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    What I mean is a normal degree on the same level as those degrees from distance learning universities like the Open University where you don't have to attend lectures and do everything at home by reading books and audio CD's? So many people would say that an employer would go for a candidate from a brick uni because they are actually taught and have to do presentations and group work whereas a distance degree would be mainly reading books. Others say that a distance learning degree would be valuble as it takes a lot of motivation to teach yourself, but really?
    Im doing a psychology degree with the OU and would like to do forensic psychology but would I have just as much chance as someone from a brick uni? Be honest.
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    Whether or not TSR people think a degree is more or less or equal from one university to another is not what is important, what is important is the effect this has on potential employers. You can only work with probabilties, and probabilities are high that a degree from the "top" 10 unis will give you an edge in most job interviews and allocating better paid/higher position jobs than those from unis that may not be considered as "high up".

    Before anyone here berates me, notice the use of "edge" and quotation marks.
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    I think getting a degree from OU is very good. I dont know if they do PGCE but if they did I think I would do that course with them if I waned to become a teacher which has sort of been my 'second career path'
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    No, lesser Universities only hand out eergeds instead so that their retarded students can understand.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Seriously though, of course a degree is a degree is a degree. No one's saying that all degrees have exactly the same merit, but the point is that all degrees have some merit, whether they're from Oxford or the Joe Bloggs' Institute of C**titude. You can't possibly lose anything from a degree and every single person gains something, even if it's only knowledge. Some people come out with this rubbish about how a degree in XYZ or from XYZ is useless, and a drain on society ('cause of student loans) but that's based on the pathetic notion that everyone who goes to University wants to work in the City or become Prime Minister, which is patently not true.

    So yes, a degree is a degree no matter where it's from. Any upper second-class or First, no matter at what institution, is something to put on your CV with PRIDE.
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    What's wrong with the OU? I'm at Cambridge, and I don't see myself doing any presentations or anything else you mention. Anyway, the OU's teaching standards are meant to be very good.
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    well it depends what it matters for.
    I suspect the teaching although different would to near enough the same level. (Not incluidng the unis that need ds and cs for entry of course)

    But to a potential employee then yes it does matter.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    What's wrong with the OU? I'm at Cambridge, and I don't see myself doing any presentations or anything else you mention. Anyway, the OU's teaching standards are meant to be very good.
    I don't know what you do at Cambridge but I would have bet that you did presentations and group work, guess not then. Ive never completed a degree at a normal uni (I left) so can't really compare myself but I thought that there was a variety of ways of learning rather than just reading books and listening to audio CD's (which is what I do).
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    technically; yes

    reality; no
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    No. Question answered. Issue closed.
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    (Original post by avalanche)
    I don't know what you do at Cambridge but I would have bet that you did presentations and group work, guess not then. Ive never completed a degree at a normal uni (I left) so can't really compare myself but I thought that there was a variety of ways of learning rather than just reading books and listening to audio CD's (which is what I do).
    Certainly not here. I do maths, which is hardly the best of subjects to give presentations on, but I know for a fact that none of my friends do presentations either - it's all just essays or problem sheets, lectures, reading and the occasional supervision (sort of a tutorial), in which (broadly speaking) science students will have their answers to problem sheets ripped to pieces and will consolidate their understanding of the lectures with their supervisors, and arts students will have their essays ripped to pieces and will discuss related topics with their supervisors. And supervisions are very specific to Cambridge (and Oxford, where they're called tutorials) - other universities have tutorials, but not in the same way.
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    A degree from the Open University is certainly well respected and would put you in good stead for a job.
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    Well, a relevant degree is better then no degree at all, and that's enough to give you a chance, which is all you need.
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    Well to be honest, there's a slight element of elitism in the top positions that people go for, such as those in the "big 4" (PWHC, Deloitte etc) and in the highly competitive graduate-training programmes. I'm not saying this is right, or how much weight it actually carries, but it does exist and we can't ignore it. At the end of the day a degree from Cambridge will carry more weight on a CV than one from, oh I don't know, Paisley (I only say this one because I originate from near there and much as it's improving greatly, it's not one of your ancients/red-brick unis)

    Personally, I think somewhere like the OU has a fantastic base for educating students, with the complete self-directed learning emphasis seperating the highly able from the less-able in terms of motivation and dedication to a subject.
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    If you want to go on to do a masters in forensic psychology, then it probably doesn't make too much difference that your degree is from the OU, although it may be harder to get relevant work experience if that is needed for the masters.

    At the end of the day though, that is the institution you are doing your degree with, and there is not a lot you can do about that, and you will to a certain extent, be judged by that institution, just as everybody else is.
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    No. You only really have a degree if you went to Oxbridge and got a 1st.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Certainly not here. I do maths, which is hardly the best of subjects to give presentations on, but I know for a fact that none of my friends do presentations either
    I'm pretty sure engineers do, and I remember talking to an art historian having a presentation crisis.
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    (Original post by Scipio90)
    I'm pretty sure engineers do, and I remember talking to an art historian having a presentation crisis.
    Cambridge does history of art?! And I've never heard of any engineers having them. Oh well.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Cambridge does history of art?!
    :yep:
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    OU is respected I think. It shows you are dedicated and motivated, as there is nothing forcing you to study. Having seen my Mum's OU course stuff though, I do have doubts about the worth of some of the modules they offer. I guess they are no worse than a lot of other universities in that respect though. I reckon an OU degree would be looked upon a lot more favourably than one from some of the less reputable universities to be honest.

    Here at Oxford, all we really get that you don't at OU is individual tutorials, and practical labs (for Physics, at least, although I think the OU do summer schools for that sort of thing). Some of our lectures are probably less use than those OU videos, too.
 
 
 
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