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    Hey, speaking from experience it is so hard to obtain a trainee post in an nhs lab at the moment! Especially with the centralisation of labs that is happening at the moment there are a lot of redundancies flying around for bms and privatisation of a lot of labs, I know in London TDL and GSTS are taking over a lot of NHS pathology services! That being said there are alot if MLA posts coming up, I would say if this is definitely a career you want, apply for an MLA post and work your way up. The NHS careers website is good for advertisements, other than that it's just a case of phoning labs directly or e-mailing lab managers and hoping for a bit of luck.
    I would try and look outside of London too maybe Essex/Hertfordshire area.


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    Hello everyone. I'm hoping to apply for the STP in Jan2013 when its opens for applications, hopefully to specialise in cardiac sciences. I've found lots of advice for the application form but the psycometric tests seem really daunting! Anyone got any advice on where I could practice some or what kind of things they would involve?? Thanks!
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    Hello
    A lot of people have mentioned trying to get some work experience in a hospital/visit an NHS lab before applying. How did you go about obtaining it? I'm looking to apply for medical physics so it would be good to visit a department at a hospital, but i can imagine that with all the safety regulations etc hospitals just wouldn't bother allowing people to visit..
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    (Original post by Shrub)
    Hello
    I'm looking to apply for medical physics so it would be good to visit a department at a hospital, but i can imagine that with all the safety regulations etc hospitals just wouldn't bother allowing people to visit..
    Not at all! Departments are normally very open to showing people around who are looking to apply. Being under 18 is the biggest hassle from a safety point of view.

    I'm a second year trainee and went to several hospitals to look around and talk to the staff before I applied.

    You'll find that departments will run open days just before the application cycle, so around this time of year. Just contact local medical physics departments and ask if they are running one this year.
    We're running a couple in Bristol.
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    Hi all,

    I'm a 1st year Medical Physics trainee, if anyone has any questions please feel free to message me / comment on here.
    I spoke to quite a few 1st years this time last year, and definitely helped my application / the whole process / interviews etc
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    (Original post by Nat89)
    Hi all,

    I'm a 1st year Medical Physics trainee, if anyone has any questions please feel free to message me / comment on here.
    I spoke to quite a few 1st years this time last year, and definitely helped my application / the whole process / interviews etc
    I've been receiving mixed messages with regards to application, do you have to graduate your undergraduate degree before you can apply?
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    Anyone applying for cardiac science in the next round of applications?


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    (Original post by Jack7Richards)
    I've been receiving mixed messages with regards to application, do you have to graduate your undergraduate degree before you can apply?
    No. You have to, eventually, obtain at least a 2:1, and you must finish before starting (although I'm not 100% on how long before). There were people last year who had offers but were rejected on their degree class.
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    Sorry for the slow reply, not been on here for a while...

    No, not at all. As long as you're predicted a 2.1 and will graduate before September you can apply to start this year

    *EDIT* ... oops probably should have checked the post above mine first ...

    (Original post by Jack7Richards)
    I've been receiving mixed messages with regards to application, do you have to graduate your undergraduate degree before you can apply?
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    Hi all, just thought I'd point out the NHS facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/NHSGraduateScheme?fref=ts

    They post lost of really helpful things about various stages in the application process. They also post events for open days at various hospitals in the different specialisms. I found Getting to an open day was great way to have things to talk about at the interview, especially since finding placements / having the chance to shadow in the NHS is quite difficult!

    Nat
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    Hi folks

    I'm currently employed as an MLA in the NHS and I was hoping to apply for the 2013 NHS scientist training programme. However, I have just read something very worrying on the FAQ page of their website regarding current NHS employees and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on the situation as I'm not sure I understand what they're saying:

    "Are current NHS employees eligible for the programme?

    Yes. We are keen to attract people already working in healthcare science and/or NHS employees on to the programme. In service candidates must meet the same quality assurance criteria applied to the appointment (or admission) of direct entry candidates (including interviews at the national interviews and on-line testing), but are not in competition for their substantive post."

    Also

    "How many training posts can candidates apply for?

    Applicants will have a maximum of two choices of specialism and up to three choices of location for each post. In service applicants will only be able to apply for a place on the training programme with their current employer."

    So, would I be considered an "in service" applicant since I currently work in the NHS as an MLA? If so, am I only allowed to apply for posts available in the hospital I'm currently working in (as it happens there are NO clinical biochemistry positions advertised for my hospital so I'm a bit stuffed if that's the case). Also, would I even need to go through the same application process? Quite worried that I've actually disadvantaged myself by taking on an MLA position - ironically, I only took this position as I thought it would boost my chances of getting in!!

    If anyone has any experience with this (e.g. those who applied last year) please let me know. Freaking out a bit here!!!

    Thanks
    Jenny
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    Hi,

    Me again. One other thing: I see that there are "clinical pharmaceutical science" posts available. Does anyone know what this is (can't find a job description anywhere) and whether I would be eligible to apply with a chemistry degree?

