mdbdidjdksnd
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Do members of the same species have the same genes? If not then what do they have in common in terms of genetic info?
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Redmed_
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(Original post by mdbdidjdksnd)
Do members of the same species have the same genes? If not then what do they have in common in terms of genetic info?
No, all members of the same species will not have the same genes (meaning the same genetic information which is then to be expressed), well otherwise we would all be identical to each other. However, if you ask whether members of the same species would have same types of genes that govern core physiological functions then yes. Members of the same species will have the similar types of genetic material, i.e. DNA or RNA and would also have same types of genes that support their body plans and nutrition, although through various processes like genetic drift, mutation, natural selection species tend to make developmental changes to their genetic make up to adapt to their unstable environments. This in turn gives rise to several alleles for the same gene which then manipulates into different phenotypes and to support new plans for adaptation. For every gene we receive one half of the alleles from both parents to complete our genetic makeup.

Also just an extra piece of info, genes are maintained over an organism's evolution, however, genes can also be exchanged or "stolen" from other organisms. Bacteria can exchange plasmids carrying antibiotic resistance genes through conjugation, and viruses can insert their genes into host cells. Some mammalian genes have also been adopted by viruses and later passed onto other mammalian hosts. Regardless of how an organism gets and retains a gene, regions essential for the correct function of the protein are always conserved. Some mutations can accumulate in non-essential regions; these mutations are an overall history of the evolutionary life of a gene.
Last edited by Redmed_; 4 weeks ago
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