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can i learn coding and get a career without A-level maths

I want to get a job in tech and start practicing how to code and eventually become a software developer or engineer. I wanted to know if you need to be good at maths? I only got a 6 in GCSE maths, can I still do it or is the maths content hard?
Some software development roles need strong maths skills, but not all do. In fact, I'm not even sure that most do.

Much more important is an extremely logical mind and a methodical approach to problem solving. Those skills also tend to be found in good mathematics, so there is a strong correlation between being good at maths and being good at coding.

However, it's perfectly possible to learn how to code in your spare time (i.e. to be self taught). What would be more difficult would be to persuade a potential employer that you have the skills they'd be looking for.

Difficult, but not impossible. One option would be to contribute towards open-source software to try to build a portfolio of work. Another would be to try to gain a role in an associated discipline (technical support, for example) and then make a sideways move into software development at the same company.

Remember that you're likely to be competing against Computer Science graduates, so expect that journey to contain a certain amount of disappointment.
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia
Some software development roles need strong maths skills, but not all do. In fact, I'm not even sure that most do.

Much more important is an extremely logical mind and a methodical approach to problem solving. Those skills also tend to be found in good mathematics, so there is a strong correlation between being good at maths and being good at coding.

However, it's perfectly possible to learn how to code in your spare time (i.e. to be self taught). What would be more difficult would be to persuade a potential employer that you have the skills they'd be looking for.

Difficult, but not impossible. One option would be to contribute towards open-source software to try to build a portfolio of work. Another would be to try to gain a role in an associated discipline (technical support, for example) and then make a sideways move into software development at the same company.

Remember that you're likely to be competing against Computer Science graduates, so expect that journey to contain a certain amount of disappointment.

Thank you for the reply! I have got an offer from Keele for computer science (software engineering). They dont require A level maths. But many people have said to me that if I'm not good at maths I will not get a good job. But i will try my best i'm not the brightest lol. If you do coding can you recommend me the best place to learn for complete beginners because i want to practice over the summer holidays, if thats okay.
In software, experience speaks much louder than most qualifications. You'll equally come to find there are many positions which do not necessarily require a degree, but instead an understanding of particular technologies and languages. This is something even graduates may struggle with, as they may still have very little to show for it.

A portfolio (beyond actual work experience) as mentioned is the best way to go about this. It'll allow employers to view any websites or applications (be it big or small) that you've developed - and allow them to get an understanding of the concepts and technologies you are familiar with (and to what extent). You should ideally aim to create a portfolio regardless of the path you chose to enter this industry.

As someone who works as a developer, I never took A-Level maths and have yet to encounter anything which has been mathematically intensive. It really depends on the application(s) you are building. An auto-pilot system naturally is going to require extremely complex mathematics in comparison to say an e-commerce back-end.

YouTube, in my opinion, is probably the singular best resource for learning anything programming related. The internet in general holds everything you need to actually teach yourself this stuff, it's simply a google search away.

"Python for beginners, C# for beginners, Java for beginners" will all yield good results on Google and on Youtube, and the same applies for whatever it you are learning.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Simz11111
But many people have said to me that if I'm not good at maths I will not get a good job.

Those people are talking nonsense. There are some development roles where strong maths knowledge is essential (working as a quant developer within an investment bank, for example) but most don't. In fact, I suspect most employers pay no attention whatsoever to the A levels a developer has.

Original post by Simz11111
If you do coding can you recommend me the best place to learn for complete beginners because i want to practice over the summer holidays, if thats okay.

Take a look at the course content (it'll be on their web site). There'll be some modules on basic concepts (data structures, design patterns, etc.) but you should see an indication of the specific language or languages they focus on. If there's more than one, pick one. Then, as has been suggested above, search for YouTube videos covering that language.

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