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how to tell if you have a cavity

My teeth hurt sometimes ( quite a sharp pain) but I can’t tell whether a pit has been formed or whether it’s just the shape of my tooth.

I went to the dentist not long ago and nothing was said so maybe not?

does anyone know how to tell the difference
Original post by mon166
My teeth hurt sometimes ( quite a sharp pain) but I can’t tell whether a pit has been formed or whether it’s just the shape of my tooth.

I went to the dentist not long ago and nothing was said so maybe not?

does anyone know how to tell the difference

funny i am in the exact same position. Have this pain when i eat
Reply 2
Go to dentist :colondollar:
As the user above has said^^^^^
exams soon can't do that still
Pain is one symptom of having a cavity, but it is also symptomatic of other problems, such as an abscess or gum disease.

You can look out for other signs such as: visible holes/pits in your teeth, brown/black/white staining on tooth surfaces, tooth sensitivity.

But really you need to visit your dentist. If you can't, or in the mean time, please brush and floss your teeth twice a day. Use a fluoride toothpaste with a soft-bristled brush, and do not neglect the hard to reach areas in your mouth, such as the back teeth (where tooth decay is most common). You can take over-the-counter pain relief medication for the discomfort.
Reply 6
Original post by GST1_m4n543
funny i am in the exact same position. Have this pain when i eat


twinningg
Reply 7
Original post by Meduse
Pain is one symptom of having a cavity, but it is also symptomatic of other problems, such as an abscess or gum disease.

You can look out for other signs such as: visible holes/pits in your teeth, brown/black/white staining on tooth surfaces, tooth sensitivity.

But really you need to visit your dentist. If you can't, or in the mean time, please brush and floss your teeth twice a day. Use a fluoride toothpaste with a soft-bristled brush, and do not neglect the hard to reach areas in your mouth, such as the back teeth (where tooth decay is most common). You can take over-the-counter pain relief medication for the discomfort.


is it possible to just have pain without having any cavity or gun disease?
Original post by mon166
is it possible to just have pain without having any cavity or gun disease?

Sometimes you can experience generalised sensitivity. Also teeth are like any other body part, they can bruise too. Trauma can lead to bruising, and often discolouration occurs and you experience short term pain.
Best thing to do is to get a Dentist to check!
Reply 9
Original post by Dentaldreams
Sometimes you can experience generalised sensitivity. Also teeth are like any other body part, they can bruise too. Trauma can lead to bruising, and often discolouration occurs and you experience short term pain.
Best thing to do is to get a Dentist to check!


thank you for the response!
Original post by mon166
is it possible to just have pain without having any cavity or gun disease?


Sinus infections can also cause tooth pain, if only both upper sides of your teeth are hurting, but it's a less common cause. Pain is generally indicative of an inflammatory response to some kind of decay/infection.
Reply 11
Original post by Meduse
Sinus infections can also cause tooth pain, if only both upper sides of your teeth are hurting, but it's a less common cause. Pain is generally indicative of an inflammatory response to some kind of decay/infection.


thank you for the help.
as I can’t necessarily go to the dentist at this moment. do u have any tips on how to know if the cracks in my teeth are actually from a cavity or just a natural dent
Original post by mon166
thank you for the help.
as I can’t necessarily go to the dentist at this moment. do u have any tips on how to know if the cracks in my teeth are actually from a cavity or just a natural dent

It's hard to tell, as contrary to popular belief, cavities are not just a black/brown colour. It can vary (white/grey/black/yellow).

I'm not sure it is worthwhile trying to guess. Just get yourself to the dentist when you can and keep up with your oral hygiene.

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