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Sports Science

Hi everyone, I am an international mature student and I have applied for sports science at Brunel university and also Sports therapy at the University of Kent.

Is anyone else doing either of these courses?

Also any opinion on which might be a better option considering I want to then pursue a masters degree?
Original post by Cosmic29
Hi everyone, I am an international mature student and I have applied for sports science at Brunel university and also Sports therapy at the University of Kent.

Is anyone else doing either of these courses?

Also any opinion on which might be a better option considering I want to then pursue a masters degree?



Hi Cosmic,

I’m a qualified sports therapist. I decided to retrain as a Physiotherapist due to lack of work options once qualified as an ST. Please remember this is just my opinion based on my experience. It’s not a positive one.

Sports therapist’s aren’t regulated by a governing body in the way Physiotherapists are. Please research into sports rehab/sports science/sports therapy to understand this.

My work is mainly at a sports club during their season doing a clinic 1-2 times a week and a game day pitchside on Saturdays. If it’s an away game, it could be a 10-12 hour day which you only get paid for 3 hours.

Other work has been working in a clinic offering sports massage and resistance band rehab. This is all ok if you live at home with parents but if you’re renting your own or paying mortgage then it’s a massive struggle.

My advice for anyone thinking about ST, SR or SS is to not do it. Harsh, I know, but there is absolutely no guarantee of regular money coming in.

Further advice is to train as a Physiotherapist BSc. They are regulated by a governing body (HCPC). There are so many more options for areas to work in and gain experience, promotion and earn more. Guaranteed monthly wage once qualified.

Further advice is at the end of the Physiotherapy 1st year, do a sports massage course. They condense them now into 3-5 day courses. This gives you a level 3 qualification. At the beginning of your 2nd year you could apply to a local sports club to offer your time to work in their clinics eg local amateur rugby club. This will be for one or two evenings a week usually eg 7pm-9pm

They’ll love having a student physio there. You’ll learn about MSK injuries by the bucketload and get experience shadowing pitchside. You’ll get to massage players and learn how to develop relationships with players which is really important for any type of therapist.

Nothing gives you the MSK knowledge around injuries like a impact sport like rugby. The injury/rehab knowledge is so valuable. There are also plenty of online learning resources to access so you can build your understanding of health conditions.

Physios Matters podcast and learning symposiums are outstanding. Also, ‘Clinical Edge’ podcasts.

Once you’ve qualified as a Physiotherapist you can apply for work with a local sports club to further your knowledge and gain some regular income but it’s only seasonal and a few hours a week.

While I totally understand you might not want to work in a hospital this is more about what you can do with the qualification. You can work abroad as a Physiotherapist. You can’t with the others albeit for maybe a couple of places as far as I know.

You don’t get the career opportunities to improve in position/finance and experience imo as an SS, ST or SR.

The amount of people I’ve heard who qualified as ST, SS or SR but then retrained as physios is ridiculous. All because of lack of employment opportunities. These ‘Sports’ are sold really well. The very tiny majority get to work in a club at a higher level.

If your heart is set on a Sports related degree then I wish you all the best and I hope it gives you everything you hope for. You can of course do an MSc after qualifying.
Reply 2
Thank you so much for your response it was really helpful.I do wish you all the best in the future!!!So originally I did apply for a physiotherapy undergraduate but I was not accepted because I had not completed my Alevels and I am doing a foundation year which many universities said did not meet the requirements for physiotherapyBrunel was one of the universities and they offered me Sports science instead and I also applied for sports therapy at Kent I was thinking of doing one of them as they are my only options at this time then doing a master's in physiotherapy as that was the original goal.From your experience, is there a certain one that would be more beneficial, in the sense would better prepare me for the masters course?
Original post by Cosmic29
Thank you so much for your response it was really helpful.I do wish you all the best in the future!!!So originally I did apply for a physiotherapy undergraduate but I was not accepted because I had not completed my Alevels and I am doing a foundation year which many universities said did not meet the requirements for physiotherapyBrunel was one of the universities and they offered me Sports science instead and I also applied for sports therapy at Kent I was thinking of doing one of them as they are my only options at this time then doing a master's in physiotherapy as that was the original goal.From your experience, is there a certain one that would be more beneficial, in the sense would better prepare me for the masters course?

