouldn't treat a law graduate as anything special if I was an employer given they haven't proven any numeracy or anything interesting.

    To be fair, you'd think law was better then land&property management though. Lawyers are well paid, but how many law graduates really go into it?
    Oookay then.
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Bear in mind they take the average of people in work six months after graduation.

    Those with law degrees wanting to work as solicitors/barristers will be going straight into a training contract, which during the LPC year pays peanuts. It's only 3-5 years after graduation that the earning potential rockets.

    Starting salary is the most pointless method of ranking around - hence why social work is so high up. It is unfortunately not a good investment in the long run, however.
    :ditto:

    the average 6 months after is the important factor - people with a medicine degree are garanteed a job for the first two years after they graduate so they have a 100% employent rate, probably why they come out top
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Bear in mind they take the average of people in work six months after graduation.

    Those with law degrees wanting to work as solicitors/barristers will be going straight into a training contract, which during the LPC year pays peanuts. It's only 3-5 years after graduation that the earning potential rockets.

    Starting salary is the most pointless method of ranking around - hence why social work is so high up. It is unfortunately not a good investment in the long run, however.
    Just because Law doesn't fit the bill? Please. It's a pretty good indicator of what's to come in most cases. Take Medicine for example, number one on the list and pays pretty well throughout your career.
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Bear in mind they take the average of people in work six months after graduation.
    Ah I didn't realise this! That is the answer then - 6 months after graduating, no law student will be earning. Those wanting to be lawyers will be either on the LPC or the BVC.
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    (Original post by FTC199)
    :ditto:

    the average 6 months after is the important factor - people with a medicine degree are garanteed a job for the first two years after they graduate so they have a 100% employent rate, probably why they come out top
    Well, the table is a ranking of starting salaries and nothing more. It doesn't matter what the factors are, that's how it pans out. I don't see why this table is being extrapolated to five years after graduation and so on.
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    the reason is that the number of law graduates has increased hugely in the last decade but the number of high paying law jobs has not. It's pretty well known that there is a huge glut of law graduates who don't get law related jobs after uni. and tbh if you're not a lawyer the usefulness of law is pretty limited.
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    Just because Law doesn't fit the bill? Please. It's a pretty good indicator of what's to come in most cases. Take Medicine for example, number one on the list and pays pretty well throughout your career.
    Simply because it happens to be a good indicator at point x and point y for medicine does not imply casuation.

    I maintain it's a bad method of indicating overall earnings potential, and not just for law.

    However, this thread is about law specifically, so I answered it in that context. The explanation to the OP's question is that it's not an accurate reflection of long-term earnings potential in many cases. Why the condescension? :dontknow:
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    (Original post by kklol)
    the reason is that the number of law graduates has increased hugely in the last decade but the number of high paying law jobs has not. It's pretty well known that there is a huge glut of law graduates who don't get law related jobs after uni. and tbh if you're not a lawyer the usefulness of law is pretty limited.
    Exactly.
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    (Original post by kklol)
    and tbh if you're not a lawyer the usefulness of law is pretty limited.
    I hope some people with actual knowledge of legal careers start posting on here soon.
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    (Original post by kklol)
    the reason is that the number of law graduates has increased hugely in the last decade but the number of high paying law jobs has not. It's pretty well known that there is a huge glut of law graduates who don't get law related jobs after uni.
    This is also true enough. I've come across a few in non-specific graduate jobs, and a few with not-good degrees working in retail etc. I think part of the problem with law is that some people take law becuase they see pound signs, and don't realise how competitive those well-paying jobs are. Consequently, they end up doing worse in the degree than they might have done if they took something that interested them more, and completely count themselves out of that jobs market.
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    (Original post by IlexAquifolium)
    Bear in mind they take the average of people in work six months after graduation.

    Those with law degrees wanting to work as solicitors/barristers will be going straight into a training contract, which during the LPC year pays peanuts. It's only 3-5 years after graduation that the earning potential rockets.

    Starting salary is the most pointless method of ranking around - hence why social work is so high up. It is unfortunately not a good investment in the long run, however.
    :ditto:

    The lady knows her stuff

    Sure, if you go into the city then you're going to have a larger starting salary but most law grads, when doing their training contract (particularly in regional firms) are only on about 15k, I think? This is below the average grad salary.

    It's an area with great salary potential, of course, but that doesn't mean it has a good starting salary.
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    I think the average salary for a trainee lawyer is around £19,000, but does increase very rapidly
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    Physics is #6?
    I'm happy now. Thanks for making my day ^_^
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    I hope some people with actual knowledge of legal careers start posting on here soon.
    Well, I've moved it to the law subforum (as it seems a more appropritate place).

    But the law subforum seems quiet recently. Lately, on all the threads I've contributed too, they are nowhere to be seen. Do I scare them off?

    Where are they? :p:
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    (Original post by River85)
    Well, I've moved it to the law subforum (as it seems a more appropritate place).

    But the law subforum seems quiet recently. Lately, on all the threads I've contributed too, they are nowhere to be seen. Do I scare them off?

    Where are they? :p:
    Glad you've moved it; should save some ignorant comments. :yep:

    Aww I'll stay and help where I can. :p:
 
 
 
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