Ionisation energy help plss

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Htx_x346
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#1
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#1
In chem i was taught ionisation is the minimum amount of energy to remove an electron. I came across a question where the mark scheme suggests that the ionisation energy is a definite amount of energy equals to the difference in energy levels.
Im confused because I thought the colliding electron does not need to have a specific amount of energy for ionisation so long as it it is bugger than the difference in energy levels.
Hope that made sense?
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Arkcano
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#2
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(Original post by Htx_x346)
In chem i was taught ionisation is the minimum amount of energy to remove an electron. I came across a question where the mark scheme suggests that the ionisation energy is a definite amount of energy equals to the difference in energy levels.
Im confused because I thought the colliding electron does not need to have a specific amount of energy for ionisation so long as it it is bugger than the difference in energy levels.
Hope that made sense?
Firstly understand this. Every element has different energy levels. So an electron in eg copper may need 2 Joules of energy to get removed but that doesnt mean that if i gave a a zinc electron 2 joules it would also get removed. It may require more energy as the 3d orbital is fully filled in zinc therefore its more stable and requires more energy.
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Htx_x346
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#3
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(Original post by Arkcano)
Firstly understand this. Every element has different energy levels. So an electron in eg copper may need 2 Joules of energy to get removed but that doesnt mean that if i gave a a zinc electron 2 joules it would also get removed. It may require more energy as the 3d orbital is fully filled in zinc therefore its more stable and requires more energy.
Yh makes sense
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Arkcano
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The most appropriate definition for ionisation would be the amount of energy required to remove 1 mol of electrons from 1 mol of gaseous metal atoms. This is only for first ionisation energy.
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Arkcano
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#5
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So remember the energy levels are fixed values for each atom.
Go on google and take a look at how energy levels are represented. When i had sat my as levels they made us calculate. The excitation energy and to which energy level would the electron jump to.
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Htx_x346
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(Original post by Arkcano)
The most appropriate definition for ionisation would be the amount of energy required to remove 1 mol of electrons from 1 mol of gaseous metal atoms. This is only for first ionisation energy.
Yeah thats why im confused? The mark scheme says the ionisation energy is always a definite amount of energy but like you said its the minimum amount of energy to remove the electron, so its not really definite?
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Arkcano
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(Original post by Htx_x346)
Yeah thats why im confused? The mark scheme says the ionisation energy is always a definite amount of energy but like you said its the minimum amount of energy to remove the electron, so its not really definite?
I think you misread my comment. I didn't say minimum. The best answer is ionisation energy is the amount of energy required to remove 1 mol of electrons from 1 mol of gaseous atoms. You shouldn't write minimum.
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Htx_x346
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#8
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(Original post by Arkcano)
I think you misread my comment. I didn't say minimum. The best answer is ionisation energy is the amount of energy required to remove 1 mol of electrons from 1 mol of gaseous atoms. You shouldn't write minimum.
Ok thanks
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