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    (Original post by laura130490)
    I just applied through NHS jobs The application process is so much easier, the only thing I worry about is that for some positions it asks if you can speak Welsh, and I wonder if not being able to puts you at a disadvantage?
    Cool cool. Yeah I noticed this too, I only looked at the one for clinical biochem in Cardiff and it seemed to be saying that it is advantageous if you can speak it. I hope that it won't be but I can see them having a preference for someone who can. Though how often you'd need to speak Welsh I have no idea, it seem slightly odd.
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    (Original post by laura130490)
    I agree, I completed mine early because I know when they've advertised trainee clinical scientist posts on the NHS they've taken them down after as little as 2 days because of how many applications they received. So I thought getting it in early might give me an advantage, but it doesn't seem like it with this scheme. I wish I would have waited longer, done some practice tests and found some more info out before applying. I suppose nothing we can do now though, let's just hope our applications were good enough.

    I was wondering, it says that applicants should request an informal visit to one of the labs before the interview stage, but I've already worked in a NHS lab for a year and shadowed clinical scientists. I've also got a week's worth of work experience in 3 different labs and I visited another lab two weeks ago as part of my final year project, do I still need to arrange a visit? :confused:
    i remember reading about arranging an informal visit. but i cannot recall where. would you be able to direct me to the relevant webpage that states it.
    thanks
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    "Dear Candidate

    Thank you for your recent application for the NHS Scientist Training Programme. I
    have some potentially good news for you.

    Having reviewed the number of applications we have received for the Medical Physics
    Theme we have decided to review the benchmark used for the Logical Reasoning Online
    Test. For this theme ONLY we have decided to lower the benchmark which means you
    have now made it through to the next stage of the process.

    The next stage involves your application form being reviewed by a panel of NHS
    Scientists to decide if you are suitable to be shortlisted to attend an interview.

    If you no longer wish to be considered for the Programme please contact us as soon
    as possible and we will remove your application from the process.

    I apologise for any inconvenience this may have caused you and I wish you luck with
    your application."

    What the ...!? I just interviewed for a lower paid position in Canterbury, which I was really excited about. Now I'm confused again, but I guess it's a good thing.
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    Of course it's great news, congratulations.

    What was your location preference?
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    London and then locations around the south but I can't remember what order.
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    I guess that's good news for every applying to Medical Physics there then!
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    (Original post by beckster824)
    Cool cool. Yeah I noticed this too, I only looked at the one for clinical biochem in Cardiff and it seemed to be saying that it is advantageous if you can speak it. I hope that it won't be but I can see them having a preference for someone who can. Though how often you'd need to speak Welsh I have no idea, it seem slightly odd.
    Yeah I've applied for that post and an audiology one, don't think my degree is relevant for that though, but thought I would give it a try anyway. Exactly, I'm sure most people in Wales can't even speak Welsh and everyone who can speak Welsh presumably can speak English as well, so I really don't understand why being able to speak Welsh puts you at an advantage :confused:

    (Original post by gosrani)
    i remember reading about arranging an informal visit. but i cannot recall where. would you be able to direct me to the relevant webpage that states it.
    thanks
    I can't remember where I read it either, a guy at my uni mentioned it as well. I know the NHS recruitment twitter page they were giving details of lab visits and said that you could contact one of the trusts you've applied to for more details. But I don't know if this is necessary if you've already got lab experience and have worked with clinical scientists :confused:
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    (Original post by gazette)
    I also answered all the questions as well (I screen-capped them for future practice while taking them). Quickly, but AFTER the test unfortunately.
    She didn't practice because she did NOT KNOW about the nature of them and she only learnt about the scheme only a few days before the deadline. She only trusted the suggested online ones which were very easy. Same for all of my friends. I got the impression you already said you had encountered such tests in the past (and sometimes more difficult) hence you DID have a better idea about their nature at least. We never had (perhaps because we studied high-school/college abroad).
    How did you not say that? :confused: This is your exact quote: "Personally I don't think this test does anything to determine whether you will be a good scientist, but what it does test you on is your motivation." (And the rest of your post obviously). Motivation = wanting something enough and driving you towards it. So, lack of motivation = lack of preparation = fail. Therefore: failure = not wanting it enough (no motivation). That's what I gathered.
    Well it might have seemed that way, but the exact wording of your quote (which you put into quotation marks" were not the same, I guess my statement had an ambiguous meaning, theres your interpretation, and what I attempted to convey, which was that it tested how much effort or time someone is willing to put in (as opposed to their motivation for wanting to apply to the programme).
    But nevertheless, it is true that the maths is really what 11 year olds learn, and in fact, msot adults can't do these simple calculations, as seen by people here and this link:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-17224600

    or here:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-17240291
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    How essential are the lab visits? I'm not in the UK and so flying over just for a one-day visit when I'm on a student budget (i.e. have absolutely no money) and in the middle of both my masters thesis and phd courses just isn't feasible.

    I had a tour around my local blood transfusion labs during my undergraduate degree and got to talk with the head clinical scientist about the career, but that was nearly six years ago now. I mentioned it in my application but I'm concerned that it's not enough.

