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    Hi guys,

    I finished my second year of study in microbiology in may this year and will soon go on to do my honours year. I have been working in industry for the past 3 months studying antibiotic resistant E.coli in Heifers and newly born calves.
    Can anyone tell me when I can apply for the Clinical Scientist scheme, is it after graduating or a year prior to graduation?
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    (Original post by Labas)
    Hi guys,

    I finished my second year of study in microbiology in may this year and will soon go on to do my honours year. I have been working in industry for the past 3 months studying antibiotic resistant E.coli in Heifers and newly born calves.
    Can anyone tell me when I can apply for the Clinical Scientist scheme, is it after graduating or a year prior to graduation?
    You apply about 9-11 months before the job starts.

    So for example this year the schedule was:
    October 2009 - Feb 2010: Open for applications
    April 2010 - May 2010: Interviews
    September 2010: Job starts

    So if you want to start in September 2011, apply in the upcoming application season.

    And then there's a clearing for job vacancies in June to start in the September, but as that's clearing there usually isn't a lot of choice (I think this year only 2 fields had vacancies in clearing).
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    You apply about 9-11 months before the job starts.

    So for example this year the schedule was:
    October 2009 - Feb 2010: Open for applications
    April 2010 - May 2010: Interviews
    September 2010: Job starts

    So if you want to start in September 2011, apply in the upcoming application season.

    And then there's a clearing for job vacancies in June to start in the September, but as that's clearing there usually isn't a lot of choice (I think this year only 2 fields had vacancies in clearing).

    Thanks for the helpful advice Svenjamin.
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    Hello All, wanted to find out from previous successful applicants on to the trainee schemes if there are any specific requirements they believe made them successful. I have a 2:1 degree in Biomedical Science and a MSc in Biomedical science plus i have work experience in Microbiology, Chemistry and Haematology. this will be the first time i intend on applying, so just want to find out if my experience will make me stand out.
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    (Original post by GearHead)
    Hello All, wanted to find out from previous successful applicants on to the trainee schemes if there are any specific requirements they believe made them successful. I have a 2:1 degree in Biomedical Science and a MSc in Biomedical science plus i have work experience in Microbiology, Chemistry and Haematology. this will be the first time i intend on applying, so just want to find out if my experience will make me stand out.
    What they look for varies a lot between different fields, and even between different centres working in the same field.

    In my (not very worthy, so please don't take it as solid advice) opinion, I'd say it's most important to be enthusiastic and engaging when talking about the science. Experience is always great, but there are so many people out there with amazing experience that it's difficult to compete with that alone. Being able to talk about the subject with a passion will always stands out, and hopefully will help you come across as a nice guy to work with and train rather than someone who dryly regurgitates all the work they've done.

    And at the end when they ask if you want to ask a question, bring up something science related. Preferably something that raises a little discussion so the interviewer gets a bit more involved and gives a last chance to impress.

    But just as a disclaimer, all advice should be taken with a pinch of salt. Seems a bit pretentious for a new trainee to claim to have all the answers when it comes to interviews.
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    What will happen for next year - the recruitment website has gone down
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    Hopefully it'll be up nearer november time... they might be redesigning/updating it or something... hopefully.
    If its not up nearer november we'll have to ask around.
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    if you take a look at the NHS careers website, under the clinical scientist stuff they've recently updated the info on how to apply to the scheme.....

    it says "***The process of applying for clinical scientist training commencing in 2011 is still being clarified and further information will be available later this year.*** "

    so i guess we've just got to wait and see what happens. keep checking the NHS website - as they may completely change the application procedure and not use the old website

    hopefully they won't take too long!
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    Thanks!
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    Hi - I've a 2.1 degree in Human Genetics and currently starting a M.Sc in Genetics of Human Disease at UCL next week - am very interested in applying to the training scheme as a molecular geneticist for next year - would I have a good chance? I spent a summer working in a lab during my undergrad, did 6 months in a lab for my final year project and will be spending quite a lot of time in the lab this year - all my research so far is to do with medical genetics. Think I stand a fair chance? I really would love a career as a molecular geneticist, but don't want to get my hopes up at all just in case......
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    What they look for varies a lot between different fields, and even between different centres working in the same field.

    In my (not very worthy, so please don't take it as solid advice) opinion, I'd say it's most important to be enthusiastic and engaging when talking about the science. Experience is always great, but there are so many people out there with amazing experience that it's difficult to compete with that alone. Being able to talk about the subject with a passion will always stands out, and hopefully will help you come across as a nice guy to work with and train rather than someone who dryly regurgitates all the work they've done.

