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German gcse writing help

Hi, so I have my German Writing GCSE tomorrow, and I’m just wondering in terms of writing about school and college. Do you need to say ‘abitur’ instead of A-level when talking about which a-levels I’m hoping to take. My German teacher corrected it to Abitur but a german person I know said just ‘a-levels’ would be better since they are equivalent not the same qualification. Also, if it came up in a translation would it be better to write Abitur still, or put A-level equivalent or just a- level?
Original post by Random11_206
Hi, so I have my German Writing GCSE tomorrow, and I’m just wondering in terms of writing about school and college. Do you need to say ‘abitur’ instead of A-level when talking about which a-levels I’m hoping to take. My German teacher corrected it to Abitur but a german person I know said just ‘a-levels’ would be better since they are equivalent not the same qualification. Also, if it came up in a translation would it be better to write Abitur still, or put A-level equivalent or just a- level?


Hi there.

@Il1L or @Kallisto may be able to help. :smile:

Good luck for your exam tomorrow! :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
hiya :smile: i feel like if your teacher corrected it to "abitur" you should probably go with that, even if a german person would say a-levels as that's probably what the examiners will look for and they could mark you down for just saying "a-levels" because its an english word?
Original post by Random11_206
Hi, so I have my German Writing GCSE tomorrow, and I’m just wondering in terms of writing about school and college. Do you need to say ‘abitur’ instead of A-level when talking about which a-levels I’m hoping to take. My German teacher corrected it to Abitur but a german person I know said just ‘a-levels’ would be better since they are equivalent not the same qualification. Also, if it came up in a translation would it be better to write Abitur still, or put A-level equivalent or just a- level?


Hi and thanks for the tag. You're right, the Abitur is the German version of A-levels or Baccaleaureate, but it is a different qualification so I would say A-levels. But I'm not a teacher so they probably know best for you and your exams... (I don't want to let you down)
Just remember a capital letter for nouns.
Good luck!
Original post by Random11_206
Hi, so I have my German Writing GCSE tomorrow, and I’m just wondering in terms of writing about school and college. Do you need to say ‘abitur’ instead of A-level when talking about which a-levels I’m hoping to take. My German teacher corrected it to Abitur but a german person I know said just ‘a-levels’ would be better since they are equivalent not the same qualification. Also, if it came up in a translation would it be better to write Abitur still, or put A-level equivalent or just a- level?


That is indeed a bit complicated to distinguish from, as the German and the English education systems are different. But let me explain that degree for you (I finished at that level as student): the German Abitur is the highest degree a German student can get at a German school. It is the degree German students need to go to Universities, it is an requirement they need in order to study. The lessons for the Abitur begin at 11th grade (called 'Oberstufe'), the students are at age 17 as a rule and can get this degree in the 12th or 13th grade, so at age 18 or 19. (according to the state the students are living). For some students 12 years at schools are required, for the other ones even 13.

The students who are striving for that degree have 8 subjects before the final exams, including three compulsory subjects, namely Maths, German and English (same goes for the other two degrees). Another obligations in terms of subjects are to choose at least one natural science (Biology, Chemistry or Physics), one social science (History or politics) and another required second foreign language (Latin, Spanish, French, Russian, etc.). When it comes to the final exams the students are mostly tested in five subjects, four written exams and one oral exam. two subjects are free to choice (called 'Wahlfächer') and the other three ones are compulsory (called 'Pflichtfächer'): Maths, German and English.

The scores for the degree Abitur are calculated by the tests, exams and final exams from the 11th grade to the final grade in total. The overall mark is shown in numbers: a student needs at least 300 points as score to achieve the worst overall mark, 4,0. And 900 points to get the best one, 1,0.

It was a pleasure to introduce my German education system and hope that you got the difference now. If you have still questions, let me know. I was educated in German schools!

Auf Wiedersehen! :biggrin:

@TriplexA thanks for your tag!
(edited 1 year ago)

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