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Confusion on estimation of final degree classification

Hello there guys!

I am Mauricio and I am an university student taking a top up year from the UK.

I am creating this post because I am very confused about the estimation of my degree classification.

These are the following (Top-Up):

51 (30 credits)
71 (15 credits)
65 (15 credits)
63 (30 credits)
56 (15 credits)
52 (15 credits)

The weighting consists of 100%.

Can anyone help me, please? Thanks!
Do you know what rules your course and/or university to calculate the final degree classification? They normally appear within the Academic Regulations. They can vary, so it's important to check.

Assuming it's just a simple average (weighted by the number of credits in each module) - which seems reasonable but might be completely inaccurate - then you'd calculate it as follows:

51x30=1530
71x15=1065
65x15=975
63x30=1890
56x15=840
52x15=780

Sum those per-module totals to get 7080, and then divide it by the total credits (30+15+15+30+15+15=120) to get 59.

That's a 2:2. Some universities have special rules if you're just under the threshold (which you are here: 60% would have got you a 2:1). For example, I've seen rules that say if you're within 1% but at least half you per module scores are at the next level up, then they'll bump you up.

So do check the exact rules your university uses. Or let us know your university (and preferably course) so we can check.
Original post by DataVenia
Do you know what rules your course and/or university to calculate the final degree classification? They normally appear within the Academic Regulations. They can vary, so it's important to check.

Assuming it's just a simple average (weighted by the number of credits in each module) - which seems reasonable but might be completely inaccurate - then you'd calculate it as follows:

51x30=1530
71x15=1065
65x15=975
63x30=1890
56x15=840
52x15=780

Sum those per-module totals to get 7080, and then divide it by the total credits (30+15+15+30+15+15=120) to get 59.

That's a 2:2. Some universities have special rules if you're just under the threshold (which you are here: 60% would have got you a 2:1). For example, I've seen rules that say if you're within 1% but at least half you per module scores are at the next level up, then they'll bump you up.

So do check the exact rules your university uses. Or let us know your university (and preferably course) so we can check.

Thank you for your answer!

As far as I know, there is compensation of the lowest credit, which is 30 credits in this case.

The university is UWE, i hope it helps..
Original post by Anonymous
Thank you for your answer!

As far as I know, there is compensation of the lowest credit, which is 30 credits in this case.

The university is UWE, i hope it helps..

OK. Given that's it's UWE the easiest thing to do is probably to use the calculator they're created for you.

See the "Honours degrees: How to estimate your classification" section of their Degree Classifications page. I think you'll want the Direct Entrant Honours Degree Calculator (XLS) given that "you only studied 120 final year credits at UWE Bristol."

It says that it's the lowest 20 (not 30) credits which are handled differently, but allows you to split the 30-credit module you scored 51% in into a 20 credit sub-module and a 10 credit sub-module to get the maths to work. I've plugged in your numbers and it says you get 60% - a 2:1.
Original post by DataVenia
OK. Given that's it's UWE the easiest thing to do is probably to use the calculator they're created for you.

See the "Honours degrees: How to estimate your classification" section of their Degree Classifications page. I think you'll want the Direct Entrant Honours Degree Calculator (XLS) given that "you only studied 120 final year credits at UWE Bristol."

It says that it's the lowest 20 (not 30) credits which are handled differently, but allows you to split the 30-credit module you scored 51% in into a 20 credit sub-module and a 10 credit sub-module to get the maths to work. I've plugged in your numbers and it says you get 60% - a 2:1.


Thank you very much for your help. :smile:

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