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mcq gcse biology

What is not a reason for having conservation programmes?
A) Introducing species to new environments
B) Maintaining resources
C) Protecting vulnerable environments
D) Reducing extinction
The answer is A but how isn't introducing species to new environments not a reason of carrying out conservation programmes. Let's say a specific specie isn't doing well in its habitat and its numbers are decreasing, wouldn't we want to conserve this specie then introduce it to a new environment so that it can adapt and start reproducing if you get my idea?
Also can someone explain how maintaining resources is a reason?
Reply 1
We are talking about conserving. New species is not conserving
Reply 2
Original post by Anamps
We are talking about conserving. New species is not conserving

But the question didn't say new species it said new environments
Reply 3
Original post by Nasa1726
But the question didn't say new species it said new environments


You conserve what is there
Reply 4
Original post by Anamps
You conserve what is there


oh
I get where you're coming from, but the question is asking reasons for carrying out conservation programmes, not methods of conservation (e.g. if you transfer a vulnerable species to a zoo; the reason you're doing that is to protect the species). Maintaining environments and protecting vulnerable species will reduce the liklihood of extinction, which is the primary goal of a conservation programme. Introducing species to new environments isn't directly related to conservation; in fact, if the species you introduce ends up thriving "too much" in its new environment and outcompetes native species then you might actually end up destabilising that ecosystem.

For your second question, some species may have very narrow niches and require specific resources from their environment. Therefore, it's critical to maintain all the natural resources in an environment to allow all native species to thrive. When resources are in short supply, that's when selection pressure kicks in and extinction rates increase.
Reply 6
Original post by HarisMalik98
I get where you're coming from, but the question is asking reasons for carrying out conservation programmes, not methods of conservation (e.g. if you transfer a vulnerable species to a zoo; the reason you're doing that is to protect the species). Maintaining environments and protecting vulnerable species will reduce the liklihood of extinction, which is the primary goal of a conservation programme. Introducing species to new environments isn't directly related to conservation; in fact, if the species you introduce ends up thriving "too much" in its new environment and outcompetes native species then you might actually end up destabilising that ecosystem.

For your second question, some species may have very narrow niches and require specific resources from their environment. Therefore, it's critical to maintain all the natural resources in an environment to allow all native species to thrive. When resources are in short supply, that's when selection pressure kicks in and extinction rates increase.

Thank you so much :smile:, I def get it now

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