    Thanks
    Jenny
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    (Original post by jenny83)
    Hi folks

    I'm currently employed as an MLA in the NHS and I was hoping to apply for the 2013 NHS scientist training programme. However, I have just read something very worrying on the FAQ page of their website regarding current NHS employees and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on the situation as I'm not sure I understand what they're saying:

    "Are current NHS employees eligible for the programme?

    Yes. We are keen to attract people already working in healthcare science and/or NHS employees on to the programme. In service candidates must meet the same quality assurance criteria applied to the appointment (or admission) of direct entry candidates (including interviews at the national interviews and on-line testing), but are not in competition for their substantive post."

    Also

    "How many training posts can candidates apply for?

    Applicants will have a maximum of two choices of specialism and up to three choices of location for each post. In service applicants will only be able to apply for a place on the training programme with their current employer."

    So, would I be considered an "in service" applicant since I currently work in the NHS as an MLA? If so, am I only allowed to apply for posts available in the hospital I'm currently working in (as it happens there are NO clinical biochemistry positions advertised for my hospital so I'm a bit stuffed if that's the case). Also, would I even need to go through the same application process? Quite worried that I've actually disadvantaged myself by taking on an MLA position - ironically, I only took this position as I thought it would boost my chances of getting in!!

    If anyone has any experience with this (e.g. those who applied last year) please let me know. Freaking out a bit here!!!

    Thanks
    Jenny
    Yes, you are in service. It might be worth emailing them and asking what the rules are for location. I don't see why they can limit to where you can apply to just because you already have a job. I think common sense should prevail, especially if your site doesn't have a biochem offer.


    The answer to the first question about applying from within the NHS is basically saying you won't be at risk of losing your current job by applying for the programme.
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    Thanks for your reply Svenjamin. Good to know that I won't lose my job. Initially, I read the answer to the first Q re: NHS employee eligibility as "you won't be competing for the same positions as direct-entry candidates", in which case there would have to be a separate list of posts specifically for in-service applicants (and there isn't as far as I'm aware). So, what you said makes a lot more sense! Think I will call the NHS careers hotline on Monday to clarify the location thing. Don't understand why NHS employees should be treated differently to any other applicant. It's all a bit odd...:confused:

    Best wishes
    Jenny
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    Hi, I am applying for this years intake. Was wondering if there is anyone here who is doing the cardiac sciences route for the STP, who wouldn't mind telling what kind of experience they had when they applied and also what kind of things they were asked at the interview?
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    (Original post by jenny83)
    Hi folks

    So, would I be considered an "in service" applicant since I currently work in the NHS as an MLA? If so, am I only allowed to apply for posts available in the hospital I'm currently working in (as it happens there are NO clinical biochemistry positions advertised for my hospital so I'm a bit stuffed if that's the case). Also, would I even need to go through the same application process? Quite worried that I've actually disadvantaged myself by taking on an MLA position - ironically, I only took this position as I thought it would boost my chances of getting in!!

    If anyone has any experience with this (e.g. those who applied last year) please let me know. Freaking out a bit here!!!

    Thanks
    Jenny
    Unfortunately, you won't count as an inservice applicant unless your department offers an internal post and you apply for it. It doesn't refer to whether or not you currently work in the NHS. A substantial number of the 2012 intake (myself included) for blood, cellular and infection sciences were already working in the NHS as qualified biomedical scientists before applying.

    There is difference in the finances for inservice applicants (the department pays some of your salary instead of getting full funding) which means the department has a greater say over the trainees they take. i.e. they get funding for a staff member they already have to undergo the STP training. And there's less competition as you only have to beat anyone else in your department that applies. If you're the only one, you just have to prove your competence.

    All is not lost, you can still apply for other posts! Just as a direct entrant and not inservice. You haven't disadvantaged yourself, you've got paid laboratory experience, it's not something to knock.
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    Hi breakout

    Thanks for your reply, you've been very helpful (no longer confused - yay). The 'In Service' posts actually sound quite good if you can get them, so I might check out the internal job pages just in case.

    Best wishes for your training.
    Jenny
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    Hi all,

    I've been reading up on the STP for a while. I got a Bsc in Biology but no work experience in the nhs or anything health related. I've got no experience working in a lab either except some practicals I did as part of my uni course. I'm not sure if I should bother applying as this programme seems uncommonly competitive. What do you all think?
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    (Original post by Nat89)
    Hi all, just thought I'd point out the NHS facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/NHSGraduateScheme?fref=ts

    They post lost of really helpful things about various stages in the application process. They also post events for open days at various hospitals in the different specialisms. I found Getting to an open day was great way to have things to talk about at the interview, especially since finding placements / having the chance to shadow in the NHS is quite difficult!

    Nat
    Hey guys hows the application going.. and the tests.. anyone tried it yet?



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    Hey, I'm new to this thread. Just sent off my application and doing the practice tests - but I haven't psyched myself up to do the real tests yet!
 
 
 
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