    And at the end when they ask if you want to ask a question, bring up something science related. Preferably something that raises a little discussion so the interviewer gets a bit more involved and gives a last chance to impress.

    But just as a disclaimer, all advice should be taken with a pinch of salt. Seems a bit pretentious for a new trainee to claim to have all the answers when it comes to interviews.
    Thanks for the advice, any advice is good advice for me at the moment.
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    (Original post by GearHead)
    Thanks for the advice, any advice is good advice for me at the moment.
    What field are you thinking of getting into? Someone might be able to provide more specific advice.
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    Hiya everyone!

    I'm going to apply for the biochemistry trainee scheme for the 2011 entry.

    Has anyone been on any lab visits yet?
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    What field are you thinking of getting into? Someone might be able to provide more specific advice.
    I am interested in microbiology but i also have some interest in haematology, it will be either of the two.
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    Microbiology seems to be extremely competitive. Last year there were only 7 places in the whole of the uk, maybe 8 or 9 if you included Scotland. I think many if not all the shortlisted applicants last year had PhDs but what the centres look for in candidates can vary. With the masters you could have some edge over others but with job positions and funding etc the way it is at the minute its not easy to say what they could decide. The best thing to do is to visit the centres that are offering places so you can look around and really confirm its what you want to do, and for them to see your enthusiasm for the role, and apply and see how it goes.
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    Where can i find information on the different training centres, the nhs recruitment site has been down for a while now.
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    I think they change each year. When the recruitment process starts in November they show all the advertised places on that site but as it's down for the moment I think we just have to wait. Hopefully some time around the end of october/beginning of november it'll be there, if not before.
    I suppose in the meantime you could contact your local hospital pathology department and speak to the clinical scientists there (if there are any) to get a feel for their role and what they like/dislike. That way you have more knowledge of the role and can at least put that on your app form if something comes up and you can't get to a centre.
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    Oooh, news from the Southampton website about their Audiology MSc (for anyone interested in training as a Clinical Scientist in Audiology):

    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/audiolo...duate/msc.html

    Just waiting for the Clinical Scientist website to be updated now...come on NHS, we're all in suspense here! :rolleyes:
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    I'm really struggling to find ANY information whatsoever regarding this scheme. Why is the NHS so hopeless! For example, where do you study? How much is it? Where can you study? I can't find answers anywhere. I have noticed though that it is rather competitive.. should I not even bother looking into this until I've done a postgraduate degree?
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    (Original post by Disenchanted)
    I'm really struggling to find ANY information whatsoever regarding this scheme. Why is the NHS so hopeless! For example, where do you study? How much is it? Where can you study? I can't find answers anywhere. I have noticed though that it is rather competitive.. should I not even bother looking into this until I've done a postgraduate degree?
    It's probably so hopeless because there's the wind of change in the NHS at the mo. They're planning a new system and so I'm guessing they're trying to figure out what to do with this year's intake. Either that or there's some logistical/admin problem, usually seems to be...

    As for the questions:
    where do you study? Depends on the field. Some operate on a system where there are several training labs which take people in (and so you apply to specific labs), whereas others seem to have centralised training (and so you apply to a general area and then get placed somewhere within that area). Audiology seems a bit different to everything else though (most people in this thread seem to be audiologists, so they can explain that system better than I can).

    How much is it? They pay you. Most jobs are NHS band 6 in the training stage, which starts out at £25,472. You may have to fork out of your own pocket for a MSc, but you'll get paid whilst studying so it's not all that bad.

    Where can you study? The MScs are usually at a local uni, so there's not much choice in the matter. Sometimes there may be a choice between a few courses, but that doesn't seem very common.

    should I not even bother looking into this until I've done a postgraduate degree? It is competitive, there's no avoiding that, but it's still worth applying after your degree. Some centres are a bit picky and prefer to only interview people with PhDs and years of lab experience, but many give new graduates a chance. Depends a lot on the field and the individual labs. In the lab I work in there's about a 50/50 mix of staff who came in straight after their degree/who have a MSc or PhD.

    If you are coming straight out of uni it's best to have a back-up plan, such as a postgrad qualification. If you get the job, great. If you don't it means you can still advance yourself so you have a better chance next time. There are so few jobs in clinical science that it's best to see it as a long term aim rather than applying once and then losing all hope after that. Persistence definitely pays off.
 
 
 
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