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    Hi I thought I'd post this as I know there are a lot of people like me eagerly waiting for an update...

    New recruitment scheme for Healthcare Scientists

    The new scheme for recruitment into graduate entry level Healthcare Scientist training posts in England will start in January 2011 for the September 2011 intake of Scientist Training Programme (STP) trainees - part of the Modernising Scientific Careers programme. Healthcare Scientists in England and Wales work across a range of exciting and challenging specialisms to deliver science-based diagnoses and treatments in virtually all healthcare settings.

    NHS Trusts, working in partnership with Strategic Health Authorities and Higher Education Institutions, will offer approximately 200 training posts in Life Sciences, Physics & Engineering or Physiological Sciences to start in October 2011. Successful candidates will join a three-year, fixed term, integrated training programme of workplace-based learning and a Master’s degree in their chosen specialism. Trainees will be employed by a single NHS Trust where they will be required to undertake a range of rotations, working in different departments (and possibly different trusts), before specialisation in the last two years of training. After this period of training, successful trainees will be in a position to apply for NHS posts as Healthcare Scientists and to the appropriate professional register.

    The new scheme will help to ensure consistency across the country. There will be a single national timetable for recruitment, national guidelines for the conduct of selection interviews, and assessment centres to ensure all candidates are treated fairly and equally. Science graduates will apply for the training posts through the NHS Jobs website, with shortlisting and selection processes organised and conducted by local Trusts working in established scientific networks.

    New scientific networks will be supported through grants to run assessment centres. The new national healthcare scientist trainee recruitment scheme will be managed on behalf of all SHAs by South Central SHA. It replaces the previous scheme, co-ordinated by Northgate Arinso Ltd.

    Details of all training posts will be available on the NHS Jobs website www.jobs.nhs.uk
    Further details of the scheme and a list of all the posts will be found on NHS Careers website www.nhscareers.nhs.uk
    Details will be on both websites in mid-January 2011

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    (Original post by ywish7)
    Hi I thought I'd post this as I know there are a lot of people like me eagerly waiting for an update...

    New recruitment scheme for Healthcare Scientists

    The new scheme for recruitment into graduate entry level Healthcare Scientist training posts in England will start in January 2011 for the September 2011 intake of Scientist Training Programme (STP) trainees - part of the Modernising Scientific Careers programme. Healthcare Scientists in England and Wales work across a range of exciting and challenging specialisms to deliver science-based diagnoses and treatments in virtually all healthcare settings.

    NHS Trusts, working in partnership with Strategic Health Authorities and Higher Education Institutions, will offer approximately 200 training posts in Life Sciences, Physics & Engineering or Physiological Sciences to start in October 2011. Successful candidates will join a three-year, fixed term, integrated training programme of workplace-based learning and a Master’s degree in their chosen specialism. Trainees will be employed by a single NHS Trust where they will be required to undertake a range of rotations, working in different departments (and possibly different trusts), before specialisation in the last two years of training. After this period of training, successful trainees will be in a position to apply for NHS posts as Healthcare Scientists and to the appropriate professional register.

    The new scheme will help to ensure consistency across the country. There will be a single national timetable for recruitment, national guidelines for the conduct of selection interviews, and assessment centres to ensure all candidates are treated fairly and equally. Science graduates will apply for the training posts through the NHS Jobs website, with shortlisting and selection processes organised and conducted by local Trusts working in established scientific networks.

    New scientific networks will be supported through grants to run assessment centres. The new national healthcare scientist trainee recruitment scheme will be managed on behalf of all SHAs by South Central SHA. It replaces the previous scheme, co-ordinated by Northgate Arinso Ltd.

    Details of all training posts will be available on the NHS Jobs website www.jobs.nhs.uk
    Further details of the scheme and a list of all the posts will be found on NHS Careers website www.nhscareers.nhs.uk
    Details will be on both websites in mid-January 2011

    Hey ywish7, I've been researcing all over the place for vacancies and your post has cleared all the confusion up! Thank you!

    I have a few concerns over the limited number of places on the scheme and for the courses that are IPEM accredited seeing as I want to go into medical physics, I was just speculating the chances of not doing a msc that's accredited..much more choice!!

    So the question is this..

    Clinical Research (msc+phd academia) vs Industry Engineer/Scientist (eg, Ge Medical) vs Clinical Scientist in a hospital (training route)??

