The Student Room Group

What are your thoughts on several British cinema chains pulling The Lady of Heaven?

It sounds like a number of cinema chains in the UK have pulled screenings of The Lady of Heaven on blasphemy related grounds following quite extensive protests by a small percentage of the population:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10898561/Protests-erupt-outside-Vue-cinema-Stratford-Westfield-Muslims-angry-Lady-Heaven-movie.html

Personally I'm moderately concerned about this given that the UK is in practice a secular country with more than half of people having no religion, at least in practice even if lower on census data, and I believe strongly in freedom of expression and creativity. If these protestors do not agree with the content of the film, they can simply choose not to watch it while allowing others to do so. I believe the film depicts Muhammad's daughter in person and I know that the Islamic faith does not allow the depiction of figures, which is probably what the row is over.

I have absolutely no problem at all with Muslims, however do not agree with small hardline factions of the Islamic community trying to ban something for the rest of the population. The same would go with evangelical Christians (for instance Mary Whitehouse) trying to do the same with a film featuring a controversial depiction of Jesus.
Not only does the movie digitally portray the face of the prophet and family members (which is haram) it also insults the companions of the prophet in a negative way. Surely you can’t underestimate how disrespectful that is...
(edited 1 year ago)
Well I have no intention of watching this film, yet I suspect this will do nothing but help the producers get more views as polarized people throw out binary OTT rhetoric convinced of their own disposition under the remit of debate (with no intention of being open to alternative voices).

Overall the cinema chains are private organisations free to do what they want; although i do think free speech is a more important right then the right of a radical to be offended.

But ultimately they are private organisations , they are really just trying to avoid the reaction of a few offended radicals, and can do what they like.

Overall more people will watch the film, the Shapiro wannabees can scream and shout about this, and those who are offended by the film can also tell us how their religion is more important then freedom of speech. A win for the partisan, everyone who doesn't care inevitably will be forced to listen.
Original post by RJDG14
It sounds like a number of cinema chains in the UK have pulled screenings of The Lady of Heaven on blasphemy related grounds following quite extensive protests by a small percentage of the population:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10898561/Protests-erupt-outside-Vue-cinema-Stratford-Westfield-Muslims-angry-Lady-Heaven-movie.html

Personally I'm moderately concerned about this given that the UK is in practice a secular country with more than half of people having no religion, at least in practice even if lower on census data, and I believe strongly in freedom of expression and creativity. If these protestors do not agree with the content of the film, they can simply choose not to watch it while allowing others to do so. I believe the film depicts Muhammad's daughter in person and I know that the Islamic faith does not allow the depiction of figures, which is probably what the row is over.

I have absolutely no problem at all with Muslims, however do not agree with small hardline factions of the Islamic community trying to ban something for the rest of the population. The same would go with evangelical Christians (for instance Mary Whitehouse) trying to do the same with a film featuring a controversial depiction of Jesus.


Wasnt that long ago that the Life of Brian was banned in quite a few places in the uk
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Noble.x
Not only does the movie digitally portray the face of the prophet and family members (which is haram) it also insults the companions of the prophet in a negative way. Surely you can’t underestimate how disrespectful that as...


Still doesn't trump freedom of speech though does it. You don't like it, you don't watch it. A person's religion should tell that person how to act. It absolutely has no right to tell other how to act.
I'm appalled.
By both the conduct of the foul sectarians from within several religious sects & allied groups who have promoted the movie as a part of their horrifying agendas and the cowardly appeasement of some uk & usa cinemas who have practically given themselves whiplash alternating between pandering to them & backing away from them/the opposite faction of sectarians or religious fanatics than the average olympic gold winner can race.

Honour the commitment to screen the movie to consenting uk citizen adults who have booked their seats in advance, only preventing admission to those with serious criminal histories or an obvious unwillingness to comply with cinema rules.
Maintaining a similarly calm environment as generally occurred within mainstream modern society with controversial movies featuring religious figures or sensationalist/critical content with obvious associations involving events described within ancient religious scriptural traditions like The 10 Commandments (1965), The Omen trilogy (1976-81), The Passion of The Christ (2004) and Da Vinci Code.
Original post by Guru Jason
Still doesn't trump freedom of speech though does it. You don't like it, you don't watch it. A person's religion should tell that person how to act. It absolutely has no right to tell other how to act.


You have every right to watch it. They’ve spent months in production to make sure the history is “accurate” yet it’s not and shows false narrative of the early caliphs of islam. They’re portrayed as terrorists and others will assume those who follow them are similar. Surely you’re not going to watch the movie and ignore all the intentions they put forward, your views towards Muslims are more likely going to change especially those who have little to no knowledge about Islam.
Not sure why the onus of this is being placed on protesters engaging in their right to protest and free speech, and not private capitalist corporations making unilateral decisions in censoring the material as a result of those protests. The latter is the bigger issue here...ultimately it's the companies who are doing the censoring, not the protesters.
Original post by Noble.x
You have every right to watch it. They’ve spent months in production to make sure the history is “accurate” yet it’s not and shows false narrative of the early caliphs of islam. They’re portrayed as terrorists and others will assume those who follow them are similar. Surely you’re not going to watch the movie and ignore all the intentions they put forward, your views towards Muslims are more likely going to change especially those who have little to no knowledge about Islam.


Rubbish, no one has negative views of the British after watching Braveheart or Zulu even those who have no knowledge of history.

Islam's issue is the fact it depicts Islamic figures, not the actual context it shows. There would be uproar from the Islamic community even if it showed them in the most positive light.
Original post by artful_lounger
Not sure why the onus of this is being placed on protesters engaging in their right to protest and free speech, and not private capitalist corporations making unilateral decisions in censoring the material as a result of those protests. The latter is the bigger issue here...ultimately it's the companies who are doing the censoring, not the protesters.

Most likely fear of reprisal. Last thing the cinema wants is another Charlie hebdo.
Original post by Noble.x
Not only does the movie digitally portray the face of the prophet and family members (which is haram) it also insults the companions of the prophet in a negative way. Surely you can’t underestimate how disrespectful that is...


Myself and a close Muslim friend watched this on the DarkWeb today - which is of course where it will now be acceseed free
by many more millions of younger viewers than if it had just been run for a week at Cineworld. She said she did not find it disrespectful. I have to say I thought it very disappointing because its production values are so low: It's almost like a low-budget Bollywood ... the protesters have given it far too much oxygen and it's backfiring. However I absolutely respect what you say - I guess whether you're Sunni or Shia will affect your view of this "history'

Best wises, Evelyn.

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