Fear of spontaneous human combustion

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Oliviaz77
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#1
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#1
For the last few months I've had this fear of spontaneous human combustion that has come out of nowhere and it affects my daily functioning. I can't help but think about it most days and because of it I always feel anxious and it's non stop everyday, even when I feel calm in the back of my mind I'm like "what if it happens when I'm relaxing" it makes me feel short of breath and I always feel like it's going to happen to me. When I try and distract myself the thoughts are still there I can't get rid of them. Is this anxiety/mental illness?
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Muttly
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#2
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#2
Have you watched recently on TV or video about unexplained phenomena or human spontaneous combustion as a concept? When you first see a documentary about it, it is quite a shocking thing to believe, and little wonder your head has a hard time getting around it all and grasping the process?

Recorded examples where human spontaneous combustion have been considered as an occurrence are extremely rare and are usually are cited because no one can think of anything else as a cause. Possibly one or two people in the world population every thousands of years. Work out the ordinary death rate per world billions? Better chance of winning the lottery twice? So it is a theory rather than an accepted known cause and even then researchers think such links as alcoholism, or certain diabetic conditions creating excess acetone. If you are fit and well you just don't even fit into the potential category. So now look at why this might be such an issue for you?

The fear of dying can overwhelm you if you let it but it is a most natural aspect of life. In the Western World we are not comfortable with talking about death. Sometimes it is the pain or the unknown that people are most afraid of. When you research and ask people who witness many many people who have died from sudden trauma, it is often the case that near the point of death people are very peaceful and the whole body systems have shut down. You have nothing to fear from death and you won't die until you reach your own unique sell by date. No one knows what date that is, including me or you. So in the meantime just keep going.

What you describe is more a kind of an anxiety style panic attack. Carefully rewind the 'tape' in your head when you start such an episode. Look at the start of the cyclical physiological pattern. It is usually the same every time. Which comes first, the breathing going off, the tingling, the head rush? Recognise it as soon as it starts and stop the rot. Assuming you have no underlying physical health problems (& if you do take medical advice first) Work out what is the first stage in this and stop it in its tracks. Have a mantra word for you feeling safe & OK (keep thinking it) and then breath deeply and breathe again deeply. Hold your breath for about 15 seconds and then breathe out again slowly and deeply. Push away all thoughts of panic and replace them with positive images and actions. Find something physical to do, talk to someone or do something away from solitary empty thoughts.

It is always worth going to take professional medical advice where something intrusive is bothering you particularly if you feel it is interfering with your everyday life. Unfortunately talking therapies (which are mainly common sense based) face a waiting list of months to access. Try some of the 'self help' pages on mind.org looking at anxiety or panic attacks. Do what you can to calm your mind. If there are practical things you can do to alleviate a worry then do it. For worries outside of your control - let them go, either they are not yours to worry about or they are completely out of your hands (you can't do anything) Either way find someone somewhere to watch a funny film or get to share some bad jokes. Find the laughter zone as this is the best antidote of all.
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Guru Jason
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#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
Lmao, we all get these thoughts. It's called an existential crisis. I'm 32 and it's normally what you feel that kick-start a mid life crisis. I get existential thoughts all the time.
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