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    (Original post by im so academic)
    I know you shouldn't trust league tables fully and take them with a pinch of salt, but the thing I was most surprised was that Law wasn't a Top 15 starting graduate salary?! The reason I was surprised is that I always see posts on here that Law is a high-paying degree, excellent graduate jobs prospects etc, but doesn't this contradict this? Especially seeing that Law is one of the most competitive course to get into. Here's the link:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/multime...-2_354192a.gif

    Hey,
    Do u have the actual link to the article plz?

    Thanks
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    *************. Where's Computing?
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    Oh look economics is in the top5.

    Thanks for making my day, that's a good chap.

    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work. I wouldn't treat a law graduate as anything special if I was an employer given they haven't proven any numeracy or anything interesting.

    To be fair, you'd think law was better then land&property management though. Lawyers are well paid, but how many law graduates really go into it?
    Now that was just a bunch of bull****. If it isn't that hard then why is it so difficult to get a place at a good uni and why are unis so selective, even those that aren't so good for the subject have high entry requirements. A law degree is probably up there with with the toughest when it comes to degrees at uni.


    And PS ....right now its better to be a lawyer (http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5109139.ece) than an economist....haha
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    Exactly.
    then you clearly have no idea what you're talking about. anyone graduating from law must first take the BVC or the LPC, which will be why "law graduates" (not LPC/BVC graduates) are not ranked highly on the table -- starting salary at a low-end firm is give or take 17-20k (for a solicitor), my sister's was 35k during her training contract.

    secondly, a law degree is not 'worthless' considering you cover law across several sectors e.g. commercial, industry, public sector, clerical -- there's a wide variety of jobs available. alot of graduates go in to journalism, politics, the financial and public sectors (as with any other degree, there are a wide amount of jobs you can apply for).
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    (Original post by wizz_kid)
    Hey,
    Do u have the actual link to the article plz?

    Thanks
    Here it is:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...cle4165690.ece

    Also, thanks for your replies everyone!
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    (Original post by Denny Crane)

    And PS ....right now its better to be a lawyer (http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle5109139.ece) than an economist....haha
    SHhhhhh!!!:p:
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work.
    Lol, what?!
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    SHhhhhh!!!:p:
    :confused:
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    (Original post by Denny Crane)
    :confused:
    People studying economics are shifting to law as we're doing better than them in the credit crunch. Its competitive enough for me without them making it harder!
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    Why does the money matter? I thought law was like medicine, not a job but a vocation. You know, to help people. A person's salary is not proportional to their ability to help people through their job.
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    (Original post by ExDeusVenitBritannia)
    Why does the money matter? I thought law was like medicine, not a job but a vocation. You know, to help people. A person's salary is not proportional to their ability to help people through their job.
    This is what was pointed out in the Pro Bono LawWorks conference last weekend. It is a shame in a way.
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    People studying economics are shifting to law as we're doing better than them in the credit crunch. Its competitive enough for me without them making it harder!
    HAHA... I figured.. I just wanted to find out if your shhhhing me because you argree or disagree, the guy thought law was pointless so i just couldn't help but rub it in.
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    (Original post by Denny Crane)
    HAHA... I figured.. I just wanted to find out if your shhhhing me because you argree or disagree, the guy thought law was pointless so i just couldn't help but rub it in.
    Of course I agree, I study law!
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    It does sometimes depend on what field of law you go into. Corporate, family and media law, for example, involve a very good amount of money. Criminal law, surprisingly, doesn't involve very good salaries at all.
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work. I wouldn't treat a law graduate as anything special if I was an employer given they haven't proven any numeracy or anything interesting.
    And this is based on what... the fact that you don't study it and therefore isn't anywhere near a hard enough league for you?
    --

    the starting salary for law is likely lower than expected because junior solicitors and trainees etc earn very little - it definitley rises in the long run though!
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    Oh look economics is in the top5.

    Thanks for making my day, that's a good chap.

    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work. I wouldn't treat a law graduate as anything special if I was an employer given they haven't proven any numeracy or anything interesting.

    To be fair, you'd think law was better then land&property management though. Lawyers are well paid, but how many law graduates really go into it?
    Daft thing to say. To be a good lawyer requires an extremely impressive analytically persuasive mind. Your job is to twist and turn facts and figures in order to make others succumb to your way of thinking. Someone else's liberty is in your hands. It also involves a mighty amount of research into past cases and previous statutes. Plus, a lawyer will usually work for up to 15 hours every day.

    Its hardly a walk in the park.
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    Mehhhh its only money.


    History jobs aren't even on there!
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Here it is:

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...cle4165690.ece

    Also, thanks for your replies everyone!

    Thanks!
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    The reason why LAW graduates dont show up on the top 15 is because a Law graduate is not a qualified solicitor or barrister. Law grads have to do an additional year to pass the LPC. Therefore they wont start earning a salary untill 2 or 3 years after graduation. Most law firms in the City offer starting salaries ranging between 32k and 100k. The US firms located in London all have starting salaries of over 92k. If you look at the times 100 graduate employers, there are 5 law firms there. Such as Clifford Chance, Eversheds and Simmons and Simmons. A law degree from a good University is one of the most prestigious academic qualifications going.
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    (Original post by RyanT)
    Oh look economics is in the top5.

    Thanks for making my day, that's a good chap.

    P.S. Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate that many skills other then hard work. I wouldn't treat a law graduate as anything special if I was an employer given they haven't proven any numeracy or anything interesting.

    To be fair, you'd think law was better then land&property management though. Lawyers are well paid, but how many law graduates really go into it?
    Law isn't that hard and doesn't demonstrate the many skills other than hard work
    . What an absurd statement - coming from an ABB Lancaster economics student. Law undergraduates have unique and superior problem-solving, research and analytical skills - exceeding most other degrees. They also develop excellent oral communication skills and are also able to pay close attention to detail.
    Not just 'hard work'.

    Do realise that starting salaries are very different to salaries after 5, 10 or 15 years of work. According to the HEFCE Research series, with 2006 values:

    Average annual salary, 11 years after graduation, 2006 values (in pounds)
    Clinical dentistry - 61,718
    Economics - 51,768
    Law - 49,450
    Engineering - 46,992
    Computer science - 45,363
    Mathematics - 45,037
    Accountancy - 44,071
    Business and management - 41,796
    Politics - 37,407
    Languages - 37,393
    History - 36,143
    Geography - 34,668
    Sociology - 31,047
 
 
 
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