Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajj08)
    For me it is clear sciences and maths require more understanding and require more work than for humanities courses. Most people I know who do humanities/social sciences/ 'don't even go there subjects' have much more free time than I do studying physics. They also give you less useful information. For example, how is the information gained in history actually useful, although you may learn certain useful skills. Furthermore, I study Spanish in my spare time - I can't imagine and humanities students being able to learn any maths in their spare time ( and have never come across any humanities students delving into the the world of science). Sciences are also more profitable.

    Science students can normally manage to do humanities. Humanities students can't do sciences.
    I do History and Biology A-level :rolleyes:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dann)
    What uni do you study at ajj?
    What uni do you think?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by srana)
    ^ This, really. Sorry OP, mate, but if you want ridiculous, just consider the fact that this thread even exists. I prefer humanities to sciences, and personally think sciences are simpler to an extent, but I'd never make a thread about it and try and act as though all others should agree.
    Exactly, i think ajj may be wanting to backtrack and remove this thread if they could as it seems to have backfired...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Since you're doing English Lit why not try capital letters at the start of sentences?
    Since your human and I'm presuming a student - why not understand that both humanities and sciences are difficult but in different ways i.e. Maths which is considered a 'pure' science - you can simply learn the concept, formula and calculate. Whilst in a subject such as Politics, you can create your own arguments and explore topics with more ease. Some may find learning facts and processes difficult and others may find writing essays and answering questions where there is no clear answer difficult.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajj08)
    What uni do you think?
    I haven't the foggiest, hence the question.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChloeGsy)
    I am not ridiculous. That in itself is a ridiculous thing to say. I have an opinion, yours is opposed to mine. If you did a humanities subject then you'd understand the basics of a discussion and not retort with immature statements like the above and respect someone else's opinion.
    As a fellow humanities studier I am sorry to have to point out that a lot of discussion takes place in science and maths. In fact a lot of science is the basis of a lot of discussion spreading into things like philosophy
    People who are good at maths actually tend to be good at being rational and constructing a clear argument
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajj08)
    What uni do you think?
    not a very good one if they took you with your vocabulary skills, or lack of, which leave something to desire...
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    As someone who, when I studied both humanities and sciences, got the same sort of grades in both, I have to admit I found humanities more intellectually demanding. Maths, for example, you learn a formula, regurgitate it and put the right numbers at the start...voilá, full marks for that question! Humanities, otoh, require opinions and justification. Yes, you can probably blag your way through an English essay easier than a maths ones. Yet, if you give it your all - for me - English, History, Archaeology, etc., has so much more potential than sciences.

    Plus, the amount of revision I needed to for maths (after a year of only doing humanities as well!) compared to what I'd done for other subjects at that level was pitiful. Doing that subject was such a nice break, as although it wasn't easy, it was a completely different way of thinking and so gave my brain a rest.

    A lot of which one is easier and harder depends on the individual... I'll tell you which one I used to spend the most time on to get the highest grade though: Art. Simply because the volume of work you needed to do was larger than others.

    I've rambled a bit, but basically... just because we don't have concrete evidence (i.e. things like workings out on pieces of paper) showing everything we've thought, doesn't mean we haven't put thought into our work. Just because we have less contact hours doesn't mean we spend less hours working - think about how much we have to read after all!
    The two types of studying are so different that parts of the other are always going to look easier... but I don't think you can, without that scientific methodology and evidence that you should be so fond of, make a statement like that. Different types of minds find different types of work easier... I find maths/sciences easier, yet not as interesting, as humanities, but who's to say that what I find is universal?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    who cares even if they are?

    (Original post by ChloeGsy)
    not a very good one if they took you with your vocabulary skills, or lack of, which leave something to desire...
    im sorry but: ahahahahaha
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajj08)
    For me it is clear sciences and maths require more understanding and require more work than for humanities courses. Most people I know who do humanities/social sciences/ 'don't even go there subjects' have much more free time than I do studying physics. They also give you less useful information. For example, how is the information gained in history actually useful, although you may learn certain useful skills. Furthermore, I study Spanish in my spare time - I can't imagine and humanities students being able to learn any maths in their spare time ( and have never come across any humanities students delving into the the world of science). Sciences are also more profitable.

    Science students can normally manage to do humanities. Humanities students can't do sciences.
    In all fairness, I didn't do maths because I couldn't do it. That doesn't mean I'm a thick waster. :mad:
    Plus, pure maths students can't write an essay to save their lives
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Personally, I find the sciences easier.
    But, that's my opinion.
    It doesn't mean humanities subjects ARE in fact easier.
    It's all a matter of perspective.
    People enjoy and are good at different things.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing English but I can regurgitate facts with long words too.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    hahaha, i love how now ajj has been "temporarily banned"
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajj08)
    For me it is clear sciences and maths require more understanding and require more work than for humanities courses.
    I agree that they require more understanding, but not necessarily that they require more work... I'm quite good at Maths, so I can usually do a maths homework in half an hour. But work for humanities subjects usually took ages because they were often essay-based. And you can't do a humanities exam without having put the work in. Even the most intelligent person in the world couldn't pas a spanish exam, if he hadn't learnt any spanish. But he'd probably be able to pass a maths exam.

    Most people I know who do humanities/social sciences/ 'don't even go there subjects' have much more free time than I do studying physics.
    They're probably supposed to be studying, because they have lots of facts to memorise for their exams. It's just that some people consider this study time as "free time". But with science students, (and particularly maths) studying is probably less independent, as we need to be taught concepts, which you can't just memorise out of a book and regurgitate.

