how to move off in traffic?

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username5923585
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
hey so i’ve had 7 lessons with my instructor so far.

when waiting in traffic, my instructor has taught me to bring the clutch up to the biting point but leave my foot on the brake and then when the traffic lights change move from the brake to the gas.

i’ve been enjoying this way as i’ve finally started to get the hang of it, but just then i was watching a youtube video and someone commented that you shouldn’t use the brake/clutch method to move off?

so is this the incorrect way of doing it? and how does everyone else do it?
also i’ve not been taught to use the handbrake, only when actually fully stopping the car (like at the end of the lesson or when parking at the side of the road for a while)
Last edited by username5923585; 1 month ago
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Muttly
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#2
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#2
If you are having problems with getting the clutch biting point the instructor may say just use the brake and transfer your brake foot to the gas.

Later you need to have coordination to use the handbrake against the biting point of the clutch in a hill start

Then when you stop for more than a couple of seconds you should use your handbrake instead of your brake. You will need your handbrake on any junctions where there is an incline to avoid rolling back (one of the reasons for a fail in the test)
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username5923585
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#3
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(Original post by Muttly)
If you are having problems with getting the clutch biting point the instructor may say just use the brake and transfer your brake foot to the gas.

Later you need to have coordination to use the handbrake against the biting point of the clutch in a hill start

Then when you stop for more than a couple of seconds you should use your handbrake instead of your brake. You will need your handbrake on any junctions where there is an incline to avoid rolling back (one of the reasons for a fail in the test)
on hills he didn’t make me use the handbrake, just the clutch/brake

but i spoke to my mum about it who’s been driving for years and she said she does the method which i do so i guess i’ll just stick to it for now (:
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TheMcSame
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How you do it is basically meaningless, what matters is that you're in control of the car, that's all that matters from a test perspective.

Best practice is generally considered to be find the bite with the handbrake on, release it, then set off. Why? Well, each foot is only doing one job and your hand is working the brake, so it's probably easier, especially for hill starts. If you roll back you'll catch it quicker with the handbrake rather than having to switch your foot back to the brake pedal, which could be the difference between passing or failing your test.

What do I do? Well, firstly, I think what I, or many people do, is going to be moot. Many of us will have that experience with our car and don't need to find the biting point, we just have it locked in muscle memory and get straight to it, thus what works for us may not work well for a new driver. Particularly, if, like myself, they drive a diesel which generally tends to be much more forgiving when it comes to the clutch, which is why you might see people warn learners about driving instructors who teach you to initially set off using just the clutch. It works in a diesel. In that small poxy 1.0L petrol thing you'll likely get as a first car? It'll be a struggle at best and it'll most likely just throw a fit and stall.

But my method is some variation of coming off the brake while raising the clutch to bite... I think? Idk... I've been driving for almost 7 years now, all 7 years in the same car too. It's not exactly something I put much thought into, it just happens.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 1 month ago
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