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    Hey everyone!

    I'm taking History at HL on the IB.

    Really enjoying it. But because I didn't take GCSE History, i'm so crap at writing essays and knowing how to structure it.

    I'm taking HL History, because I realise that its important to know about the events that shaped the world, so I can have a bit of context for university!

    Any tips??
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    I'm in the position of choosing A levels or IB. Because my school just opened a new sixth form that does IB and not A levels. Can someone help me make my mind up. What's more easier and what's more beneficial?
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    I'd make a separate thread for that GFX-K! But you should take the IB! Its awesome! My college does both, and the IB students are all awesome and you make friends really quickly.
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    I'm also taking HL History!!
    Although I'm not very good at it (Bad memory...)
    But just try to look at different areas in your essays... if that makes any sense...
    >_<
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    that should help http://www.activehistory.co.uk/ib-hi...ing_skills.pdf
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    Thanks everyone!
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    (Original post by amazingelli)
    Hey everyone!

    I'm taking History at HL on the IB.

    Really enjoying it. But because I didn't take GCSE History, i'm so crap at writing essays and knowing how to structure it.

    I'm taking HL History, because I realise that its important to know about the events that shaped the world, so I can have a bit of context for university!

    Any tips??
    It's great you're enjoying the subject, keep at it, and once you've got writing essays to a tee, all you need is to learn the context and facts like you say!

    Here is some guidance:

    Your introduction should introduce your factors, of what you will be talking about. It should also give a brief contextual overview of what was happening at the time, and how this relates to your essay. You could also briefly suggest the ambiguities of the question, and how this affects what you are writing, to be expanded on later.

    The main body should explain each of your factors for the question and analyse how important or not they were in affecting what the question is asking. It should be supported by statistics, dates and events which support your judgement. You should also include the opposite point of view, and explain how people may think that something else was the case, to show a balanced argument. As mentioned before, you can also pick up on the ambiguity of a question and explain how you are answering it, and what you take certain words to mean in what context. Within a paragraph, be sure to inter-link between factors and explain how one is more important than another. By inter-linking, you show your knowledge of the broader historical implications, rather than just focusing narrowly on one part at a time.

    You should sign-post your sentences - i.e. start with "Economics was an important factor in..." and end with "so we can see how economics affected the...". This way, if an examiner reads your essay, they can see from the first and last sentences of every paragraph that you have an argument in form. This bit is the bone of your argument, the analytical structure running through the piece. The meat is the statistics, dates and events that you use to support what you say. This meat and bone thing is quite good for remembering how your essay should be structured, and what must be included.

    Your conclusion should 'conclude' everything you have said in the essay and bring about your judgement on the question along with support. It is good to have supported your argument, but you should not introduce anything new into the conclusion that you haven't talked about in your argument. For one, it is bad practise as the conclusion is a referral to everything you have said before, and two it makes the essay look unplanned and that you haven't considered everything before, and have just put in an afterthought. As in the main body, you include the opposite view, and explain how it could be thought of this way, but then in the conclusion you are telling the examiner why your idea is better overall than opposite ones. To do this, you explain your viewpoint and back it up with "meat" and explain why you think it is better than an opposite thought. It is quite alright to use your opinion in a conclusion as long as it is supported by something. Stylistically, refrain from saying "I think that" and use such like "this argument is more accurate" to explain your point of view.

    Stylistically, make sure spelling punctuation and grammar are all fine, along with sentences that are long and may not read too well. Not stuffing your essay with dates and facts is good as well, because otherwise you become narrative and lose the analytical side, rather, you should just include a date or fact when necessary to support something you are explaining.

