The Student Room Group

What's the difference between an NP and an ANP (Nursing)?

Hello! I've been trying to research career paths for myself and I've decided I want to be a nurse. After research, I came across Nurse Practitoners (NP) and Advanced Nurse Practitoners (ANP) but I can't seem to find what the difference between them is!

If anyone can help I'd much appreciate it!
Original post by notbethan
Hello! I've been trying to research career paths for myself and I've decided I want to be a nurse. After research, I came across Nurse Practitoners (NP) and Advanced Nurse Practitoners (ANP) but I can't seem to find what the difference between them is!

If anyone can help I'd much appreciate it!


@Emily_B @moonkatt
Can yous add anything else....

NPs
The Nurse Practitioner is an advanced practice RN (APRN) that has earned a graduate-level nursing degree either a Master of Science degree or a PhD (Doctor of Nursing practice) degree with a focus on Nurse Practitioner. The NP role is a much more specialized role of APRNs. The NP was in the past a master’s level position, but in recent years with advances in scope of practice, the PhD is required. NPs with an MSN have been grandfathered in, but as with all advances in nursing, are encouraged to continue their education to achieve the PhD focus.

Nurse Practitioners can be known by different names in various states. These names include: Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Practitioner Certified, Licensed Nurse Practitioner, or Certified Nurse Practitioner. They all mean the same thing.

APRNs
There are currently four advanced practice nursing specialties. They require either an MSN or a PhD level degree with a focus on one of four categories: Nurse Midwife (CNM), Nurse Practitioner (NP), Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), or Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The C stands for Certified and the R for Registered. Within these categories, each of these providers specialize in specific patient areas such as mental health, pediatrics, gerontology, nephrology, women’s health, neonatology, oncology, emergency medicine, or family medicine





A registered midwife.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Tracey_W
@Emily_B @moonkatt
Can yous add anything else....

NPs
The Nurse Practitioner is an advanced practice RN (APRN) that has earned a graduate-level nursing degree either a Master of Science degree or a PhD (Doctor of Nursing practice) degree with a focus on Nurse Practitioner. The NP role is a much more specialized role of APRNs. The NP was in the past a master’s level position, but in recent years with advances in scope of practice, the PhD is required. NPs with an MSN have been grandfathered in, but as with all advances in nursing, are encouraged to continue their education to achieve the PhD focus.

Nurse Practitioners can be known by different names in various states. These names include: Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Practitioner Certified, Licensed Nurse Practitioner, or Certified Nurse Practitioner. They all mean the same thing.

APRNs
There are currently four advanced practice nursing specialties. They require either an MSN or a PhD level degree with a focus on one of four categories: Nurse Midwife (CNM), Nurse Practitioner (NP), Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), or Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The C stands for Certified and the R for Registered. Within these categories, each of these providers specialize in specific patient areas such as mental health, pediatrics, gerontology, nephrology, women’s health, neonatology, oncology, emergency medicine, or family medicine





A registered midwife.




Thanks for the tag. The stuff you've posted here is for US nurses where the structure and way they work is a little different to the UK where enhanced/advanced practice roles are less regulated at the moment.

There are a whole host of different job titles for nurses working in practitioner type roles, clinical nurse specialist (CNS), advanced nurse practitioner (ANP), advanced clinical practitioner (ACP), advanced critical care practitioner (ACCP), emergency nurse practitioner (ENP), the list goes on and on and on. I follow a professor on twitter who specialises workforce and she has a list of thousands of titles like these, some for registered roles some for non-registered roles. So it's quite confusing.

However, with credentialing for advanced practice roles, some are trying to make things a little clearer. The general expectation for an ANP/ACP is that they are a registered nurse (or AHP in the case of ACP) and have completed a programme of study at level 7 (masters) in advanced clinical practice and hold a prescribing qualification. This is not mandated though and is only voluntary, though many employers these days are asking for evidence of advanced practice credentialing for those applying for these roles.

The title nurse practitioner, is a bit more vague and is one that some people are trying to phase out, as there is no set definition and the skill set of individuals working in these roles can vary hugely. My current clinical role sits within this no mans land of practice. There's been a lot of work done on defining what enhanced practice is and I imagine we will see this used a lot more commonly as a title and terminology for roles between staff nurse type roles and advanced practice roles. You'll find sometimes people in trainee ANP posts will describe themselves as NPs.

You'll find a load more information about this sort of stuff on the HEE advancing practice site: https://advanced-practice.hee.nhs.uk/

Original post by notbethan
Hello! I've been trying to research career paths for myself and I've decided I want to be a nurse. After research, I came across Nurse Practitoners (NP) and Advanced Nurse Practitoners (ANP) but I can't seem to find what the difference between them is!

If anyone can help I'd much appreciate it!

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending