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    (Original post by SunderX)
    He should be stuck in a youth institution until he's 18, like most other underage offenders, and have the opportunity to demonstrate sanity and remorse if he is to be released then.

    By the way, one accidental rifle shot can be construed as an accident (a la **** Cheney), but two is massacre.
    How many executions were there in China last year?
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    what the actual ****.
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    (Original post by Wobbles)
    Why? I could name at least 2 serial killers who murdered multiple people at young ages. One of those murdered his entire family when he was 12, was let off basically, then became San Fransico's biggest serial killer.
    What 2 serial killers are those, do they have names?

    I can think of a couple who haven't come out of puberty and become murderers again. The Jamie Bulger killers being very famous examples - note they were older than this kid, and tortured him before killing him, too.

    It needs to be decided on a case-by-case basis but I'm positive he shoudn't be put to death. I mean in a state where more or less every house has a gun - little kid, sees gun, recognises it as something that you point at people and pull - he could be unaware of the gravity of what he did, which would make it illegal to kill him; considering his age I think this could be a good argument for his lawyers.

    Arguing for it would be to say the 8 year old is aware of the nature of death, murder, and how to murder someone, and had it in his mind that he was going to murder his dad and his dad's friend [?]. Which considering his age, might be harder to prove....
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    the age of criminal responsibility is 10 so to try an 8 year old for murder would be impossible
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    (Original post by Rob McK)
    the age of criminal responsibility is 10 so to try an 8 year old for murder would be impossible
    Is it the same in the USA?

    Well, case-closed then. If it's federal law, there's no way that'll budge. If it is state law/statute law, it might be possible for them to push through new legislation....
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    (Original post by annarchy)
    What 2 serial killers are those, do they have names?
    Sure. David Carpenter (the Trailside Killer) for a start. He was abused; sent to live with his grand-parents; killed them as a teenager. Then when back home (and older) killed a whole load of female students, eventually killing his mum (who abused him).

    There are so many serial killers (or even just murderers) who were abused that it would be absurd to let this kid - who is suspected of being abused - go free into society again.
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    (Original post by Adam G Manning)
    How many executions were there in China last year?
    Waheeey, I have a Chinese flag on my profile, so it's time to drag in completely irrelevant political rigamorole eh? It doesn't matter at all that I have my own viewpoints independent of any government machine or, in fact you?

    And yes, the kid should be stuck in an institution. I never advocate the death penalty, because that's something you can never go back on.
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    (Original post by annarchy)
    Is it the same in the USA?

    Well, case-closed then. If it's federal law, there's no way that'll budge. If it is state law/statute law, it might be possible for them to push through new legislation....
    It's age 8 in Arizona, not 10.
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    (Original post by annarchy)
    Is it the same in the USA?

    Well, case-closed then. If it's federal law, there's no way that'll budge. If it is state law/statute law, it might be possible for them to push through new legislation....
    lol i was hoping nobody would test me on that, but to quote a study I just googled

    ( http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/osjcl/Artic...DF-4-11-05.pdf )

    in canada it's 12 and in most us states it's 16 or 18, so our UK age is pretty low. anyway, this seems to slam the door shut on the whole death row 8 year old argument!
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    (Original post by Rob McK)
    lol i was hoping nobody would test me on that, but to quote a study I just googled

    ( http://moritzlaw.osu.edu/osjcl/Artic...DF-4-11-05.pdf )

    in canada it's 12 and in most us states it's 16 or 18, so our UK age is pretty low. anyway, this seems to slam the door shut on the whole death row 8 year old argument!
    Did you read the article...?
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    (Original post by Wobbles)
    Did you read the article...?
    the article i posted the link to? yeah, just search for "USA" in the search function and you'll find the ages
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    (Original post by Rob McK)
    the article i posted the link to? yeah, just search for "USA" in the search function and you'll find the ages
    The article I posted. Can be tried from age 8. Also can be tried as an adult from age 8 in special circumstances.
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    (Original post by SunderX)
    Waheeey, I have a Chinese flag on my profile, so it's time to drag in completely irrelevant political rigamorole eh? It doesn't matter at all that I have my own viewpoints independent of any government machine or, in fact you?

    And yes, the kid should be stuck in an institution. I never advocate the death penalty, because that's something you can never go back on.
    Did I strike a chord?
    You delivered, internet style, thank you.
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    (Original post by Wobbles)
    Sure. David Carpenter (the Trailside Killer) for a start. He was abused; sent to live with his grand-parents; killed them as a teenager. Then when back home (and older) killed a whole load of female students, eventually killing his mum (who abused him).