    Any ideas?
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    (Original post by laura130490)
    Yeah I've applied for that post and an audiology one, don't think my degree is relevant for that though, but thought I would give it a try anyway. Exactly, I'm sure most people in Wales can't even speak Welsh and everyone who can speak Welsh presumably can speak English as well, so I really don't understand why being able to speak Welsh puts you at an advantage :confused:
    The only reason I can think that they're doing it is to try and bring back the language because I read somewhere about a development programme, or perhaps maybe they would rather take on someone from Wales. I saw the audiology one too but I didn't think there was any point in applying seeing as its got nothing to do with my degree
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    (Original post by Mochi)
    How essential are the lab visits? I'm not in the UK and so flying over just for a one-day visit when I'm on a student budget (i.e. have absolutely no money) and in the middle of both my masters thesis and phd courses just isn't feasible.

    I had a tour around my local blood transfusion labs during my undergraduate degree and got to talk with the head clinical scientist about the career, but that was nearly six years ago now. I mentioned it in my application but I'm concerned that it's not enough.

    Any ideas?
    I think its just so that you can get an idea of what you may be doing, if its the right job for you etc. However when I went to my local hospital department she told me that it was good to try and visit as many as possible so that you introduce yourself to those who could be involved in looking at the applicants so if they see your name they may think.. 'Oh I remember Mochi, they seemed to be [good qualities] they good be a very good candidate...'
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    I know someone already asked on the previous page but just to refresh the question:

    Has anyone applied for the scheme in Scotland this year? I applied last year through the NHS Recruitment ad and have therefore been checking there every day but I've just found this:

    http://www.nes.scot.nhs.uk/education...ists-2012.aspx

    I was wondering if anyone could shed any more light? I'd be gutted if I've missed it. I have applied to the English scheme but I was one of the 10 shortlisted for interview in Scotland for Micro last year and I was hoping I'd done enough over the past year to make it through this time.
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    I think applications for the Scottish scheme closed on 24th Feb...I know that was the case for the Bioengineering and Medical physics specialties anyway...
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    Hey guys. I apologise if this question has already been asked, but there are 166 pages and that's a lot to read, haha. I used the search function but couldn't find anything, so here goes...

    I'm only in my first year of university but I think that the STP is something I definitely want to do once I've finished with my degree. I'd like to start working toward building my CV up so that when I apply it'll look favourable, but I have no idea where to start. I've done work experience in other professions but I have no clue what kind of things would be beneficial in the medical area. I'm thinking about contacting local hospitals to see if they take volunteers (even if it is for small tasks) but I'm thinking it's gonna be unlikely.

    Anyone got any ideas as to the kind of thing I could do to build up my CV? (Other than getting a first class degree, hah.) I know I've got 2 years to do this but I've got nothing to do over the summer so I was hoping to do something worthwhile during that time. Any ideas would be appreciated.
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    (Original post by k3ro)
    Anyone got any ideas as to the kind of thing I could do to build up my CV? (Other than getting a first class degree, hah.) I know I've got 2 years to do this but I've got nothing to do over the summer so I was hoping to do something worthwhile during that time. Any ideas would be appreciated.
    I doubt there's any need to get a first. As long as you get a 2:1 other things will become more important. Now the rest of it depends on what you're applying for, as I've seen medical physics must be less competitive than the medicine/biology allied subjects. Also, it's highly likely that the recruitment system could change between now and then.

    Practise aptitude test every so often to get used to them, try to get to the point where you'll actually finish with spare time! The ones they used this year were numerical and logical reasoning, so simple (but very time limited) maths questions on sets of data and "what's the missing part of the series" pictures like you get in IQ tests. This is important, you don't want to fall at the first (stupid) hurdle.

    Get to a hospital department related to what you want to do. A visit is fine but a stay would be useful. Don't just use it as a cv filler, that's not the hard part. Go home and look up everything you've seen and find out what it does. Look at who the clinical scientists work with.

    Get to know the subject you want to study very well. You don't remotely need to do a masters or phd but some of the people you compete with will have these so you need to know the subject (almost) as well as they might.

    Get leadership experience of some sort so you can talk about how you have lead a group to important decisions, dealt with setbacks, dealt with stress etc.

    Get an idea of how you'd like your career to progress. Get some experience of interviews, ask the uni careers service for one or consider applying for something you don't actually want but could get to interview for.
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    (Original post by stawbelly)
    I think applications for the Scottish scheme closed on 24th Feb...I know that was the case for the Bioengineering and Medical physics specialties anyway...
    thanks.
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    so I tried to contact my first choice for the STP to arrange a visit. After several holds and transfers and a call back, they stated that they had no idea what I was on about as they had never heard of the scheme or the fact that they had a post available. They sounded so suspicious on the fone like I was trying to flog them rotten cheese or something....I double checked again and again on the NHS lists and not only were they listed, I chose them as my first choice from the drop down list on my application. Now all I can think is WTF!:confused:
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    You only tried phoning? An email to a targeted member of staff might prove more fruitful.
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    That is seriously odd. I was going to suggest try emailing as well
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    (Original post by nisot)
    so I tried to contact my first choice for the STP to arrange a visit. After several holds and transfers and a call back, they stated that they had no idea what I was on about as they had never heard of the scheme or the fact that they had a post available. They sounded so suspicious on the fone like I was trying to flog them rotten cheese or something....I double checked again and again on the NHS lists and not only were they listed, I chose them as my first choice from the drop down list on my application. Now all I can think is WTF!:confused:
    That's very odd, did you definitely phone the right department? I know it sounds stupid but I used to go through to switchboard when I worked in a hospital and ask to be put through to cytogenetics and nine times out of ten they'd put me through to cytology.
 
 
 
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