    Unless I've missed out another route, I think these are the 3 main options. Does anyone know a little about each and allow a comparison of the 3? Like, job satisfaction, salary, stability, difficulty of job, pressures...yeah. :confused:

    Thank you anyone who has any insight into this!!!
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    I have experience of research and clinical, but not of industry.

    Clinical scientist (medical physics) is probably the best career in terms of job security and relatively straightforward progression. Once you have secured a permanent post you're unlikely to lose your job, and there are usually occasional opportunities to move up the ladder without relocating. In medical physics in particular, few people (at the moment) have much of a problem getting a permanent position after their Part 1 training (soon to be the 3 year STP), although that could change if funding is cut. Clinical scientist also pays fairly well, £25k for training, £30k after 3-4 years, with possibility of rise to £38-67k within the next ten years. Pensions and benefits are very generous, although likely to become less so. Depending on where you work, there are some opportunities to be involved in development work, although the majority of your work is likely to be routine service support. Job pressure is relatively low in junior positions, obviously rising as you take on management roles and being heavily dependent on where you work, staffing levels, how ambitious your are etc. Many people manage to work just 9-5.

    Industry is probably the next best in terms of job security, although I would imagine it is fairly difficult to get an entry level position if you don't have any experience. Most industrial medical physics R&D is not based in the country as far as I am aware, but there are still quite a few opportunities (for example Ekektra have a big centre in Crawley) I don't have any direct experience, but people generally suggest that the private sector is a lot more focussed, with quite different working practices to the NHS. Salary is much more variable but I think starts around mid-£20k.

    Research is potentially the most interesting if you find development work stimulating. You will have the most latitude to focus on areas that interest you and generally a lot of freedom in terms of working hours etc. A lot of people working in research have what most people would consider to be a high quality lifestyle, although it can still potentially be hard work, with long hours at times and a lot of pressure to publish results. Job security and pay is poor in the early stages of your career, you will need to do a MSc (usually), phD and then a couple of postdocs - all on short term contracts. This makes buying a house and settling down more difficult. Your chances of getting your next contract depend heavily on how well you did in your last post, so progression is very performance-based and potentially stressful. At some point you will face the very big hurdle of trying to land a permanent academic post. You will probably need to be prepared to move around the country, or even abroad in order to further your career. A lot of people (I would guess the majority) who do phDs or postdocs don't make it to becoming a lecturer and end up in industry/NHS. PhD Grant is from about £14000 (tax free) up to about £20k (tax free), although the latter end are rare. Post-doc salaries start at about £28k. Starting lecturer salaries are I think in the region of £35k, with the possibility of getting up to ~£70k in the long term.
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    Im planning to apply for the NHS scientist recruitment at 2012 entry....

    however would entry be possible with just an BSc in biochemistry? Or will i have to look into postgrad study?

    And it work experience necessary? If the answer is yes, then I would really appreciate if I could get help/pointers on possible molecular geneticist laboratories that take work experience placements. =D
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    *subscribes*

    Do you need a 2.1? I have a 2.2 in Biomedical Science from non-IBMS accredited university.
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    (Original post by Mbob)
    I have experience of research and clinical, but not of industry.

    Clinical scientist (medical physics) is probably the best career in terms of job security and relatively straightforward progression. Once you have secured a permanent post you're unlikely to lose your job, and there are usually occasional opportunities to move up the ladder without relocating. In medical physics in particular, few people (at the moment) have much of a problem getting a permanent position after their Part 1 training (soon to be the 3 year STP), although that could change if funding is cut. Clinical scientist also pays fairly well, £25k for training, £30k after 3-4 years, with possibility of rise to £38-67k within the next ten years. Pensions and benefits are very generous, although likely to become less so. Depending on where you work, there are some opportunities to be involved in development work, although the majority of your work is likely to be routine service support. Job pressure is relatively low in junior positions, obviously rising as you take on management roles and being heavily dependent on where you work, staffing levels, how ambitious your are etc. Many people manage to work just 9-5.

    Industry is probably the next best in terms of job security, although I would imagine it is fairly difficult to get an entry level position if you don't have any experience. Most industrial medical physics R&D is not based in the country as far as I am aware, but there are still quite a few opportunities (for example Ekektra have a big centre in Crawley) I don't have any direct experience, but people generally suggest that the private sector is a lot more focussed, with quite different working practices to the NHS. Salary is much more variable but I think starts around mid-£20k.

