Still stalling

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shorttermnomad
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Had 6 two hour lessons and in every lesson I've stalled in every one, although the last two it's not been as bad, maybe a couple of times and I can recover better. Feeling a little more comfortable and confident but still frustrating stalling when moving off.
Instructor teaching me not to use gas to move off but only the clutch which I know is a common method but gas first then bite point seems more natural.
About to do roundabouts. Feel I'm not making enough progress. That said though, my instructor does like a good chat so I think in total I've only had around 4-5 hours of actual driving. P
How did you guys cope with stalling?
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CaptainDuckie
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#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
On my 28th hour and I still stall at least twice every lesson. I make sure to react to it quickly though, at the end of the day, that’s what matters the most. You won’t fail your driving test for stalling once or twice, only if you stall, react really badly and hinder the cars behind you then it could potentially progress into a serious. Just take your time and don’t sweat it.
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Noble.x
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#3
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#3
I was taught both- to press gas first then find the bite point and find the bite point first then press gas. The bite point is usually around midway from fully pressed to fully released (you probably know that). Make sure you slowly raise your foot up until you feel the car moving a little. If the car starts shaking press the clutch to the end so you don’t stall. Another tip is to just give the accelerator a little nudge before finding the bite point so there’s a better chance when you do find it, you won’t stall. Be patient, raise your foot slowly and when the car starts moving slowly start using more gas x
Last edited by Noble.x; 1 month ago
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StriderHort
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#4
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#4
I was taught to 'set' the gas/petrol at about 1100-1200 rpms before bringing up the clutch as standard behaviour. As much as some vehicles like diesels and modern techy petrol ones can move off with just the clutch, I wouldn't say it's normal driving practice, more a decent teaching example of how the clutch works. (if you tried moving off with just the clutch in my 97 petrol car, it would slam to a halt instantly, it's bite point is miniscule)

The RPM dial will often give you a better stall warning before the chugging and jumping, you'll see it start to drop as soon as the clutch starts to bite and can still fine tune it with the gas pedal. When you start seeing it drop past 900, 8, 7... you know a stall is likely coming without corrective action.
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user432
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#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
You can normally feel the car 'judder' a bit before its going to stall. Put the clutch all the way down once you can sense/feel stalling and it makes it practically impossible to stall. Just make sure to cover the brake in case you roll back. You can then use the handbrake and set off again if that helps.
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gtty123
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#6
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#6
Use the gas pedal. Forget what that instructor says. He's only helping you pass the test, after that you're on your own. You might as well learn it the proper way as opposed to being a hazard on the roads trying to figure it out.
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TheMcSame
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#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by shorttermnomad)
Instructor teaching me not to use gas to move off but only the clutch which I know is a common method but gas first then bite point seems more natural.
NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

Your instructor is teaching you how to pass, not how to drive. It isn't a common method used by proper instructors, only the s****y ones.

It's all too familiar story. Lil Timmy learns how to drive in their instructor's diesel, told only to use the clutch when setting off. He passed his test.

Timmy then goes out and buys a poxy little 1L Toyota Aygo and he can't stop stalling it because he's trying to drive it as if it's a diesel. The problem is that the poxy little 1L petrol will have lots of components made of lighter materials, while the diesel will be a bigger capacity thus likely have a longer stroke (diesels tend to have longer strokes anyway because they combust using compression rather than sparks) while also using heavier materials to deal with the additional stresses within a diesel engine, translating to more torque at the low end, including idle.

Diesels also tend to increase fuel to prevent stalling when met with stress. It's similar to an anti-stall system, but instead of bumping the RPMs up like an anti-stall system, it just tries to maintain idle speed. If you try to come to a stop in the wrong gear in a small petrol, it'll stall. Do the same in a diesel and it'll fight the brakes under regular braking.

Those two things are what make diesels more forgiving with poor clutch work

That being said, larger petrol engines can be very diesel-like and may well do the same things. The problem is I'm not sure where that border is. The smallest petrol engine I've seen do it reliably is a 6.2L V8 in a Corvette. I'd imagine you'd get away with it in a 5L Mustang too. But we're talking high-performance engines here that aren't particularly practical for everyday use, especially with the fuel situation atm. Not to mention it's highly unlikely you'd be driving these cars anyway.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 4 weeks ago
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user432
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#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by TheMcSame)
NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

Your instructor is teaching you how to pass, not how to drive. It isn't a common method used by proper instructors, only the s****y ones.

It's all too familiar story. Lil Timmy learns how to drive in their instructor's diesel, told only to use the clutch when setting off. He passed his test.

Timmy then goes out and buys a poxy little 1L Toyota Aygo and he can't stop stalling it because he's trying to drive it as if it's a diesel. The problem is that the poxy little 1L petrol will have lots of components made of lighter materials, while the diesel will be a bigger capacity thus likely have a longer stroke (diesels tend to have longer strokes anyway because they combust using compression rather than sparks) while also using heavier materials to deal with the additional stresses within a diesel engine, translating to more torque at the low end, including idle.

Diesels also tend to increase fuel to prevent stalling when met with stress. It's similar to an anti-stall system, but instead of bumping the RPMs up like an anti-stall system, it just tries to maintain idle speed. If you try to come to a stop in the wrong gear in a small petrol, it'll stall. Do the same in a diesel and it'll fight the brakes under regular braking.

Those two things are what make diesels more forgiving with poor clutch work

That being said, larger petrol engines can be very diesel-like and may well do the same things. The problem is I'm not sure where that border is. The smallest petrol engine I've seen do it reliably is a 6.2L V8 in a Corvette. I'd imagine you'd get away with it in a 5L Mustang too. But we're talking high-performance engines here that aren't particularly practical for everyday use, especially with the fuel situation atm. Not to mention it's highly unlikely you'd be driving these cars anyway.
this, took me like 2 weeks to get used to my 1l petrol lmao
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