    They also give you less useful information. For example, how is the information gained in history actually useful, although you may learn certain useful skills.
    I think a lot of the information you get in a language course is far more useful than in a pure maths course? Although I agree with you about History. Then again, some people study their subject out of interest rather than purpose...

    Furthermore, I study Spanish in my spare time - I can't imagine and humanities students being able to learn any maths in their spare time ( and have never come across any humanities students delving into the the world of science).
    I'll agree with you on that one - that's probably because Humanities are easier to study independently, as there's more to learn and less to understand. If there's stuff to understand, you generally need to be taught it from before. Especially if its the kind of thing you get in a science university course. But someone on a science course could probably teach themselves history, just by reading aout it from a book.

    Sciences are also more profitable.
    What do you mean by that? I think Economics is considered to be a humanity :p:

    Science students can normally manage to do humanities. Humanities students can't do sciences.
    There are some people who are immensely good at both sciences and humanities, and have chosen a humanity for their degree. I think Sciences and Humanities just require different skills. The skills needed for sciences are usually god-given, or built up through years of practice, or both. The skills needed for Humanities aren't as prominent as the effort needed. But putting in the effort is something that (theoretically) anyone can do.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChloeGsy)
    hahaha, i love how now ajj has been "temporarily banned"
    HAHA, win.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Vykeera)
    Maths, for example, you learn a formula, regurgitate it and put the right numbers at the start...voilá, full marks for that question!
    That's only really the case at GCSE level - after that, it's up to you to derive your own formula

    Plus, the amount of revision I needed to for maths (after a year of only doing humanities as well!) compared to what I'd done for other subjects at that level was pitiful.
    That's true, although some people think Maths isn't a subject you should have to revise too much for. It's supposed to be more about understanding things than knowing things. At university level, even if you have memorised the formulae, it's no use because you can't use them unless you've proved them. And inventing a proof comes from your own creativity.

    A lot of which one is easier and harder depends on the individual... I'll tell you which one I used to spend the most time on to get the highest grade though: Art. Simply because the volume of work you needed to do was larger than others.
    Exactly the reason I didn't choose Art

    I've rambled a bit, but basically... just because we don't have concrete evidence (i.e. things like workings out on pieces of paper) showing everything we've thought, doesn't mean we haven't put thought into our work. Just because we have less contact hours doesn't mean we spend less hours working - think about how much we have to read after all!
    The two types of studying are so different that parts of the other are always going to look easier... but I don't think you can, without that scientific methodology and evidence that you should be so fond of, make a statement like that. Different types of minds find different types of work easier... I find maths/sciences easier, yet not as interesting, as humanities, but who's to say that what I find is universal?
    Excellent point
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    They're probably supposed to be studying, because they have lots of facts to memorise for their exams. It's just that some people consider this study time as "free time". But with science students, (and particularly maths) studying is probably less independent, as we need to be taught concepts, which you can't just memorise out of a book and regurgitate.
    Particularly maths?
    I assume you're not familiar with university maths?
    Maths has, for me, the same amount of lectures as science students here, with none of the practical. Most of the time in my degree is supposed to be done outside of lectures I believe.

    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I think a lot of the information you get in a language course is far more useful than in a pure maths course? Although I agree with you about History. Then again, some people study their subject out of interest rather than purpose...
    I do maths out of interest, rather than purpose.
    However, the information in a pure maths course whilst maybe less useful in each specific case, sets the basis for what much of technology is based on.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kt.b)
    In all fairness, I didn't do maths because I couldn't do it. That doesn't mean I'm a thick waster. :mad:
    Plus, pure maths students can't write an essay to save their lives
    I think you'll find that some of us were very good at that too.
    I scored amongst the top few of my year when I did English, and I'm doing maths
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    A friend doing Philosophy (8 lecture hours a week) was laughing at another friend doing MathsPhysics because he had 25 hours of lectures a week.
    I'll add to this for fairness that the Philosophy guy has to supposedly read several books/pamphlets a week.

    But whatever.
    The only conclusion I can draw from that is that a person of average ability across all subjects & intersts would have an easier time passing a Philosophy degree than a MathsPhys degree at my uni.
    ie. Philosophy is easier.
    It would be silly to expand this conclusion to cover ALL the various Humanties & Sciences subjects(esp. as the boundary gets very blurred sometimes).
    But in general I agree. Sciences (Maths Physics etc.) average workload seems to be significantly greater than Humanties (Philosophy, History, Theatre studies etc.); they are harder.
    IMO!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chrrye)
    A friend doing Philosophy (8 lecture hours a week) was laughing at another friend doing MathsPhysics because he had 25 hours of lectures a week.
    I'll add to this for fairness that the Philosophy guy has to supposedly read several books/pamphlets a week.

    But whatever.
    The only conclusion I can draw from that is that a person of average ability across all subjects & intersts would have an easier time passing a Philosophy degree than a MathsPhys degree at my uni.
    ie. Philosophy is easier.
    It would be silly to expand this conclusion to cover ALL the various Humanties & Sciences subjects(esp. as the boundary gets very blurred sometimes).
    But in general I agree. Sciences (Maths Physics etc.) average workload seems to be significantly greater than Humanties (Philosophy, History, Theatre studies etc.); they are harder.
    IMO!
    and you've extrapolated all of this from one person's reaction to your friend's no. of contact hours?

    average no. of formal contact hours per week =/= "harder".
 
 
 
Poll
How are you feeling in the run-up to Results Day 2018?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.