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    (Original post by mateyface)
    The Christie do a few summer placements each summer. Advertised around May/June I think.
    Thanks, I had a look at their website the other day and they're semi local to me so I'll read up a bit more on them.
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    Argh, getting stressed about accommodation!
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    (Original post by spam88)
    Argh, getting stressed about accommodation!
    Living or University accomodation?
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    Living. I managed to get through to the staff accommodation people today, and they said my request's been approved and I can collect my keys from security from 6pm the night before I start. But apparently that's all the information I get... Now I'm imagining shared dorms, not enough room for my stuff, and only being allowed to stay a week lol. I might have to pester the accommodation lady a little more.
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    Pestering done. I feel much better now
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    I have a question for everyone here;

    Having a look around the internet for information on being a 'medical physicist' brings up a lot and there seems to be a number of slightly different career paths or specialties that the initial training scheme can get you on to, and as I understand it, some specializing in certain areas on the STP as well (in different areas of medical physics?). As I'm reading some conflicting and broken information on the net, could anyone on here just list exactly what those different fields are (and maybe what they involve)? I'm reading a lot of mention of radiology, ionising/non ionising beam stuff, ultrasound, magnetic resonance etc...and it's hard to tell which are actual whole fields and which are just parts of what certain people do and stuff

    EDIT: Also, how many people go into this field without a PhD? it's not listed as a requirement but it seems a lot of people do, and would not having a PhD be a major disadvantage? (I have also seen that a lot of people do a PhD during/after qualification, which I'd be more open to depending on circumstances).
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    (Original post by heyimbored)
    I have a question for everyone here;

    Having a look around the internet for information on being a 'medical physicist' brings up a lot and there seems to be a number of slightly different career paths or specialties that the initial training scheme can get you on to, and as I understand it, some specializing in certain areas on the STP as well (in different areas of medical physics?). As I'm reading some conflicting and broken information on the net, could anyone on here just list exactly what those different fields are (and maybe what they involve)? I'm reading a lot of mention of radiology, ionising/non ionising beam stuff, ultrasound, magnetic resonance etc...and it's hard to tell which are actual whole fields and which are just parts of what certain people do and stuff

    EDIT: Also, how many people go into this field without a PhD? it's not listed as a requirement but it seems a lot of people do, and would not having a PhD be a major disadvantage? (I have also seen that a lot of people do a PhD during/after qualification, which I'd be more open to depending on circumstances).
    The Medical Physics STP theme has several specialisms, these are:
    Imaging with Ionising Radiation (Xray, CT, PET...)
    Imaging with Non-Ionising Radiation (Ultrasound, MRI, optical)
    Radiotherapy Physics (radiotherapy linacs usually for cancer)
    Raditation Safety. (obvious)

    Two others are mentioned on some NHS sites (clinical measurement and ICT) although these no longer seem to be specialisms, and are incorporated in to the general placement curriculum.

    Every Medical Physics trainee will complete work experience and training in all four specialisms before focussing on just one towards the end of the placement.

    This is a link to useful stuff

    Some people apply to the STP having already completed a PhD, some don't. I've been given a position starting next month, and of the four medical physicists starting, none have completed PhDs.
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    (Original post by zeropoint)
    The Medical Physics STP theme has several specialisms, these are:
    Imaging with Ionising Radiation (Xray, CT, PET...)
    Imaging with Non-Ionising Radiation (Ultrasound, MRI, optical)
    Radiotherapy Physics (radiotherapy linacs usually for cancer)
    Raditation Safety. (obvious)

    Two others are mentioned on some NHS sites (clinical measurement and ICT) although these no longer seem to be specialisms, and are incorporated in to the general placement curriculum.

    Every Medical Physics trainee will complete work experience and training in all four specialisms before focussing on just one towards the end of the placement.

