bowlingforsoph
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#1
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#1
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Last edited by bowlingforsoph ; 4 weeks ago
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strawberrygemini
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#2
Report 4 weeks ago
#2
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
There are quite a few small unis (by size of students) within quite big cities- like St Marys in London. but some small unis in small areas which I can think of are the university of St Andrews (which is minimum ABB for English), Bath Spa University (BCC). Here's a list I found that ranks the unis by size: Vhttps://en-academic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/1320350
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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#3
Report 4 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hi!

When looking round universities I found Chichester and Winchester to be small but friendly universities, but for me they were too small for what I wanted out of universities. However, I would definitely check those two out.
I chose Portsmouth, however, because I found it to be a better atmosphere for me and when I use to suffer from anxiety. The wellbeing staff were really supportive and the residential team too. You can also choose accommodation that suits your needs, ie. a quieter area or catered. The union also has lots going on to support students and there's plenty of friendly societies and sports to choose from.

I hope this helps!
Best wishes
Chloe - Official Student Rep
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Feastful
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#4
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#4
Smaller uni's don't necessarily equate to smaller crowds. I would strongly recommend going to open days to check uni's out in person. Some of the larger uni's might have a lot of students but their campus's are so large, you don't feel a sense of being crowded and there are plenty of spaces to go take time out if you need it.

Edit: I would also like to add, that you should consider your universities ranking as well; not only will it reflect the quality of education that you'll likely recieve, but it will MASSIVELY effect how valuable your grade actually ends up being in a CV.
Last edited by Feastful; 4 weeks ago
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EvaB23
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#5
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#5
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
I've applied and hope to go to Bangor University in North Wales. It's not too tiny but it is certainly not as big and hectic as other unis and it's in such a nice and relatively peaceful place by the sea and mountains. I've heard the atmosphere there is also super friendly
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Muttley79
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#6
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#6
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
I'd look at Exeter - lovely green campus and a well-being centre.
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University of Suffolk student
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#7
Report 3 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hi bowlingforsoph - I completely understand! I visited lots of different universities on Open Days - some large unis, some small, some rural and some urban so I'd definitely recommend attending a few yourself as it'll help you get a feel for the uni, the surrounding area and the course! It's definitely worth looking into commuting as well even if you were planning to live on campus as you might want to go home every few weeks or months (so to look into journey times, ticket prices etc.)

I immediately fell in love with Suffolk when I visited it on the Open Day as I've grown up in a more rural area and the university has the beautiful waterfront and open green spaces and parks nearby so I could go on walks and relax, as well as offering a great mix of shops and the town nearby too (so I could go out with friends to the cinema, go bowling, shopping for any food & uni bits).

If you have any questions about the course at a university such as class sizes, contact hours, opportunities etc., then their course homepage should have contact details for the module leaders and lecturers. I've attached ours here if you want to check it out as we offer BA (Hons) English!

Let me know if you have any other questions and good luck! Choosing a university is always difficult decision!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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vicvic38
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#8
Report 3 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by University of Suffolk student)
Hi bowlingforsoph - I completely understand! I visited lots of different universities on Open Days - some large unis, some small, some rural and some urban so I'd definitely recommend attending a few yourself as it'll help you get a feel for the uni, the surrounding area and the course! It's definitely worth looking into commuting as well even if you were planning to live on campus as you might want to go home every few weeks or months (so to look into journey times, ticket prices etc.)

I immediately fell in love with Suffolk when I visited it on the Open Day as I've grown up in a more rural area and the university has the beautiful waterfront and open green spaces and parks nearby so I could go on walks and relax, as well as offering a great mix of shops and the town nearby too (so I could go out with friends to the cinema, go bowling, shopping for any food & uni bits).

If you have any questions about the course at a university such as class sizes, contact hours, opportunities etc., then their course homepage should have contact details for the module leaders and lecturers. I've attached ours here if you want to check it out as we offer BA (Hons) English!

Let me know if you have any other questions and good luck! Choosing a university is always difficult decision!

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
It's quite rare to hear someone talk about Ipswich like that :eek::rofl3:

Might I recommend, if you've not done so already, taking the train from the Derby Road stop (closer to the uni than the actual Ipswich stop) down to Felixstowe for the beach? It's only 25 mins, and a few quid. Good fish and chips (Fish Dish is good, as is the place actually attached to the pier) plenty of ice cream (Little Ice Cream Co. is my foremost recommendation.) Perfect day out for someone in Ipswich.

This does highlight that you can't really rely on what other people think of the place, you really have to get a vibe for yourself. I couldn't imagine studying or living in Ipswich as a young person (might move there later in life,) but others might really like it.
Last edited by vicvic38; 3 weeks ago
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ChichesterStuRep
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#9
Report 3 weeks ago
#9
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hiya!

