The Student Room Group
Mappin Building
University of Sheffield
Sheffield

No prior knowledge of studying law in Uni

I applied for law at Sheffield and I'm wondering whether if you need certain knowledge before hand if you want to study in uni. I'm interested in law but I haven't studied it before and I don't really know anything about it? Is it completely normal for everyone to be in the same position? Will I be at a disadvantage if people studied law at a level? How are the modules like in Sheffield and is it hard?
bump
Mappin Building
University of Sheffield
Sheffield
How would I know if law is right for me because I've started reading letters by a law student and I don't understand some of the stuff that is in there? What sort of stuff will you learn about law in uni? I feel like I'm overthinking this.
Thanks for that. I checked Sheffield law modules and wanted to know if I can switch from Law LLB to Law and Criminology LLB? What's the difference between both courses and is one better than the other?
can i ask why law interests you when you know nothing about it?
Original post by Genesiss
can i ask why law interests you when you know nothing about it?


It was the only course that was available for me because I didn't have any interest in any other courses.
Original post by Anonymous
It was the only course that was available for me because I didn't have any interest in any other courses.


sorry you said in the op that you don't know anything about studying law, so this is why i asked what interests you about it? like, what interests you when you don't even know what it is you're studying? :confused: i want to study physics cuz i find it interesting. what's physics?

for clarity this is not me trying to talk you out of law or anything. i'm just asking the question because there are heaps of misconceptions about what it means to study law at uni and if you don't know anything about studying law my guess is your 'interest' stems from what you've seen on TV and movies - in reality tho it's not anything like that, not even close. lots of students think that tho and end up disappointed, hating it and complain it's dull. no, you aren't having legal debates. you aren't studying how to be a lawyer or what lawyers do; an LLB isn't a vocational degree.

have you ever read a judgment before? i would advise you to go to the Supreme Court website and open up a few because that's what you'll be reading for three years should you choose to study an LLB. reading judgments are painful. most of them incredibly long and borrringg.

do you love reading? i mean realllly love it, not just something you put up with; because law is notorious for reading - you will never keep up. i've witnessed more than one student break down and cry at school because they can't keep up with it. some of my friends read till the wee hours of the morning. of course your degree is what you make of it; really you don't have to read anything you don't want to. i also know a handful of people who don't read as much but they all ended up failing first year.

also know that law is notorious for handing out fewer first class marks than any other degree and you have to put in more effort into it than other degrees just to get a 2:1; why? see the point about reading above. in academic law the goal is to write arguments without any holes in them and cover all possible legal issues (in a problem question at least with the latter) which takes a lot of effort - that's why it's harder to achieve a first from a decent uni than say studying politics or history. do you have a good memory? cuz for a typical three hour exam you're going to need to know the names and principles of like 1.2 million cases.

you can find textbooks on Google scholar also and take a look inside them. i would suggest looking at equity, land law, contract law, constitutional law and jurisprudence to start.
There are no subject specific prerequisites to study law at uni and it does not presuppose any specific legal knowledge. The degree will assume general academic ability to read critically and make reasoned arguments about things though.
Reply 8
I studied law at uni without having studied it at A Level and it was no problem. They assume you have little or no prior knowledge and teach the concepts from scratch. The advantage with having A Level law is that the first year is probably a little less taxing in that you've already grasped the general concepts and have a good general understanding, but by the end of the first year, everybody will be at a similar knowledge level. I didn't find law particularly hard and got a 2:1 without perhaps putting my full effort into it. It's a great degree to have even if you decide not to become a solicitor or barrister. I'm a town planner and have found my law degree to be very helpful in many respects. Prior to town planning I was a Trading Standards Officer, and again, my background in law came in very useful.
Original post by Owl75
I studied law at uni without having studied it at A Level and it was no problem. They assume you have little or no prior knowledge and teach the concepts from scratch. The advantage with having A Level law is that the first year is probably a little less taxing in that you've already grasped the general concepts and have a good general understanding, but by the end of the first year, everybody will be at a similar knowledge level. I didn't find law particularly hard and got a 2:1 without perhaps putting my full effort into it. It's a great degree to have even if you decide not to become a solicitor or barrister. I'm a town planner and have found my law degree to be very helpful in many respects. Prior to town planning I was a Trading Standards Officer, and again, my background in law came in very useful.

Can I ask what do they teach you in the first few weeks and as it was your first time studying it, how did you feel at first? Was it quite hard to begin with or was it easy for you? Was everyone in the same position in the first lesson?
Reply 10
Original post by Anonymous
Can I ask what do they teach you in the first few weeks and as it was your first time studying it, how did you feel at first? Was it quite hard to begin with or was it easy for you? Was everyone in the same position in the first lesson?

The first few weeks are usually just the basics of law and an introduction to each of the modules in year one like contract law, criminal law, the justice system in general. I had absolutely no knowledge of law when I started but didn't find it a problem. Some bits are harder than others, but I found all the concepts fairly easy to grasp. There will be some A Level law students with a better basic understanding, but they assume you have no prior knowledge and start from scratch, so you'd catch up pretty quickly. There were lots of students who hadn't previously studied law, so it's definitely not unusual.
Original post by Anonymous
I applied for law at Sheffield and I'm wondering whether if you need certain knowledge before hand if you want to study in uni. I'm interested in law but I haven't studied it before and I don't really know anything about it? Is it completely normal for everyone to be in the same position? Will I be at a disadvantage if people studied law at a level? How are the modules like in Sheffield and is it hard?


I have just finished my first year of law at the University of Manchester. I did not do A Level law or have any legal knowledge whatsoever. you will be completely fine, during the first couple of weeks the terminology seems overwhelming but you pick it up quickly after that. don't stress!! xx

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending