Advice for studying mathematics

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Anonymous #1
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Hi, I am an offer holder for mathematics and stats. In high school, I study IB diploma. The courses I got taken are math AA, Econ & Phy (High level) and LL, Eb & Chem (Standard Level). I know in this university every exam is important, so I am wondering is there any advice you can give, for instance is it necessary to study before the university? How to prepare? Any good sources? I'd really appreciate if you can help.
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superharrydude09
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It’s always good to get some pre-reading done. You could always look at maths modules that you haven’t taken, I’m not too sure how IB maths course works, but from a glance there are optional modules, so it might be worth looking at ones you haven’t done. Also, Cambridge step papers might be a good way to prepare for the type of questions faced at university, although some papers require full further maths a level content, so again, I don’t know how much IB maths course covers. You might also like to consider some sort of intro to proofs course, since maths at university is much more proof-heavy.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by superharrydude09)
It’s always good to get some pre-reading done. You could always look at maths modules that you haven’t taken, I’m not too sure how IB maths course works, but from a glance there are optional modules, so it might be worth looking at ones you haven’t done. Also, Cambridge step papers might be a good way to prepare for the type of questions faced at university, although some papers require full further maths a level content, so again, I don’t know how much IB maths course covers. You might also like to consider some sort of intro to proofs course, since maths at university is much more proof-heavy.
Hey, thanks for your help! That's very helpful! I am actually reading books from college recommended list. I have just finished linear algebra by Allenby, and I am currently working on group theory! I could feel from these books that college math has lots of proving. In reading group theory, I am overwhelmed by them actually. Some theorems look intuitively correct, but proving them is another story for me. To be honest, I haven't received such training before, so survival in college might be a problem for me. I am wondering if every math test is also crowded with proving. (is it hard or not?) How to be good in math department?
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Shawn2006
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(Original post by superharrydude09)
It’s always good to get some pre-reading done. You could always look at maths modules that you haven’t taken, I’m not too sure how IB maths course works, but from a glance there are optional modules, so it might be worth looking at ones you haven’t done. Also, Cambridge step papers might be a good way to prepare for the type of questions faced at university, although some papers require full further maths a level content, so again, I don’t know how much IB maths course covers. You might also like to consider some sort of intro to proofs course, since maths at university is much more proof-heavy.
hey question.. ik this has nothing to do with the question but.. i live in America and we just call it "math" but do the British call it "maths" or is that just like typing slang?
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Interea
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(Original post by Shawn2006)
hey question.. ik this has nothing to do with the question but.. i live in America and we just call it "math" but do the British call it "maths" or is that just like typing slang?
Yes we call it maths all the time

(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey, thanks for your help! That's very helpful! I am actually reading books from college recommended list. I have just finished linear algebra by Allenby, and I am currently working on group theory! I could feel from these books that college math has lots of proving. In reading group theory, I am overwhelmed by them actually. Some theorems look intuitively correct, but proving them is another story for me. To be honest, I haven't received such training before, so survival in college might be a problem for me. I am wondering if every math test is also crowded with proving. (is it hard or not?) How to be good in math department?
There is a lot of proof, but you get used to it with practice, and any good maths degree should help you through that transition (although I can't speak for Imperial specifically). It becomes quite fun and satisfying once you get the hang of it! You're not expected to start university already knowing everything; you're there to learn, so just getting a taste of what you might see through books (as you are currently doing) seems like a good start.
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mqb2766
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hey, thanks for your help! That's very helpful! I am actually reading books from college recommended list. I have just finished linear algebra by Allenby, and I am currently working on group theory! I could feel from these books that college math has lots of proving. In reading group theory, I am overwhelmed by them actually. Some theorems look intuitively correct, but proving them is another story for me. To be honest, I haven't received such training before, so survival in college might be a problem for me. I am wondering if every math test is also crowded with proving. (is it hard or not?) How to be good in math department?
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Towards-Hig.../dp/1316614832
was aimed at this type of scenario. More about consolidating your knowledge rather than learning new stuff. An earlier "version" is at
https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/system/fi...ents/notes.pdf

Must admit, Id be "anonymous" if I was going to learn maths. However, its probably worth noting that its not necessary to study over the summer.
Last edited by mqb2766; 4 weeks ago
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Tonnnyett
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(Original post by mqb2766)
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Towards-Hig.../dp/1316614832
was aimed at this type of scenario. More about consolidating your knowledge rather than learning new stuff. An earlier "version" is at
https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/system/fi...ents/notes.pdf

Must admit, Id be "anonymous" if I was going to learn maths
Hahaha! That's really helpful! (You must come from Britain )
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