I am a third-year student at the University of Chichester. Much like you, I wanted to go to a small community-based university as I knew this would help my anxiety. Initially, I went to a bigger Russell group university and found it wasn't for me quite quickly! Coming to Chichester was so refreshing as the well-being team did everything they could to minimise my anxiety around studies and student life.

I would suggest attending as many open days as you can (Chicester has one on July 2nd) to get a feel for campuses and student life. Chichester hasn't got the most buzzing nightlife however, we have a very busy SU and a fair few options in town, and a nightclub near our sister campus in Bognor Regis.

And... if it matters to you... we are 13th in the UK for our English and creative writing courses (As rated by the guardian), as well as having a PGCE for Secondary English ( https://www.chi.ac.uk/teaching/cours...ndary-english/ ).

Good luck with your studies!

Rylee - Student Ambassador
3rd Year Advanced Applied Psychology
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Bangor Uni
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#10
Report 3 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hi there,

It sounds like Bangor University would be a good fit for you! Bangor is a small city in north Wales and we have around 10,000 students at the University. Many students choose to come to Bangor because it's such a friendly place, it's also in a beautiful location. You can find out more about the University itself here: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/student-life

As for our courses, we have a long list of English related courses, and we also offer PGCE courses. You can find more information here: https://www.bangor.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/english
https://www.bangor.ac.uk/courses/pos...sh-medium-pgce

Please let me know if I can answer any questions for you, I would be happy to help
Anna
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nerdsciencefreak
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#11
Report 3 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by University of Portsmouth Student Rep)
Hi!

When looking round universities I found Chichester and Winchester to be small but friendly universities, but for me they were too small for what I wanted out of universities. However, I would definitely check those two out.
I chose Portsmouth, however, because I found it to be a better atmosphere for me and when I use to suffer from anxiety. The wellbeing staff were really supportive and the residential team too. You can also choose accommodation that suits your needs, ie. a quieter area or catered. The union also has lots going on to support students and there's plenty of friendly societies and sports to choose from.

I hope this helps!
Best wishes
Chloe - Official Student Rep
what was the interview process at portsmouth?
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University of Suffolk student
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#12
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#12
(Original post by vicvic38)
It's quite rare to hear someone talk about Ipswich like that :eek::rofl3:

Might I recommend, if you've not done so already, taking the train from the Derby Road stop (closer to the uni than the actual Ipswich stop) down to Felixstowe for the beach? It's only 25 mins, and a few quid. Good fish and chips (Fish Dish is good, as is the place actually attached to the pier) plenty of ice cream (Little Ice Cream Co. is my foremost recommendation.) Perfect day out for someone in Ipswich.

This does highlight that you can't really rely on what other people think of the place, you really have to get a vibe for yourself. I couldn't imagine studying or living in Ipswich as a young person (might move there later in life,) but others might really like it.
Hi vicvic38 - you're completely right! it's definitely up to the individual person and what feels right for them Also I agree that Felixstowe is lovely, especially when the weather is nice. Thanks for the tips!! :flower2:

Emma
3rd year diagnostic radiography student
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Uni of Southampton Students
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#13
Report 3 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hi bowlingforsoph!

A friendly uni would definitely be for you, I know because I was pretty much the same as well. Some things I would advise to look for are if your uni has a wellbeing team, any sort of support hotline, mental health services available, a personal academic tutor or some sort of buddy system. These things can all give insight into how they value their students and how they support you. Pay attention during the admissions process as well; do they reach out to you? Do they reply quickly and with a lot of information or is it slow/automated?

I was very nervous about going to uni and knew I definitely needed somewhere warm and welcoming. I chose University of Southampton because they had a lot of things I knew I could benefit from and even the things I didn't use, knowing they had them was very telling of how much they cared. So some examples are they have a 24/7 hotline that you can call to discuss anything, first year students get paired with a 2nd/3rd year buddy for my course (BA Geography), every student is assigned a Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) who is the first person you go to for any academic, financial, or wellbeing advice, they had a service where I could connect to current students on my course and ask questions and talk to them, and they also had services available to meet students at the airport and bring them back to campus.

Another example is University of Manchester, another uni I applied to, who mailed me a book with the best eats around campus and the city with price ranges, activities to do in the city and the halls and types of rooms they had available. This was really touching to me because I was an international student and they mailed it to me in my home country and it didn't just include campus activities or uni restaurants, but things to do and places to go in the city itself which, having never been, was all new for me and that book was a really nice introduction for an international student (it even had my name printed on it!).

