Particles q help plssss

Watch this thread
Htx_x346
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Why is the mass not required? Ke=0.5 mv^2= hc/lamda?Name:  6C00065B-ADD5-4931-AF83-421C6283C734.jpeg
Views: 13
Size:  45.7 KB
And why is answer d wrong?Name:  18978724-676E-45C5-A04F-ABEA5BD67592.jpeg
Views: 12
Size:  52.0 KB I did -21.8+5.4
Last edited by Htx_x346; 1 month ago
0
reply
Skiwi
Badges: 13
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Htx_x346)
Why is the mass not required? Ke=0.5 mv^2= hc/lamda?Name:  6C00065B-ADD5-4931-AF83-421C6283C734.jpeg
Views: 13
Size:  45.7 KB
And why is answer d wrong?Name:  18978724-676E-45C5-A04F-ABEA5BD67592.jpeg
Views: 12
Size:  52.0 KB I did -21.8+5.4
For the second question, you've worked out the amount of energy required for the energy level jump. The question asks for the energy of the free electron after the collision.

The first question I'm not entirely sure, I think it's because the energy of the accelerated electron can be given as eV( where is e is the charge of an electron and V is the potential difference). So eV=hc/lamda and from here the only variable missing is mass. Someone correct me if my answer to part 1 is wrong, as I said I'm not sure.
Last edited by Skiwi; 1 month ago
0
reply
Htx_x346
Badges: 16
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Skiwi)
For the second question, you've worked out the amount of energy required for the energy level jump. The question asks for the energy of the free electron after the collision.

The first question I'm not entirely sure, I think it's because the energy of the accelerated electron can be given as eV( where is e is the charge of an electron and V is the potential difference). So eV=hc/lamda and from here the only variable missing is mass. Someone correct me if my answer to part 1 is wrong, as I said I'm not sure.
Thank you x
0
reply
tarmac-the-cat
Badges: 1
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
That is correct.eV = hc / lambda
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest

Were exams easier or harder than you expected?

Easier (41)
25.95%
As I expected (52)
32.91%
Harder (58)
36.71%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (7)
4.43%

Watched Threads

View All