grade boundaries??

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zik04._
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#1
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#1
got paper 1 on the 6th, 2 on 15th, 3 on 20th

AQA grade boundaries from 2019 to 2020 are exactly the same on the site at 67 for an A* etc, i asked my teacher if 75 is enough for an A and she said no? I need a B at least, how many marks should i go for or does anyone have nay idea of the grade boundaries or should i go off the 2019 boundaries.
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DataVenia
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Grade boundaries are very difficult to predict this year, because of the approach they're appear to be taking to unwind the impact of the Covid years.

What they've suggested they'll do it look at the proportion of students attaining each grade in 2019, and the proportion receiving each teacher-assessed grade in 2021 (which had been subject to grade inflation) and split the difference. In other words, they'll set the grade boundaries at whatever level means than the proportion getting each grade this year is half way between the 2019 and 2021 proportions.

So if each paper was just as easy/hard as the 2019 papers, and if the cohort taking the exams this year perform as well as the 2019 cohort did, then we'd expect the grade boundaries to be a little lower than the 2019 boundaries.

Unfortunately, both of those "ifs" are unknowable.

If you work from the 2019 boundaries, you're unlikely to be far wrong.
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zik04._
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#3
(Original post by DataVenia)
Grade boundaries are very difficult to predict this year, because of the approach they're appear to be taking to unwind the impact of the Covid years.

What they've suggested they'll do it look at the proportion of students attaining each grade in 2019, and the proportion receiving each teacher-assessed grade in 2021 (which had been subject to grade inflation) and split the difference. In other words, they'll set the grade boundaries at whatever level means than the proportion getting each grade this year is half way between the 2019 and 2021 proportions.

So if each paper was just as easy/hard as the 2019 papers, and if the cohort taking the exams this year perform as well as the 2019 cohort did, then we'd expect the grade boundaries to be a little lower than the 2019 boundaries.

Unfortunately, both of those "ifs" are unknowable.

If you work from the 2019 boundaries, you're unlikely to be far wrong.
sorry but the last sentence, im unlikely to be far wrong? As in its likely the 2019 grades are very off? Or its likely it will be around that range? 2020 says 52 for an A where as 2019 says 58. 2020 is likely to be low becuase of covid right? sorry if it too much lol im just lost, my teacher saying an A is around 80/100 marks just sounds nuts to me considering 2019 and 2020 is 52 - 58.
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DataVenia
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I can't see any evidence to support the statement your teacher has apparently made.

Given what we know about the 2019 boundaries, and the way they've said they'll work them out this year, my advice would be to assume that the boundaries this year will be around the level of the 2019 boundaries. They might actually be a little lower, but they might not.

Clearly the best approach is not to aim for a particular boundary mark anyway, but to aim for the highest mark you can. Perhaps that is the motive behind your teacher's statement?
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zik04._
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#5
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(Original post by DataVenia)
I can't see any evidence to support the statement your teacher has apparently made.

Given what we know about the 2019 boundaries, and the way they've said they'll work them out this year, my advice would be to assume that the boundaries this year will be around the level of the 2019 boundaries. They might actually be a little lower, but they might not.

Clearly the best approach is not to aim for a particular boundary mark anyway, but to aim for the highest mark you can. Perhaps that is the motive behind your teacher's statement?
i think you are right and thank you very much, one last thing lol. Have you done a level law in the past or are you a teacher or something, how do you know about how they said they will grade it and all that stuff. Is it on their site? If you dont mind can you link the grade boundaries that you are referring to from 2019, to confirm im lookin at the right thing
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DataVenia
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#6
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(Original post by zik04._)
...how do you know about how they said they will grade it and all that stuff. Is it on their site?
I know that's how they said they'd be doing the grade boundaries this year because I saw this news article back in February (when I was on the look-out for news about the "advance information") which said:

Pupils' GCSE and A-level exams will be graded more generously than in pre-pandemic years - to make up for the disruption Covid has had on learning.
...
They will be set at a "mid-point" between the 2019 pre-pandemic boundaries and the grade levels used in teacher assessments in 2021.
I then looked up the source of the information (as any good lawyer or historian should do!), from Ofqual, which is here. It says:

As we return to summer exams, in 2022 exam boards will set the grade boundaries based on a profile that reflects a midpoint between 2021 and pre-pandemic grading.
...
As in any other year, exam boards will use data as a starting point, to align their standards in a subject. That will be based on an average of 2019 and 2021 results for each subject.
...
Results overall will be higher than in 2019, and not as high as in 2020. The exact position may vary by subject and by grade.
...
Our transitional, midpoint approach in 2022 will create a grade distribution that is generous compared to 2019 but as fair as possible to students.
Now, whilst they don't spell-out in detail exactly what they're going to do, it seems reasonable to assume that they're going to look at the proportion of students at each grade to establish the "midpoint between 2021 and pre-pandemic grading", as I can't think of any other way they'd do it. Can you?
(Original post by zik04._)
If you dont mind can you link the grade boundaries that you are referring to from 2019, to confirm im lookin at the right thing
The grade boundaries I looked up are here.
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SiJ0NES
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#7
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AQA have nominal grade boundaries of 80/70/60% for the relevant grades. In reality, it depends how the cohort performs - which translates into grade boundaries being like 58% for an A and so on…
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