    This is a link to useful stuff

    Some people apply to the STP having already completed a PhD, some don't. I've been given a position starting next month, and of the four medical physicists starting, none have completed PhDs.
    Thanks, that's cleared some things up. Having read back in the thread a bit the medical physics route seems to be less competitive than the other themes that use the STP, which is always nice to hear.

    I've been having a look around for information on salaries and stuff once qualified, what kind of job titles exactly could you get at the end of the medical physics training? I've seen a lot of radiology vacancies but will the imaging specialisms lead more to different jobs?
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    (Original post by heyimbored)
    I've been having a look around for information on salaries and stuff once qualified, what kind of job titles exactly could you get at the end of the medical physics training? I've seen a lot of radiology vacancies but will the imaging specialisms lead more to different jobs?
    Radiologist is usually the person who interprets the scans and writes the final report. Its a medical specialism like surgery or neurology, and not really open to us mere physicists.

    Medical physicists grow up to be clinical scientists, with some options leading to to management, should you desire.
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    (Original post by zeropoint)
    Radiologist is usually the person who interprets the scans and writes the final report. Its a medical specialism like surgery or neurology, and not really open to us mere physicists.

    Medical physicists grow up to be clinical scientists, with some options leading to to management, should you desire.
    Hi

    I'm thinking of going into clinical science as well, through the medical physics theme, I'm not sure about the salary and career path though.

    There's the STP training scheme first which is 2 (or 3?) years? How much money do you earn here?

    Then you do a couple of years in a kind of supervised work environment? Which is a bit higher paid?

    Then when you become a full medical physicist and go to work as a clinical scientist somewhere, how much can you earn then? I've read about becoming a consultant as well, which is obviously the top of the chain, how would you get to that point and how long would it take?

    Sorry for all the questions, I've only just started looking at it and it looks interesting but I'm not sure if the salaries are quite high enough for me; I know they're good but I keep reading that there are very few medical physicists who earn any more than about £40k, and I'd quite like to have a bit more earning potential than that.
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    (Original post by zeropoint)
    Radiologist is usually the person who interprets the scans and writes the final report. Its a medical specialism like surgery or neurology, and not really open to us mere physicists.

    Medical physicists grow up to be clinical scientists, with some options leading to to management, should you desire.
    Ah yes, is radiography open to medical physicists? From what I gather that's also something with a standalone qualification and training. There are so many different fields with such similar names, it's hard to tell what's what! Looking into clinical scientist careers has cleared things up a bit though, although even then there's clinical scientists who specialize in biological type stuff and all kinds of things, I suppose I just need to sift through it and keep what's relevant.
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    (Original post by heyimbored)
    Ah yes, is radiography open to medical physicists? From what I gather that's also something with a standalone qualification and training. There are so many different fields with such similar names, it's hard to tell what's what! Looking into clinical scientist careers has cleared things up a bit though, although even then there's clinical scientists who specialize in biological type stuff and all kinds of things, I suppose I just need to sift through it and keep what's relevant.
    A radiographer is a standalone qualification, usually taken as an undergraduate degree.

    My way of thinking about it is:
    A radiographer does the scan, a radiologist interprets the scan, the medical physicist makes sure the scan shows what it needs to.
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    (Original post by Lincolner)

    I've read about becoming a consultant as well, which is obviously the top of the chain, how would you get to that point and how long would it take?

    I keep reading that there are very few medical physicists who earn any more than about £40k, and I'd quite like to have a bit more earning potential than that.
    My deputy head of department left university 18 years ago so that gives you an idea of how long to work up - this is nhs pay band 8c which is £55k - £67k (bit more in London).

    IPEM say the majority of nhs medical physicists reach pay band 8b which is £45k-£56k
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    (Original post by zeropoint)
    A radiographer is a standalone qualification, usually taken as an undergraduate degree.

    My way of thinking about it is:
    A radiographer does the scan, a radiologist interprets the scan, the medical physicist makes sure the scan shows what it needs to.
    Makes sense, I hadn't quite considered it that way before.

