Will I be overworking myself (working and studying at the same time)?

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Anonymous #1
#1
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Hi guys, I am slightly older than most students (early twenties) so I currently have a full time job, as well as my university offer. This also means that I have a pretty clear idea of how much money I need to live and to live securely.

In my current job, I got offered a promotion (assistant to GM in a restaurant) that would give me more flexibility, higher pay and more opportunities to acquire bonus pay but I am also a little worried of spreading myself too thin. I also just know that my maintenance loan is really low, compared to cost of living, so I would have to work way too much at a minimum wage job anyways if I quit.

If I accept the promotion, I will probably work 80 hours most weeks, with 40 of this being studying, 30 being my job and then using the final 10 hours wherever they are needed most.

I don't usually work more than 60 hours, 5 or 6 days a week, so I am wondering how much work other people tend to put into their university jobs and their studies, or whether they have ever tried to do too much and burnt themselves out?
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De Montfort University
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi guys, I am slightly older than most students (early twenties) so I currently have a full time job, as well as my university offer. This also means that I have a pretty clear idea of how much money I need to live and to live securely.

In my current job, I got offered a promotion (assistant to GM in a restaurant) that would give me more flexibility, higher pay and more opportunities to acquire bonus pay but I am also a little worried of spreading myself too thin. I also just know that my maintenance loan is really low, compared to cost of living, so I would have to work way too much at a minimum wage job anyways if I quit.

If I accept the promotion, I will probably work 80 hours most weeks, with 40 of this being studying, 30 being my job and then using the final 10 hours wherever they are needed most.

I don't usually work more than 60 hours, 5 or 6 days a week, so I am wondering how much work other people tend to put into their university jobs and their studies, or whether they have ever tried to do too much and burnt themselves out?
Hi,

Just to offer my own experience on the matter. I found the transition to university life quite difficult at first. Before going to university I worked part-time in retail. They offered me the opportunity for a transfer. However, I declined the offer as I wanted to focus on my course - BA Animation. Though it varies from course to course, I was pretty bombarded with assignments week in and out. I found myself burnt around Christmas time. Bouncing back took a bit, but I pulled through at the end of it. It helped that I didn't have other responsibilities to think about.

It took a little bit of time to adjust, but fast forward to the present day, I find myself being able to balance out studies, work, leisure, etc a lot better. 1st Year taught me a lot about how to balance my time - I found out what was doable and what wasn't. I got myself a part-time job with the university during my 2nd year (currently still working with them) picking up shifts here and there.

I hope this helps,
Jesse, 3rd Year Student Ambassador
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Submarine94
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#3
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I personally wouldn't advise having a full time job with such high responsibilities while also studying in university full time too. I think it will be very difficult, stressful, and can possibly take a toll on your mental health because you will be overwhelmed and bombarded with too many responsibilities and expectations at the same time. You can end up becoming very tired and potentially won't give your all to either your job or your studies as a result. If you really want to go for the job, then personally I would change to either part-time studying, distance learning, or an online university, such as The Open University, for example. If you choose to stick to full time studying, then I would suggest working part time but maybe in a different job which would pay much better than your current job/salary. This is just my opinion though, I wish you the best of luck in whatever you choose and decide to do 😊
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jiajane
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I do think it depends on how rigorous the course is and whether you can effectively time manage. I didn’t work in my first year but the amount of assignments and readings I got given made me glad I didn’t have a job. Also the fact I was horrible at planning & time management. In 2nd year I somewhat got the hang of it and was able to handle both my studies and a part time job (16 hrs on weekends) with no severe burnouts. Though I did see a slight drop in my final grades due to having less opportunities/ free time to extra self study or prepare for an exam. Hope this helps!
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Flum98
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Depends on the course. You could try it to begin with. Not many first year university students spending 40 hours studying.... I did Business and had 8 hours a week lectures (optional), 4 hours a week seminars (recommended) 4 hours a week tutorials (mandatory) and then actual essays etc probably 10 hours a week. So no where near 40. If your course is high contact though.... I worked part time first and second year, then full time in final year... although had a bit of a breakdown before finals!
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Ghostlady
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#6
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80 hours a week is a lot with full time work and uni combined. Might be ok for first term, but you will soon burnout. 20 hours a week with job at a push. Thing is you have to weigh up whats important because it sounds like you want both uni and keep the career as GM, but thats going to be super hard to keep up.
Would it be easier to be GM and then apply at uni once you saved some money and applied a year or two down the line? Then you have money to back you up in savings, and gives you time to find a little part time job when you do study if its needed.
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Uni of Southampton Students
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#7
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi guys, I am slightly older than most students (early twenties) so I currently have a full time job, as well as my university offer. This also means that I have a pretty clear idea of how much money I need to live and to live securely.

