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Is it harder to get a better degree at oxbridge? Watch

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    (Original post by Nina)
    Edit: I certainly think its harder, but then again at one point I was working a 60 hour week just to fit everything in and still not getting through it all. You certainly cover a lot more than you do in other degrees, but in the same sort of depth, meaning there's much more to learn, which makes it harder. Its so subject dependent though.
    You're right, it is subject dependent. What you say is not true of my subject (English), at all.

    Oxbridge degrees involve a lot more donkey work - weekly unassessed essays, tute preparation, and so on. But none of that determines your degree class. I don't believe for one moment that it's harder to get a First at Oxford or Cambridge than at other universities - the getting of a First being based on exams and essays, and the marking of them. Marking standards, and essay / exam question standards, are pretty much equivalent at all the institutions I've studied at, and all those I know tutors and external examiners at (these include Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, York, Hull, Belfast, Glasgow, and Leeds). I know this is the case at least for English, History, and MFL.
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    (Original post by tomtom:))
    I do... Pretty hard degree!! :P
    What does it stand for?
    If you think there is any way in which a PhD can be compared to and valued against a Bachelor's degree, you obviously don't know what a PhD is. The article in the Times you think you saw does not exist. A PhD is the highest degree one can earn, and qualifies you to lecture at universities. A Bachelor's degree (BA / BSc) is the lowest degree one can earn, and if you have one and hope to lecture at a university you can expect at least another four to five years of study. There is no basis for comparison, and you shouldn't talk about things you don't understand.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    1. If you think there is any way in which a PhD can be compared to and valued against a Bachelor's degree, you obviously don't know what a PhD is. 2. The article in the Times you think you saw does not exist. A 3. PhD is the highest degree one can earn, and qualifies you to lecture at universities. A4. Bachelor's degree (BA / BSc) is the lowest degree one can earn, and if you have one and hope to lecture at a university you can expect at least another four to five years of study. There is no basis for comparison, and you shouldn't talk about things you don't understand.
    1.I didn't compare it!
    2.I never said anything about said article.
    3.Well yeah.
    4.Again obvious!
    The only thing i said in this thread about PhD's you've quoted me on. So if your post was directed at me you're an arrogant fool that can't read.
    I simply asked what PhD Is an abbreviation of.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Why do so many NatSci students get 2:1 or above then? Certainly my friend who is a former cambridge chemistry lecturer stated that this system of marking is not continued to the final assessment (or equivalent). It's the same as the economics system at cambridge. Even the QAA assessment (several years old and cambridge have increased their number of firsts and 2:1 since then like most other universities) said that the percentage of firsts and 2:1s is never less than 60% and this is very much an unusual lower limit. It seems odd that in for a scientific subject where greater than average performances are experienced in every other university in the UK Cambridge suddenly bucks that trend by giving 35% less firsts and 2:1s than the university average of 85.1%.
    You sure about that? According to the times:

    In the past decade only one of the top 30 universities – Cambridge – has reduced the proportion of firsts and 2:1s.
    I don't know about Natsci at Cambridge but in Maths, the borderlines are set to be (roughly) the same every year. This means that about 70% of people get firsts and 2.is (it fluctuates very slightly year-on-year and the actual method used to determine someone's class is staggeringly complicated- you can get more marks than someone else and end up with a lower class, for example). This applies in the final year, too. But this has the effect of meaning that Maths awards a larger number of firsts than other subjects but fewer 2.is. While classics, for example, awards nearly everyone a 2.i but hardly any firsts.
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    I do think I could have probably come out with a better degree class if I'd gone to a different uni, than the one I might end up getting from Oxford That's my opinion based on my own subject
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    I'd say internal examining, plus the fact that the pace at such an institution will be significantly more difficult to keep up with.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    Oxbridge degrees involve a lot more donkey work - weekly unassessed essays, tute preparation, and so on. But none of that determines your degree class.
    This is true, but I'd insert a "directly" before "determines". Whilst I think the people who deserve firsts tend to get them, I'd hazard it's in spite of the donkey work, which detracts from actually putting effort into the stuff that does effect grades. A lot of able students hand in rushed dissertations and still find themselves cramming for exams simply because they've not had the time to prepare properly. Likewise, having Finals which are heavily exam-based, which isn't the case at all unis, I think makes things rather more contingent than coursework assessment. Which isn't to say that marking criteria are much different, just that there is a greater chance of a good student ******* up their whole year's work by, eg., mistiming a single essay, which then ruins the two other essays on the paper.

    I'll add, though, that I don't know many cases of first class candidates ending up with a 2.i; it usually involves one eccentrically low mark (eg. a 2.ii in one paper, even if the student expected they'd get a first for it), rather than some sort of overall problem with marking being harder or whatever.
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    (Original post by tomtom:))
    1.I didn't compare it!
    2.I never said anything about said article.
    3.Well yeah.
    4.Again obvious!
    The only thing i said in this thread about PhD's you've quoted me on. So if your post was directed at me you're an arrogant fool that can't read.
    I simply asked what PhD Is an abbreviation of.
    Sorry yeah, I think it was someone called loafer I was aiming at. I was a bit tipsy last night, apologies! :o:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I do think I could have probably come out with a better degree class if I'd gone to a different uni, than the one I might end up getting from Oxford That's my opinion based on my own subject
    You will have a degree from Oxford though!
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    Sorry yeah, I think it was someone called loafer I was aiming at. I was a bit tipsy last night, apologies! :o:
    Apology accepted
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    (Original post by tomtom:))
    You will have a degree from Oxford though!
    Thing is I'd personally only be happy with a 2:1 (a First is out of the question for me). If I came out with a 2:2 or a Third, I wouldn't consider it worth all the stress, considering I could probably have got a 2:1 elsewhere with less stress
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Thing is I'd personally only be happy with a 2:1 (a First is out of the question for me). If I came out with a 2:2 or a Third, I wouldn't consider it worth all the stress, considering I could probably have got a 2:1 elsewhere with less stress
    Maybe so, so oxbridge isn't all that then!
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    (Original post by tomtom:))
    Maybe so, so oxbridge isn't all that then!
    Don't get me wrong, it's an amazing place and I love it, but I want to do a Masters and getting funding (which is hard enough for something like Music) requires at least a 2:1 :yep:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Don't get me wrong, it's an amazing place and I love it, but I want to do a Masters and getting funding (which is hard enough for something like Music) requires at least a 2:1 :yep:
    Good luck then!
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    Who just neg repped me!
    "I've just realised you negged me a while ago. Enjoy this purely retaliatory neg, (though you are talking rubbish in this thread)."
    Because i haven't neg repped anyone!!
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    It is common knowledge oxbridge Ba = manchester phd, Oxbridge masters (even ones designated after a few years) = manchester doctor of letters and so on

    I am happy to take PMs from people who need to know more info btw
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    (Original post by IrunNewYork)
    It is common knowledge oxbridge Ba = manchester phd, Oxbridge masters (even ones designated after a few years) = manchester doctor of letters and so on

    I am happy to take PMs from people who need to know more info btw
    What do you mean by that?:confused:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    What do you mean by that?:confused:
    When Bas and BScs are are upgraded to MAs (when you have accomplished great things, which nearly all their grads do)
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    What do you mean by that?:confused:
    4 years after graduation, all Oxford/Cambridge Bachelor's degrees are automatically upgraded to Master's degrees - it's a matter of status within the university, more than anything else.
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    For some more detail: http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/degrees/ma/
 
 
 
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