The Student Room Group

What is a typical week time table like at University?

Hello all I'm not sure if I'm in the right place to ask this but it seems right.

I want to know what a normal week's time table would look like at university. I plan on studying computer science at Swansea. The reason I'm asking this is because I would rather travel to university rather than stay there. The reason for this is because I have pretty severe OCD and I don't think I would cope well living with other people, especially with the shared kitchen - I need everything to be pretty clean otherwise I have a pretty severe anxiety attack and leads me to compulsions.

I would like to study at Swansea, but the travel time is quite long and I want to try and make out how viable it would be traveling there. I don't know how many days a week I would be in University so forgive me if I sound stupid.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by LoyalBlue
Hello all I'm not sure if I'm in the right place to ask this but it seems right.

I want to know what a normal week's time table would look like at university. I plan on studying computer science at Swansea. The reason I'm asking this is because I would rather travel to university rather than stay there. The reason for this is because I have pretty severe OCD and I don't think I would cope well living with other people, especially with the shared kitchen - I need everything to be pretty clean otherwise I have a pretty severe anxiety attack and leads me to compulsions.

I would like to study at Swansea, but the travel time is quite long and I want to try and make out how viable it would be traveling there. I don't know how many days a week I would be in University so forgive me if I sound stupid.

Hi @LoyalBlue,

To be honest, it's very hard to give you an idea of what a 'typical' week looks like as this will vary from course to course and university to university.

As an English student, for example, I had fewer contact hours than my friends who took lab-based courses. So my 'typical' week at undergraduate level would probably have involved 6-10 hours of lectures and seminars split over 3-4 days, with the rest of my time spent in reading set texts and seminar preparation. For my friends studying Biology, however, they often had 3-4 full days of lab-based practical classes.

Timetables will also change each semester/year and will often depend on which optional modules you are taking. So you won't be able to guarantee that your classes - or the number of days that you will be required to be on campus - will be the same each semester or each year. That said, if you contact the Computer Science department at Swansea, they may be able to give you an idea of what a current undergraduate timetable looks like. Although the times and days of those classes might well change before you begin your course, this will allow you to see the average number of classes you'd be required to attend and roughly how many days you'd need to be on campus each week.

Whilst I appreciate your reasons for wanting to commute, I'd also recommend speaking with the accommodation team on campus about your accommodation needs, and seeing what your options are.

There's a lot more to campus life than your classes and, particularly at undergraduate level, there is a risk that you will miss out on some aspects of the university experience (especially on the social side) if you're not living locally. I currently commute an hour each way to my university and, as a mature postgraduate student who doesn't need to be on campus every day, that doesn't bother me. As a full-time undergraduate however, I think commuting would have been a real chore and would have hampered my ability to socialise, make friends, and settle in to campus life.

I have an anxiety condition myself so I can appreciate the anxieties around living with others but it's worth looking into your options. One of my friends at Keele, for example, moved into a studio apartment in a privately rented studio block near the campus. She's still in a building with other students but there are no shared facilities: she has her own kitchen, bedroom, and bathroom and only shares the block entranceway, which is cleaned by a professional cleaning firm.

Hope that helps!

Amy Louise :smile:
As above, it varies widely depending on uni and course. Generally STEM courses (like CS) have more contact hours than humanities or social sciences courses though, which would require you to be on campus more often and for longer periods of time.

Another thing to consider is that timetables are normally pretty random, and not really designed for commuters. You could well end up with a day where you have a one hour lecture at 9am, then nothing until a 1 hour tutorial at 5pm. Likewise you can end up with a single contact hour every day of the week, but most with just one or two, and only one day with many contact hours - you'd have to be travelling in for all of those days (or would be expected to, at least). Finally, your timetable often will change term to term, so one term you could be going in every day and one term you might just need to go in twice a week, which makes it hard to plan for long term season tickets economically.

This is part of why it's usually not advisable to commute long distances for uni - if your commute ends up over an hour in one direction, it can be very easy to get into a bad habit of feeling like "well I only have one contact hour at uni today and it'll take me twice as long to get there and back so I'll just not go in" and end up missing a lot of content as a result (also some timetabled activities have attendance taken and non-attendance can be a rationale for the uni to withdraw you from your programme). Obviously you can stay on campus and do your work for that time, but then you do need to be prepared to be travelling to campus for a full working day, effectively.

I'd definitely explore options that would either a) allow you to live nearer your uni b) study at a uni nearer to where you are now, or c) study by distance learning (i.e. via the Open Uni). Which would work best for you depends on your individual circumstances and future plans etc, of course.
Reply 3
Original post by Keele Postgraduate
I have an anxiety condition myself so I can appreciate the anxieties around living with others but it's worth looking into your options. One of my friends at Keele, for example, moved into a studio apartment in a privately rented studio block near the campus. She's still in a building with other students but there are no shared facilities: she has her own kitchen, bedroom, and bathroom and only shares the block entranceway, which is cleaned by a professional cleaning firm.

Hi @Keele Postgraduate

I would love to be in the position that your friend at Keele was in, but I'm assuming that costs a lot of money - and I just don't have that kind of money to do that. I would absolutely love that but it's sadly just not possible.

@artful_lounger Hi. Thanks for the above information, I'll take it into consideration.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by LoyalBlue
Hi @Keele Postgraduate

I would love to be in the position that your friend at Keele was in, but I'm assuming that costs a lot of money - and I just don't have that kind of money to do that. I would absolutely love that but it's sadly just not possible.

@artful_lounger Hi. Thanks for the above information, I'll take it into consideration.


Hi @LoyalBlue,

Yes, sadly living alone is not the cheapest of accommodation options, even around here (Keele is in one of the cheaper areas to live in the country). I would still strongly recommend contacting your university's accommodation office to see what's out there, however, and to discuss your individual circumstances and accommodation needs. You might be surprised at what they can do to help and, at the very least, it's worth an ask!

Hope you're able to find a solution that works for you.

Amy Louise :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending