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    Say you throw something 5m into the air and catch it 10 seconds later, does that mean it took 5 seconds to go up and 5 to come down? Is it alway an equal time going up and coming back down again?
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    wait yes

    yes it does
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    yup
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    Assuming gravity doesn't change in the interim, yes.
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    (Original post by Rocious)
    Yes.
    Thanks for the quick and simple answer! :yep:
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    Thanks all.
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    Yes, at least that's what I've been taught in Mechanics 1.
    Time taken to go up = time taken going down if both distances are equal.
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    I'l say no to make this interesting...
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    (Original post by ilikepiesandstuff)
    I'l say no to make this interesting...
    Haha I like your style.
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    No. I don't think so. Depends on a lot of factors like air resistance etc. For example, throwing a feather up in the air won't take long but it falling to the ground will.
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    No. I don't think so. Depends on a lot of factors like air resistance etc. For example, throwing a feather up in the air won't take long but it falling to the ground will.
    In the context of a Mechanics question though, "forget about air resistance." :p:
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    (Original post by Slash_GNR)
    Haha I like your style.
    Why thank you!

    You get my vote :P
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    No. I don't think so. Depends on a lot of factors like air resistance etc. For example, throwing a feather up in the air won't take long but it falling to the ground will.
    good luck throwing a feather in the air. if you can get it 1m above your head you deserve a prize
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    (Original post by bean87)
    good luck throwing a feather in the air. if you can get it 1m above your head you deserve a prize
    Gold plate it first.
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    What if you have an extremely strong throw, you could shoot it up quick then it'd taken longer to fall down?
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    Yes, if you exclude air resistance.

    I believe it takes longer to go up than going down in real life.
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    (Original post by ilikepiesandstuff)
    Why thank you!

    You get my vote :P
    Ahh crap now see what you've done, all these physicists talking about air resistance etc not that I was a physicist and was thus drawn to this in the first place :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by Reflexive)
    What if you have an extremely strong throw, you could shoot it up quick then it'd taken longer to fall down?
    That would only increase the max height, thus increasing the time to fall to match it.
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    What if it's so heavy that you cant throw it, and you happen to be 5m tall. It'll take 10seconds to fall to the ground? :P
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    (Original post by Reflexive)
    What if you have an extremely strong throw, you could shoot it up quick then it'd taken longer to fall down?
    yeah but it'd accelerate at the same rate as it would come down...right?
 
 
 
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