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No Spam Please
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What is the difference between *among* and *amongst*? Where should they be used? Please suggest me
illustrative examples.
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Cybercypher
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"no spam please" <[email protected] ell.com> burbled
news:[email protected]:

[q1]> What is the difference between *among* and *amongst*? Where should they be used? Please suggest me[/q1]
[q1]> illustrative examples.[/q1]

Use the former when writing and speaking American English, and the latter when not. They mean the
same thing. Your choice.

--
Franke: Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the
written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
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Dave Swindell
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In article <[email protected]>, Einde O'Callaghan
<[email protected]> writes
[q1]>CyberCypher wrote:[/q1]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> "no spam please" <[email protected] ell.com> burbled[/q2]
[q2]>> news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > What is the difference between *among* and *amongst*? Where should they be used? Please suggest[/q2]
[q2]>> > me illustrative examples.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Use the former when writing and speaking American English, and the latter when not. They mean the[/q2]
[q2]>> same thing. Your choice.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q1]>You can safely use "among" while speaking British English, too. I always tend to think of "amongst"[/q1]
[q1]>as a bit old-fashioned and formal.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
Unlike "while" and "whilst" where the meanings are more than just subtly different, though you can
get away with "while" every time. Perhaps this is where the "st" in "amongst" came from in some dim,
recent past.

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Dave OSOS#24 [email protected] Remove my gerbil for email replies

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Forever After
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"CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
[q1]> "no spam please" <[email protected] ell.com> burbled[/q1]
[q1]> news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > What is the difference between *among* and *amongst*? Where should they be used? Please suggest[/q2]
[q2]> > me illustrative examples.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Use the former when writing and speaking American English, and the latter when not. They mean the[/q1]
[q1]> same thing. Your choice.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]

What's the choice? To speak American English or not? If that were a choice, no one would need
English lessons!

[q1]> --[/q1]
[q1]> Franke: Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules for the[/q1]
[q1]> written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.[/q1]
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Einde O'Callagh
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CyberCypher wrote:
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "no spam please" <[email protected] ell.com> burbled[/q1]
[q1]> news:[email protected]:[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q2]> > What is the difference between *among* and *amongst*? Where should they be used? Please suggest[/q2]
[q2]> > me illustrative examples.[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Use the former when writing and speaking American English, and the latter when not. They mean the[/q1]
[q1]> same thing. Your choice.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
You can safely use "among" while speaking British English, too. I always tend to think of "amongst"
as a bit old-fashioned and formal.

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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Cybercypher
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#6
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"Forever After" <[email protected]> burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "CyberCypher" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...[/q1]
[q2]>> "no spam please" <[email protected] ell.com> burbled[/q2]
[q2]>> news:[email protected]:[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> > What is the difference between *among* and *amongst*? Where should they be used? Please suggest[/q2]
[q2]>> > me illustrative examples.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q2]>> Use the former when writing and speaking American English, and the latter when not. They mean the[/q2]
[q2]>> same thing. Your choice.[/q2]
[q2]>>[/q2]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> What's the choice? To speak American English or not? If that were a choice, no one would need[/q1]
[q1]> English lessons![/q1]

Sure they would. Especially people like yourself, who need English lessons to learn how to say
things that mean something.

--
Franke: " " Gess Hoo. Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal rules
for the written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
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