    Thanks for the help, sorry for all the (sometimes silly) questions, I think I've asked all I need for now to find out all I need to know via google, and I may well be on here as an applicant in a couple of years when I'm in my final year at uni.
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    I'm seriously thinking about applying on the next cycle.
    I've looked at the MSc syllabus and the learning guides for placements and it all looks perfectly manageable and really interesting.
    Now I just need to make sure I have the right experience to get me onto the course!
    Does anyone have any suggestions about what kind of previous experience they are looking for? I'm already writing to local hospitals for ask for a visit, but are a few simple visits enough? How do you get a job in the field with no experience?!
    (Job hunting is a definite chicken and egg problem at the moment!)
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    (Original post by dsmtrst)
    My deputy head of department left university 18 years ago so that gives you an idea of how long to work up - this is nhs pay band 8c which is £55k - £67k (bit more in London).

    IPEM say the majority of nhs medical physicists reach pay band 8b which is £45k-£56k
    Okay, thank you, that's quite good I think
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    Has anyone else on a reserve list received an email to indicate that the list is being held open until the end of August? Following the original 3rd Aug date I gave up hope, but now it seems they are making some of us wait a little longer just in case! I would also be interested to know how late some of the 'reserves' from last years intake received a call, as surely there must be some sort of cut-off date.
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    (Original post by Lincolner)
    Hi

    I'm thinking of going into clinical science as well, through the medical physics theme, I'm not sure about the salary and career path though.

    There's the STP training scheme first which is 2 (or 3?) years? How much money do you earn here?

    Then you do a couple of years in a kind of supervised work environment? Which is a bit higher paid?

    Then when you become a full medical physicist and go to work as a clinical scientist somewhere, how much can you earn then? I've read about becoming a consultant as well, which is obviously the top of the chain, how would you get to that point and how long would it take?

    Sorry for all the questions, I've only just started looking at it and it looks interesting but I'm not sure if the salaries are quite high enough for me; I know they're good but I keep reading that there are very few medical physicists who earn any more than about £40k, and I'd quite like to have a bit more earning potential than that.
    GOOGLE!!!!! 'NHS pay' or 'medical physics training band NHS' you get very specific results. #1 and #2 are:

    http://www.prospects.ac.uk/medical_physicist_salary.htm
    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...cal-physicist/

    Pay is the same throughout training (i.e. the first 3 years).


    A question that may not be answered in a millisecond by google:
    (Original post by Lincolner)
    Then you do a couple of years in a kind of supervised work environment? Which is a bit higher paid?
    State registration (still being debated exactly how new scheme fits in), is after 4 years experience (3 years training does count). After which, you are 'qualified' i.e. not supervised. During your specialisation bit of the 3 year MSC you are effectively doing the job under supervision. i.e. you are trained, then you do under supervision.

    Using your initiative and finding stuff out yourself is part of the job requirements.
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    hiya guys,

    Im only 16 and soon to be going into sixth form. My preferable career would be being a doctor, although if i fail to get the grades, I am exploring the possibility of taking biomedicine, and taking that route into medicine, or using that to go up a slightly different career path, like this one.

    Firstly, am I right to believe that biomedicine is a suitable course? (I am most interested in the neuroscience or cardiac courses)
    How hard is it to get onto one of these courses?

    Thank you, and good luck to anyone that is applying for the next intake
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    (Original post by Jennynero)
    HI Guys,

    I've decided to accept the Micro position at The Royal Free.

    Is anyone else based here? It would be great to hear from people as I am relocating from West Yorkshire and don't know anyone

    I'm also confused by the masters online application. Did anyone else have to provide references again? and submit a personal statement? Surely we have already got a place on the course so why would we need to provide this all again. I have emailed but not heard back as of yet. I'm getting worried that it starts in a month and i've still not submitted yet as i'm waiting for references.

    This really is the most scary/stressful thing i've ever done. I wish we could be given more information and guidance about what is going on.:confused:
    Hi, I'm at the Royal Free doing micro! I'll send you a message
 
 
 
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