    Hope this helps!
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    judgment judgment judgment judgment judgment!!!!
    details details details details details!!!

    where
    judgment = constantly be analyzing, linking to topic sentence, thesis and question, arguing your point of view
    details = names, dates, things you won't get from class but from further reading... but don't let your detail be superfluous! nothing about say hitler's childhood... as long as you're reasonable

    got those into your head, and display them throughout and you have a 7*



    *disclaimer: provided to you argue something reasonable and write well (good language, but not flowery)
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    hello everyone,
    i was wondering if any of you know an internet page that contents some examples of perfect history essays ?
    some of the topics are just so difficult. thanks
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    if you find one, lemme know :p:
    :rolleyes:
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    thank you thank you!!!
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    (Original post by GFX-K)
    I'm in the position of choosing A levels or IB. Because my school just opened a new sixth form that does IB and not A levels. Can someone help me make my mind up. What's more easier and what's more beneficial?
    If it's at all convenient/possible, I wouldn't touch a new IB school with a ten-foot yardstick. There are lots of finer details of how the IB works that can take a school a few years to work out, so I wouldn't subject myself to being the lab rat if I had the choice! Though putting in extra work can negate the effects of lousy school, as always.

    A Levels are arguably easier as you study a smaller range of subjects and the pressure's not as great due to the modular system.
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    (Original post by Agneisse)
    I wouldn't touch a new IB school with a ten-foot yardstick.

    compleetely agreed! :yep:
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    (Original post by GFX-K)
    I'm in the position of choosing A levels or IB. Because my school just opened a new sixth form that does IB and not A levels. Can someone help me make my mind up. What's more easier and what's more beneficial?
    IB is a killer. You have to do subjects that you don't like (unless you're a super-nerd). Save yourself from eternal mental torture by doing A-levels.

    But there is an advantage of the IB. Although universities are more lenient towards A-level students (in my opinion), the IB prepares you much better for university and life itself. Not that this would matter at all.
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    (Original post by Adalia)
    compleetely agreed! :yep:
    And yes, I would have to agree with this too! :yep:
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    (Original post by Sagittarius_GBR)
    It's great you're enjoying the subject, keep at it, and once you've got writing essays to a tee, all you need is to learn the context and facts like you say!

    Here is some guidance:

    Your introduction should introduce your factors, of what you will be talking about. It should also give a brief contextual overview of what was happening at the time, and how this relates to your essay. You could also briefly suggest the ambiguities of the question, and how this affects what you are writing, to be expanded on later.

    The main body should explain each of your factors for the question and analyse how important or not they were in affecting what the question is asking. It should be supported by statistics, dates and events which support your judgement. You should also include the opposite point of view, and explain how people may think that something else was the case, to show a balanced argument. As mentioned before, you can also pick up on the ambiguity of a question and explain how you are answering it, and what you take certain words to mean in what context. Within a paragraph, be sure to inter-link between factors and explain how one is more important than another. By inter-linking, you show your knowledge of the broader historical implications, rather than just focusing narrowly on one part at a time.

    You should sign-post your sentences - i.e. start with "Economics was an important factor in..." and end with "so we can see how economics affected the...". This way, if an examiner reads your essay, they can see from the first and last sentences of every paragraph that you have an argument in form. This bit is the bone of your argument, the analytical structure running through the piece. The meat is the statistics, dates and events that you use to support what you say. This meat and bone thing is quite good for remembering how your essay should be structured, and what must be included.

    Your conclusion should 'conclude' everything you have said in the essay and bring about your judgement on the question along with support. It is good to have supported your argument, but you should not introduce anything new into the conclusion that you haven't talked about in your argument. For one, it is bad practise as the conclusion is a referral to everything you have said before, and two it makes the essay look unplanned and that you haven't considered everything before, and have just put in an afterthought. As in the main body, you include the opposite view, and explain how it could be thought of this way, but then in the conclusion you are telling the examiner why your idea is better overall than opposite ones. To do this, you explain your viewpoint and back it up with "meat" and explain why you think it is better than an opposite thought. It is quite alright to use your opinion in a conclusion as long as it is supported by something. Stylistically, refrain from saying "I think that" and use such like "this argument is more accurate" to explain your point of view.

    Stylistically, make sure spelling punctuation and grammar are all fine, along with sentences that are long and may not read too well. Not stuffing your essay with dates and facts is good as well, because otherwise you become narrative and lose the analytical side, rather, you should just include a date or fact when necessary to support something you are explaining.

    Hope this helps!
    Excellent reply.
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    Thank you so much!!!
    I think I'll soon have good essays(my friend will send them to me, he got 7 on HL History).
    If you guys want one, message me and I'll send it as soon as I get it.
    x
 
 
 
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