    Research is potentially the most interesting if you find development work stimulating. You will have the most latitude to focus on areas that interest you and generally a lot of freedom in terms of working hours etc. A lot of people working in research have what most people would consider to be a high quality lifestyle, although it can still potentially be hard work, with long hours at times and a lot of pressure to publish results. Job security and pay is poor in the early stages of your career, you will need to do a MSc (usually), phD and then a couple of postdocs - all on short term contracts. This makes buying a house and settling down more difficult. Your chances of getting your next contract depend heavily on how well you did in your last post, so progression is very performance-based and potentially stressful. At some point you will face the very big hurdle of trying to land a permanent academic post. You will probably need to be prepared to move around the country, or even abroad in order to further your career. A lot of people (I would guess the majority) who do phDs or postdocs don't make it to becoming a lecturer and end up in industry/NHS. PhD Grant is from about £14000 (tax free) up to about £20k (tax free), although the latter end are rare. Post-doc salaries start at about £28k. Starting lecturer salaries are I think in the region of £35k, with the possibility of getting up to ~£70k in the long term.
    Thank you MBob for your insight, this is the exact kind of reply I was hoping for!!

    If most jobs in clinical medphys involve routine service support, wouldn't that be boring/health risky? Like tasting gamma ray cameras..

    What kinda services are they expecting you to do? junior position vs senior difference



    Also, I'm a little confused over your summary of research route...if the pay and stability of posts is so bad..then how do they have "high quality lifestyles"?

    thanks
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    (Original post by owpowpowp)
    Thank you MBob for your insight, this is the exact kind of reply I was hoping for!!

    If most jobs in clinical medphys involve routine service support, wouldn't that be boring/health risky? Like tasting gamma ray cameras..
    There's no particular health risk involved with medical physics, you may get a small radiation dose if working in Nuclear Medicine, but far below the levels you would normally worry about. Whether or not you think the work is boring or not is a matter of personal preference.

    What kinda services are they expecting you to do? junior position vs senior difference.
    Its very variable depending on sub-discipline and where you work. You probably will spend time doing repetitive work (quality assurance or testing of equipment) but there is also more developmental work, implementing new techniques or treatments. The best way to find out is to ask for some work experience at a medical physics department. Senior staff take more overall responsibility, supervising other people's work and taking a lead in projects. They may also manage other staff.

    Also, I'm a little confused over your summary of research route...if the pay and stability of posts is so bad..then how do they have "high quality lifestyles"?
    Again it all depends on what you are looking for in a job. In research you often get a lot of freedom in how you plan your day, what hours you work, what research you do etc. There's lots of chances to attend seminars, conferences, network etc. If you want to spend a week just doing some reading then you might be able to do that, which you probably wouldn't in any other job. Obviously I'm generalising and it will depend on the lab you work at and what you are doing.
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    Hi! anyone knows if european citizens other than UK can apply for the training programs? I am spanish and got a degree and PhD from spanish universities, do I have any chances?
    Thanks to anyone who can help!!
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    Hi, I'm thinking of applying for the clinical mol genetics training post for 2011 with a 2:2 in Genetics Bsc and a Msc in molecular medicine. Does anyone know if I still have a chance of getting into the scheme with an Msc?? or do they still go by your first degree which has to be at least a 2.1??
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    (Original post by ywish7)
    Hi I thought I'd post this as I know there are a lot of people like me eagerly waiting for an update...

    New recruitment scheme for Healthcare Scientists

    The new scheme for recruitment into graduate entry level Healthcare Scientist training posts in England will start in January 2011 for the September 2011 intake of Scientist Training Programme (STP) trainees - part of the Modernising Scientific Careers programme. Healthcare Scientists in England and Wales work across a range of exciting and challenging specialisms to deliver science-based diagnoses and treatments in virtually all healthcare settings.

    NHS Trusts, working in partnership with Strategic Health Authorities and Higher Education Institutions, will offer approximately 200 training posts in Life Sciences, Physics & Engineering or Physiological Sciences to start in October 2011. Successful candidates will join a three-year, fixed term, integrated training programme of workplace-based learning and a Master’s degree in their chosen specialism. Trainees will be employed by a single NHS Trust where they will be required to undertake a range of rotations, working in different departments (and possibly different trusts), before specialisation in the last two years of training. After this period of training, successful trainees will be in a position to apply for NHS posts as Healthcare Scientists and to the appropriate professional register.

