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    (Original post by OhNO!)
    I'm quite surprised that you don't know how to work out which degrees are harder than others, since you've been making pretty profound assertions about which ones are harder and easier up until now.
    I have retreated somewhat from my earlier opinion altho I still think there is definantly a sig.difference in contact hours and that this would have to have some effect on the 'hardness' of a subject were someone to find a way to quantfy such a thing. (Unlikely, even for a scientist)
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    I think that it's a bit difficult to generalise. For example, I found Law and Psychology (traditionally considered humanities subjects) at A-Level hard work, because of the effort you have to put in learning stuff. Eng Lit and Physics, on the other hand, as they're both more skills-based, I found easier. No meaningful science/humanities pattern emerging from that then.
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    (Original post by Chrrye)
    I have retreated somewhat from my earlier opinion altho I still think there is definantly a sig.difference in contact hours and that this would have to have some effect on the 'hardness' of a subject were someone to find a way to quantfy such a thing. (Unlikely, even for a scientist)
    this just shows your lack of understanding of arts subjects, how they are taught, and the nature of the work. I have six formal contact hours a week at university, but work is set to average an additional 48 hours a week of independent study, and informal contact with tutors and professors.

    there is a significant difference in formal contact hours, but this doesn't mean less work is being done. science subjects by their nature require more time in university, you have to do practicals, lab work etc., this doesn't make them harder.
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    i think humanities and sciences are too different to compare,
    i mean i do a proper mix of them as i'd say and sometimes it takes me longer to do chem homework than a history essay and vice versa,
    furthermore i think that ppl in this forum are generalising too much with saying that u jus memorise stuff in humanities and memorise formulae in maths, e.g. in english u have to interpret book which probably requires just as much thinking as doing a mole problem or solving a maths problem
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    (Original post by OhNO!)
    why are you trying to make yourself feel better about your subject choice? sciences aren't 'better' than humanities, and humanities aren't 'better' than the sciences.

    what a pointless attempt at an ego-boost.
    enjoy your worthless degree.
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    (Original post by Samtooth)
    enjoy your worthless degree.
    I am, thanks. enjoy your smug feeling of faux-superiority.
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    (Original post by OhNO!)
    I am, thanks. enjoy your smug feeling of faux-superiority.
    I will, thanks. My starting wage and I disagree with the faux nature.
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    (Original post by ChloeGsy)
    I couldn't disagree more.
    Humanities subjects require you to think for yourself, use your own intellect, reason and understand things in far more depth than the sciences or maths. In the latter subjects, you're simply taught to regurgitate information on tap with no input yourself. There is no room for questioning, no room for any sort of personal response to questions and for me, that means that you are not involved in what you're studying. How can just being taught something be enjoyable and rewarding? Yes, rewarding in the sense that you either know it or you don't so when it comes round to exam time, these subjects could be considered more straightforward as there is only one answer.
    There will be a million people on one side of this debate and a million on the other - both have their own pros and cons but there is no way that one can be considered easier than the other. They are two completely different disciplines - one where you're just a puppet on a string, churning out what somebody else has already worked out for you, and the other where you are you with your own chance to think about things. Humanities subjects require a lot more thought, concentration and involvement - you have to truly understand something to answer a question on it, not like in maths where you just follow a formula - no room to move.
    I know, i do humanities and maths.
    You do A level maths. Your comments are fair for the way the A level is done, but not for maths at a higher level.
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    Humanities students have less 'class' time. However, we are expected to do a lot of individual research and reading. I know humanities students that spend all day, 5 days a week in seminars/lectures/library. Humanities also requires a different kind of mindset, and humanities subjects are often very abstract. It is something that an advocate of the sciences probably wouldn't understand, but humanities subjects can be excpetionaly hard and mentally draining. They also provoke difficult, emotional responses from students in the way that the sciences don't.

    Unless you get on to doing original research, the sciences are largely a case of a) being good with numbers and b) remembering a lot of facts. That just won't wash with humanities, esp at degree level. A huge level of independent thinking is required from students.

