Turn on thread page Beta

Is this a good enough AS-level Revision Timetable? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys,

    Im just wondering if this is a good enough revision timetable or not for my AS-levels? Each slot is 1hour and then I have a 30min break and then another hour on a different subject starts etc...

    Should I make revision per subject 2hours or keep it at 1hour? If I do 2hours per subject then it would be 2subjects a day which last for 2hours each.

    Please feel free to post relevant comments/adivce below !

    Timetable -

    Thanks

    Amit
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    fine in theory.
    depends how much you actually get done though
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Haha, I made one of those.

    It's in the bin.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Annaconda)
    fine in theory.
    depends how much you actually get done though
    Hopefully just read my notes and remember what I can,then make short bullet pointed notes and try to memorise them, practise a few exam questions and then nearer to the exams practise past papers !
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Amit92)
    Hey guys,

    Im just wondering if this is a good enough revision timetable or not for my AS-levels? Each slot is 1hour and then I have a 30min break and then another hour on a different subject starts etc...

    Should I make revision per subject 2hours or keep it at 1hour? If I do 2hours per subject then it would be 2subjects a day which last for 2hours each.

    Please feel free to post relevant comments/adivce below !

    Timetable -

    Thanks

    Amit
    You know what I never revised for my as-levels or a-levels until about 3 days before the exam?

    Do you know why this is? Becuause I learnt what i was meant to learn there and then..honestly, it helped so much, meant i didn't have to re-learn or go over things i hadn't paid attention too nearer the exams, and my revision simply consisted of praticen papers as I knew what i was meant too know before then...

    honestly, it works for some people, not others though...but i ended up with aab
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anna_spanner89)
    You know what I never revised for my as-levels or a-levels until about 3 days before the exam?

    Do you know why this is? Becuause I learnt what i was meant to learn there and then..honestly, it helped so much, meant i didn't have to re-learn or go over things i hadn't paid attention too nearer the exams, and my revision simply consisted of praticen papers as I knew what i was meant too know before then...

    honestly, it works for some people, not others though...but i ended up with aab
    Wow, Yeh I get what you mean, but isn't it better to start a few weeks early just so you have that gurantee of remembering information more easily than it being all crammed in to your mind at the last minute?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Amit92)
    Wow, Yeh I get what you mean, but isn't it better to start a few weeks early just so you have that gurantee of remembering information more easily than it being all crammed in to your mind at the last minute?

    well if you start when you learn it when it's fresher, and then obviously revist it when it links into another area of your course.

    For example when doing biology, i learnt about fats and lipids in one module..then another about lipids in the cell, and revisited my notes and learning on lipids to draw a link.

    To be frank, if you know and have learned and praticed something well enough revision should simply be a test of your recall, not re-learning and trying to remember
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anna_spanner89)
    well if you start when you learn it when it's fresher, and then obviously revist it when it links into another area of your course.

    For example when doing biology, i learnt about fats and lipids in one module..then another about lipids in the cell, and revisited my notes and learning on lipids to draw a link.

    To be frank, if you know and have learned and praticed something well enough revision should simply be a test of your recall, not re-learning and trying to remember
    Yehhh I got alot to cover and refresh my mind with because ive been falling back thats why the timetable is extreme lol!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    When are you revising for?! Please tell me it's not June.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I never revised for any of my exams. Haven't even revised for University exams thus far. Strikes me as a pointless exercise that just makes you worried and stressed. I tend to find that you either know what you are talking about or you don't.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Amit92)
    Hey guys,

    Im just wondering if this is a good enough revision timetable or not for my AS-levels? Each slot is 1hour and then I have a 30min break and then another hour on a different subject starts etc...

    Should I make revision per subject 2hours or keep it at 1hour? If I do 2hours per subject then it would be 2subjects a day which last for 2hours each.
    I don't mean to be a downer but you won't stick to it.

    I got 5 A*'s at GCSE, so this seems to be a good method that I was taught!

    Basically make a timetable that has all of your free time marked on it. Do this on a wipeboard timetable, they sell them at staples. They also sell a post-it one which I loved.

    In this free time, add certain topics that you have no clue about so you can truly focus on what you need to know to pass the exam.

    xxx
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Don't know about you, but closing to the exams I was cramming about 6-7 hours a day doing revision/practice papers etc etc.

    If you are on study leave, don't you reckon 3-4 hour a day on four topics is a bit light? Considering you spent 10 hours sleeping, 1 hour eating - you have 9-10 extra hours...

    If that's during school days, then that's pretty good
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was told to make one, so I didn't

    Will my devience ever end?

    My revision starts a few days before exams just to freshen up on niggly smaller parts, I usually remember most of what I'm taught.

    I'm also VERY lazy
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    It looks like a good timetable to me, if you can stick to it. Personally, I would have my days more like the Saturday and Sunday ones - where you focus on only two subjects per day. Still keep to the hour work, half hour break though. But that's just me - you may find it easier to concentrate if you have variety, but I like to focus in on one or two things at a time.

    When are you thinking of starting this? And how do you revise? Make sure you allow, say, one session per subject a week to do a past paper as these are really helpful to get to know what the examiner wants out of a question. Also, questions tend to be recycled so you eventually recognise a specific style and know what to do straight away because you've seen similar things before, and you know what that mark scheme was asking from you
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    (Original post by Jon7)
    DIf you are on study leave, don't you reckon 3-4 hour a day on four topics is a bit light? Considering you spent 10 hours sleeping, 1 hour eating - you have 9-10 extra hours...
    3 - 4 a day on 4 four topics is fine IMO. I wouldn't consider doing more than a an hour a day on one topic. If you mean a whole subject then yeah, I'd probably put more into it. Nobody should be forced to do more than they need to do... But it depends on the person; some people need to revise more than others.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by inksplodge)
    3 - 4 a day on 4 four topics is fine IMO. I wouldn't consider doing more than a an hour a day on one topic. If you mean a whole subject then yeah, I'd probably put more into it. Nobody should be forced to do more than they need to do... But it depends on the person; some people need to revise more than others.
    Fair advice. I'm the type who normally leaves everything to study leave, that's why I have to spend a lot of time cramming
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I've never made a revision timetable per se, I just start to really hit the books about a month (maybe two) before my first exam and then study what I need to.

    Spose everyone has their own little ways of doing stuff.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    This is what I did:

    I split my week up into 6 sessions a day, two before lunch, two after lunch, and two after dinner

    My revision sessions for each subject are 1 hour 30 mins, and conveniently - depends when you regularly have lunch and dinner - two revision sessions fit into the two blocks (before lunch, after lunch, and before dinner) if that makes sense.

    I time slotted in when I did regular activities, meaning I couldn't revise in these times, and so far it's working well

    Good look

    If you want me to explain any more then i will
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    (Original post by Jon7)
    Fair advice. I'm the type who normally leaves everything to study leave, that's why I have to spend a lot of time cramming
    We didn't get study leave at AS so it's better to make a habit out of revising rather than leaving it to the last minute
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    I found it wasn't about the time, but how intensely you work within that. I mean, if you work for 8 hours but are not concentrated for 7 of them, then your time has been wasted. Try to mix up the styles of revision. Also, how many weeks will you be keeping that up? I suggest add a couple hours to it as you get closer to exam dates.
 
 
 

University open days

  • University of Exeter
    Undergraduate Open Days - Exeter Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • University of Bradford
    Faculty of Health Studies Postgraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
  • Northumbria University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 24 Oct '18
Poll
Do protests make a difference in political decisions?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.