    The new scheme will help to ensure consistency across the country. There will be a single national timetable for recruitment, national guidelines for the conduct of selection interviews, and assessment centres to ensure all candidates are treated fairly and equally. Science graduates will apply for the training posts through the NHS Jobs website, with shortlisting and selection processes organised and conducted by local Trusts working in established scientific networks.

    New scientific networks will be supported through grants to run assessment centres. The new national healthcare scientist trainee recruitment scheme will be managed on behalf of all SHAs by South Central SHA. It replaces the previous scheme, co-ordinated by Northgate Arinso Ltd.

    Details of all training posts will be available on the NHS Jobs website www.jobs.nhs.uk
    Further details of the scheme and a list of all the posts will be found on NHS Careers website www.nhscareers.nhs.uk
    Details will be on both websites in mid-January 2011

    Sorry to rudely interrupt and sound stupid but I can't find anything on the NHS Jobs site about trainee healthcare scientists. Have you guys found anything?
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    i cannot find anything on nhs jobs either-it does state posts will be up mid january?
    what are you applying for?
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    (Original post by bubbles55)
    i cannot find anything on nhs jobs either-it does state posts will be up mid january?
    what are you applying for?
    At the moment I am undecided but it will be from the following; Molecular Geneticist; Cytogeneticist; Embryology and Andrology; Clinical Biochemist; and Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. I know it's a lot and quite varied but I'm really not sure what to go for.
    I personally want to see the lab list so that I can actually visit them and then work out where I will be living for the next three years of my life.

    What about you?
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    Hello everyone,

    I am interested in applying for the audiology posts, graduated last year in audiology. Just wondered if there is any one applying in this area and if they have any useful information. Many thanks
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    (Original post by yossyrocks)
    Hello everyone,

    I am interested in applying for the audiology posts, graduated last year in audiology. Just wondered if there is any one applying in this area and if they have any useful information. Many thanks
    Hey,

    I'm hoping to apply for the audiology post too. Sadly I don't have any useful info - I just keep me eye on the NHS website in the hope that the info will be up on there soon!

    Good luck anyway
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    Has anyone actually seen the advert in new scientist? Apparently the scheme for this year was supposed to be advertised in the New Sci mag.
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    I'm hoping to apply for Biochemistry/Immunology/Haematology in Bath or Bristol. I assume that the nhs website saying places will be advertised in mid-January means they should be available in the next couple of weeks, hopefully.
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    (Original post by Panthea)
    Hey,

    I'm hoping to apply for the audiology post too. Sadly I don't have any useful info - I just keep me eye on the NHS website in the hope that the info will be up on there soon!

    Good luck anyway

    Thanks Panthea, been doing the same as well. Do you know where you are hoping to apply to ?
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    (Original post by JC16)
    I'm hoping to apply for Biochemistry/Immunology/Haematology in Bath or Bristol. I assume that the nhs website saying places will be advertised in mid-January means they should be available in the next couple of weeks, hopefully.
    http://www.jobs.nhs.uk/cgi-bin/advse...ext_type=title

    That's all they've got up. And I am hoping that they get it in the next couple of weeks too. I shall try and keep you guys updated as currently, I am checking it practically every day.
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    (Original post by yossyrocks)
    Thanks Panthea, been doing the same as well. Do you know where you are hoping to apply to ?
    Hello again!

    Well, I've applied to Southampton for the MSc, and have been lucky enough to be offered a place, yay! As far as the STP post goes, I'm hoping that there will be places in Reading ideally; failing that, Windsor, Basingstoke or Guildford. I'm limited with where I can realistically go, as I own a house in Surrey with my partner so am rather tied to the area.

    How about you? Where will you apply to?
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    (Original post by Panthea)
    Hello again!

    Well, I've applied to Southampton for the MSc, and have been lucky enough to be offered a place, yay! As far as the STP post goes, I'm hoping that there will be places in Reading ideally; failing that, Windsor, Basingstoke or Guildford. I'm limited with where I can realistically go, as I own a house in Surrey with my partner so am rather tied to the area.

    How about you? Where will you apply to?
    Fingers crossed you will get it in the areas that you want. I am not really fussed as to where I get per se , but somewhere in the south west/ east and london area would not be too bad. Should you have applied for masters already ? I thought you needed to have the STP place first then apply for the masters ???:confused: hmmm...
 
 
 
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