    I know maths students who have recieved 1sts when they actually don't understand what they are working with and just regurgitate formulas and are good at mental arithmetic/working through prescribed methods. You could never, ever use that approach to do well in many of the humanities subjects. Understanding and challenging the norm are essential.

    Neither is harder between sciences or humanities. It isn't as simple as looking at how many lectures someone has. It is entirely a matter of mindset and application to the subject.
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    (Original post by Samtooth)
    My starting wage and I disagree with the faux nature.
    what a well constructed sentence.
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    (Original post by OhNO!)
    what a well constructed sentence.
    you're so cute.
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    (Original post by Schmokie Dragon)
    I know maths students who have recieved 1sts when they actually don't understand what they are working with and just regurgitate formulas and are good at mental arithmetic/working through prescribed methods. You could never, ever use that approach to do well in many of the humanities subjects. Understanding and challenging the norm are essential.
    What?! :eek: Which university is this?
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    Tell that to the 3rd year drama student I know with 68 hours of rehearsal a week, with devising and line-learning on top of that.

    I do english and art - yes, I have less contact time and lectures than my maths and biology pals, but the amount of self-directed study is a hell of a lot - I'm expected to do 18 hours of self-directed work a week for one of my art modules, spend 6 hours in life drawing, attend 4 lectures and two seminars, do 2 hours of prep for each seminar and read/study two texts a week (ranging from short plays/long poems to 600 page novels) *with* coursework and exams.

    Less work? Maybe I couldn't reel off complex physics business (since I haven't studied it, I wouldn't be surprised) but I doubt you could sit and draw a person for 6 hours without getting bored and produce a good likeness, or sift through critical essays to find suitable comments to back up and to refute your ecofeminist analysis of a novel.

    I don't think that physics is easy, far from it, but I think that just because my working hours are more flexible, doesn't mean it's less work! I love science, but I prefer being creative - go you sciencey people, and go my humanities people!
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    Speaking as someone who has just taken their first break from an odious essay on 'poetic voice' at 3.20 am after completing an equally insidious one about Marian imagery in Middle English Lyrics, humanities subjects are not easy. The workload is huge. If you are ill for any length of time it is at least as easy to find yourself drowning in essays as swamped with formulae, and you don't have the option of copying someone's homework... not that anyone on here would do such a thing ::
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    I always thought the sciences took more brain power but humanities took more time. Of course, if you are not naturally inclined at the sciences, you would complain about how much time you've spent doing work. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by yusufu)
    What?! :eek: Which university is this?
    More than one :p:

    And I am talking universities in the top 15 nation wide.
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    i) It depends on the level of study that you're looking at. Undergraduate level sciences do definitely not consist of regurgitating numbers and formulaes (I wish they did :p:); but I imagine undergraduate level humanities are very dissimilar from hazy recollections of GCSE history.
    ii) I couldn't do an essay based subject at undergraduate level. Haaarrrrdddddd.
    iii) From my experience of friends in humanities subjects, they're recommended to spend more time than I am outside of lectures doing work, but have less contact time. In total, we all generally have about 40 hours "working" time recommended a week. For me this is 1:1 contact:self; for some humanities students this proportion is closer to 2:3 or 1:2. I make no comment on the amount of time I spend working on my own time
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    (Original post by ChloeGsy)
    In the latter subjects, you're simply taught to regurgitate information on tap with no input yourself.
    Try going to uni with that attitude
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    (Original post by Hest)
    how else is technology supposed to progress if all scientists ever do is relearn old information?
    engineers :rolleyes: .
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    (Original post by Schmokie Dragon)
    More than one :p:

    And I am talking universities in the top 15 nation wide.
    I dunno, it seems unlikely to be true. University maths as I know it requires hardly any mental arithmetic, and depending on the topic, very very few to only some formulae. Who told you they don't know what they're doing? If they told you themselves I rather suspect they are fibbing.
 
 
 
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