In my current job, I got offered a promotion (assistant to GM in a restaurant) that would give me more flexibility, higher pay and more opportunities to acquire bonus pay but I am also a little worried of spreading myself too thin. I also just know that my maintenance loan is really low, compared to cost of living, so I would have to work way too much at a minimum wage job anyways if I quit.

If I accept the promotion, I will probably work 80 hours most weeks, with 40 of this being studying, 30 being my job and then using the final 10 hours wherever they are needed most.

I don't usually work more than 60 hours, 5 or 6 days a week, so I am wondering how much work other people tend to put into their university jobs and their studies, or whether they have ever tried to do too much and burnt themselves out?
Hello,

I am a third-year law student at the University of Southampton. I think it is definitely manageable to have a job and go to university. I know plenty of people who have worked alongside their degrees and have been able to do both. However, depending on how many contact hours you have and your course, working a job alongside your degree will be easier or harder. For example, I know STEM subjects tend to have a lot more contact hours than humanities subjects, which can make working a job alongside university a lot more difficult as you have less flexibility timetabling wise.

I would recommend letting your work know of your timetable as soon as you can to see how flexible they can be. I also think it can be useful to give yourself an adjustment period to see how much of your time your course demands of you/how much time you will have to spend studying depending on how difficult you find your course. Then based on this, you can decide how much time you can afford to spend working and studying. University and Student Union jobs can be a good option for working around your studies as these jobs factor in the fact that you have classes to attend and work around your timetable. There are usually a range of jobs you can do - some which will require more commitment and others more casual jobs so I would recommend checking these out at your university if you find your current job does not offer as much flexibility!

All the best,

Teresa (University of Southampton Ambassador)
https://www.southampton.ac.uk/
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The University of Law Students
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#8
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hi guys, I am slightly older than most students (early twenties) so I currently have a full time job, as well as my university offer. This also means that I have a pretty clear idea of how much money I need to live and to live securely.

In my current job, I got offered a promotion (assistant to GM in a restaurant) that would give me more flexibility, higher pay and more opportunities to acquire bonus pay but I am also a little worried of spreading myself too thin. I also just know that my maintenance loan is really low, compared to cost of living, so I would have to work way too much at a minimum wage job anyways if I quit.

If I accept the promotion, I will probably work 80 hours most weeks, with 40 of this being studying, 30 being my job and then using the final 10 hours wherever they are needed most.

I don't usually work more than 60 hours, 5 or 6 days a week, so I am wondering how much work other people tend to put into their university jobs and their studies, or whether they have ever tried to do too much and burnt themselves out?
Hi,

Time management is definitely a very important skill for working and being at university. I myself work a zero hour contract job while being at university and most weeks working around 25 hours. I then have timetabled classes for 12 hours a week then I spend most of my time doing independent study. It is definitely possible to work a job and be at university. However, it may be best to let your job know about your place at university so they are aware and possibly open to being more flexible and understanding with your work.

All the best
Kasey - ULaw Student Ambassador
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