    There are so many serial killers (or even just murderers) who were abused that it would be absurd to let this kid - who is suspected of being abused - go free into society again.
    I can't find a single article that says or even suggests he killed his grandparents. You are misinformed. He first killed in his thirties, then was released, then killed again.
    I think who you ARE thinking about is Edmund Kemper, who by the way is still the only child-killer who then reoffended that I can find.

    There are so many serial killers (or even just murderers) who were abused that it would be absurd to let this kid - who is suspected of being abused - go free into society again.
    Are you serious? Abused kids should be locked up because there is a correlation between abused kids and serial killers/murderers? :nah: Nope. Bad idea. Lots of abused kids DO NOT become murderers so that can't be used as an excuse to lock them up.
    And not all murderers/serial killers were abused:
    You should watch Inside The Criminal Mind [or something close] on Discovery, it's fascinating. And it taught me that there is no known cause for what pathological murderers/serial killers do. They tend to come from a variety of backgrounds, are usually male (and in the US middle-class), etc. Other than that, some were abused, some weren't. Some killed animals growing up, some didn't. Some are well educated, some aren't.

    There was a study into this certain part of the brain that showed no reaction to things that made "normal" people feel love or anger or passion in psychopaths. That's about it. And if we're talking about taking away a Human Right (to freedom) from a victim of abuse, we should make sure we have hard evidence, imo.
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    Why not execute him? I don't think for a second age absolves someone of their actions. At age eight you can tell the difference between right and wrong, fathom the consequences of your actions.
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    (Original post by Wobbles)
    I'm not seeing your point. Child murderers are much more likely than others to kill again. Killing one to possibly save another is a good thing,
    We're all capable of murder, especially when it's a crime of passion. Does that mean I'd be okay to go have some fun with automatic weapons in a packed shopping centre? Seriously, the suggestion that you can know that a young child is going to commit a crime in later life with enough certainty to justify permanently extinguishing them is insane.

    (Original post by Wobbles)
    and at worst, still a good thing since he killed 2 people. Get it?
    I'd like to think we've collectively moved on from the barbarity of "an eye for an eye", but then people like you keep popping up to prove me wrong... *sigh*
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    (Original post by Wobbles)
    The article I posted. Can be tried from age 8. Also can be tried as an adult from age 8 in special circumstances.
    just had a gander, personally i'd say they probably won't take it to court as no jury would convict an 8 year old - even an american jury, although in fairness post-obama win i have slightly more respect for the average american - also the fact they interviewed him without his parents (obviously) or an attorney means that the case could be on dodgy legal ground. he won't be jailed and definitely won't be killed!
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    (Original post by Blátönn)
    Why not execute him? I don't think for a second age absolves someone of their actions.
    incredible quote from you, how far would you extend that principle?
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    (Original post by annarchy)
    I can't find a single article that says or even suggests he killed his grandparents. You are misinformed. He first killed in his thirties, then was released, then killed again.


    Are you serious? Abused kids should be locked up because there is a correlation between abused kids and serial killers/murderers? :nah: Nope. Bad idea. Lots of abused kids DO NOT become murderers so that can't be used as an excuse to lock them up.
    And not all murderers/serial killers were abused:
    You should watch Inside The Criminal Mind [or something close] on Discovery, it's fascinating. And it taught me that there is no known cause for what pathological murderers/serial killers do. They tend to come from a variety of backgrounds, are usually male (and in the US middle-class), etc. Other than that, some were abused, some weren't. Some killed animals growing up, some didn't. Some are well educated, some aren't.

    There was a study into this certain part of the brain that showed no reaction to things that made "normal" people feel love or anger or passion in psychopaths. That's about it. And if we're talking about taking away a Human Right (to freedom) from a victim of abuse, we should make sure we have hard evidence, imo.
    First, considering I have 2 books that talk about this case, both by ex-FBI agents, and they both say the same thing, I think they are more reliable than random Internet articles (he done the murders before the web even existed ffs!). And yes, I just checked one of them to confirm I had the right name.

    Second, I never said all abused kids should be locked up. Where on earth did you get that? You took my comment WAY out of context. Desperation, much?

    Third, if a much higher proportion of killers came from 'bad' backgrounds - i.e. abuse - than the general population, studies go out of the window. This is real life, not analyzing questionnaires ffs.
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    (Original post by Wobbles)
    It's age 8 in Arizona, not 10.
    Aha but you see State Law is a lot easier to overturn than federal law, so it might be possible for his lawyers to argue he is not mature enough to know the true nature of his crime.
    Considering so many other countries & states have older ages of criminal responsibility, I should think his lawyers would use a lot of the evidence documented in those states/countries to argue their point.

    It's not at all easy to change state law but it's much more likely in that case. We'll see.
 
 
 
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