So I suppose there are two suggestions for you, University of Southampton and University of Manchester! I didn't go uni of Manchester but I can say that University of Southampton is definitely warm, friendly and welcoming and it's one of the main reasons I chose to come here since it seemed more gentle than other unis that seemed a bit cold and disconnected during the admissions process. It's fairly large, but that definitely doesn't take away from how personal and attentive they are with their students. But of course, I can't tell you specifically where is welcoming and where isn't, so look out for some of the things I listed when applying for unis (you can check their website, email them or check other student forums where you can ask students there) to see what they have available.

Best of luck with choosing unis and I hope you find a university that suits you! If you have any more questions feel free to post them and I'll be happy to respond!

Jade
Official University of Southampton Rep
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Anonymous #1
#14
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#14
Lmao all the different uni ppl plugging their uni
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Anonymous #2
#15
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#15
(Original post by Anonymous)
Lmao all the different uni ppl plugging their uni
Enit 😂😂 i thought i was the only one who clocked
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Ghostlady
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#16
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#16
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Chester uni is split into different campuses, and english is at the parkgate road campus. I went with my year 12 daughter for animal behaviour and she loves it It is a bigger city, so if your not a fan of crowds, go at less peak times like first thing in the morning or later in the day, as they do have a lot of tourists. But parkgate road campus is smaller so its worth a visit.

Lancaster uni also does English as well. It is a bigger uni however its split into several colleges, each having their own halls. If you want your living space away from your 'work' then cartmel and lonsdale college south east campus would be one for you. Or if you dont want too many in your flat, then perhaps Furness College is a good shout. Lancaster is also a smaller city. My eldest studies there, so she chose Lancaster as opposed to a big city as she felt some where like manchester might be a bit overwhelming, so it was perfect for her. She now lives in the city for second year and feels comfortable, and thinks she could tackle a bigger city for postgrad.
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Anonymous #3
#17
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#17
(Original post by Anonymous)
Lmao all the different uni ppl plugging their uni
The Southampton rep recommending Southampton or MANCHESTER!!!! As “small” universities is ridiculous
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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#18
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#18
(Original post by nerdsciencefreak)
what was the interview process at portsmouth?
Hi! nerdsciencefreak

My course did not require an interview, so I'm not sure. It would be best to contact your course or the admissions team to find out if your course does interviews.

I hope this helps!
Best wishes
Chloe - Official student Rep
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ChichesterStuRep
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#19
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#19
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hi bowlingforsoph

Firstly, best of luck with your A levels!

I have just finished my first year at uni and I'm studying aat the University of Chichester. I felt similar to you when I was in year 12 and I think considering the size of the uni is a really important factor. I personally chose Chichester due to its small size because I felt it would help me get to know the lecturers better ( and they know me!) as the class sizes are relatively small. Also, the seminars take place in average classrooms and not a huge lecture hall which I found helped me with feeling less anxious as it didn't appear as daunting!

I would definitely recommend looking round unis that offer a course of interest to you so that you can try and get a feel for the place! Maybe look round a city uni as well as a campus uni and that will hopefully help you compare and to see which one you'd prefer (if you're not sure already)!

I hope this helps,
Abby, University of Chichester First Year Student Rep
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Coventry University Student Ambassadors
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#20
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#20
(Original post by bowlingforsoph )
Hi! I’m a year 12 looking into unis.

I want to do English language and literature (or something relatively similar, like just English), and I’m more than likely going to pursue a career in teaching secondary English. I’m predicted AAB-AAA, though I feel like I’ll probably end up with ABB.

I would prefer going to a university that is smaller in terms of the number of students, as I feel like it would better for me because of my anxiety. University would be a big enough step IMO, so I feel like a smaller one might be better for me. Not like an incredibly small uni. Just one that would be suited to my anxiety.

Of course, it’s not the only factor I would consider. I’d probably go to a bigger uni if I knew it was ‘friendlier’ and had an atmosphere that would be suited to my anxiety. And obviously I wouldn’t want to go somewhere that’s absolutely dead.

Any suggestions or related advice would be really appreciated!
Hey,

I have made a little list that I hope helps you - I have anxiety too so these are factors I think are important

Things to take into consideration:
- Class size: you can normally find this out on an open day by speaking to the lecturers. Just because it is a small uni, popular courses like English may not be small so its just worth checking
- Campus university or not: some universities are all on one campus, and some are spaced out, see what you prefer!
- Approachable lecturers: again, see whether students have a good relationship with the lecturers, for me, this is extremely important as I feel supported and comfortable in asking for help.
- Student well-being services: see whether your uni will support you and have the right services!

An open day really helped me in making my choice of university and I love it here - so I do recommend that you try visiting where possible!

I hope this helps and good luck
Sara
Coventry University Student Rep
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