Hi Cosmic,

Ahh, I wondered this but didn’t ask you that; it makes sense. Sorry about that.

I’d say sports therapy will be more focussed on sports rehab, injuries etc as opposed to sports science. As I haven’t done a sports science BSc I can’t comment on what their content is but the sports therapy BSc will cover a lot of MSK which will be essential for your MSc.

As long as you have a good/acceptable grade for MSc I’m sure they’ll accept you for it regardless of SS or ST.

If you haven’t already done so, do a search on here to see if other members have posted about the difference between SS & ST. It’s a common dilemma.

In my head I’d say sports therapy but again these are Q’s for you ask the tutors and other students via this forum. Also, as I previously mentioned, my experience with ST isn’t that positive plus I’d been qualified a couple of years before the pandemic hit. My 3 jobs all stopped as we were not supported as ST. All physios continued to work during covid. It was during this time I worked as a Physiotherapy assistant

Keep us posted mate. Wish you all the best
Reply 4
Original post by ACKI506
Hi Cosmic,

Ahh, I wondered this but didn’t ask you that; it makes sense. Sorry about that.

I’d say sports therapy will be more focussed on sports rehab, injuries etc as opposed to sports science. As I haven’t done a sports science BSc I can’t comment on what their content is but the sports therapy BSc will cover a lot of MSK which will be essential for your MSc.

As long as you have a good/acceptable grade for MSc I’m sure they’ll accept you for it regardless of SS or ST.

If you haven’t already done so, do a search on here to see if other members have posted about the difference between SS & ST. It’s a common dilemma.

In my head I’d say sports therapy but again these are Q’s for you ask the tutors and other students via this forum. Also, as I previously mentioned, my experience with ST isn’t that positive plus I’d been qualified a couple of years before the pandemic hit. My 3 jobs all stopped as we were not supported as ST. All physios continued to work during covid. It was during this time I worked as a Physiotherapy assistant

Keep us posted mate. Wish you all the best


Thank you so much, you've honestly been really helpful!!!

I will definitely let you know what I decide
Original post by Cosmic29
Thank you so much, you've honestly been really helpful!!!

I will definitely let you know what I decide


More than welcome, Cosmic 👊💥
Original post by ACKI506
Hi Cosmic,

I’m a qualified sports therapist. I decided to retrain as a Physiotherapist due to lack of work options once qualified as an ST. Please remember this is just my opinion based on my experience. It’s not a positive one.

Sports therapist’s aren’t regulated by a governing body in the way Physiotherapists are. Please research into sports rehab/sports science/sports therapy to understand this.

My work is mainly at a sports club during their season doing a clinic 1-2 times a week and a game day pitchside on Saturdays. If it’s an away game, it could be a 10-12 hour day which you only get paid for 3 hours.

Other work has been working in a clinic offering sports massage and resistance band rehab. This is all ok if you live at home with parents but if you’re renting your own or paying mortgage then it’s a massive struggle.

My advice for anyone thinking about ST, SR or SS is to not do it. Harsh, I know, but there is absolutely no guarantee of regular money coming in.

Further advice is to train as a Physiotherapist BSc. They are regulated by a governing body (HCPC). There are so many more options for areas to work in and gain experience, promotion and earn more. Guaranteed monthly wage once qualified.

Further advice is at the end of the Physiotherapy 1st year, do a sports massage course. They condense them now into 3-5 day courses. This gives you a level 3 qualification. At the beginning of your 2nd year you could apply to a local sports club to offer your time to work in their clinics eg local amateur rugby club. This will be for one or two evenings a week usually eg 7pm-9pm

They’ll love having a student physio there. You’ll learn about MSK injuries by the bucketload and get experience shadowing pitchside. You’ll get to massage players and learn how to develop relationships with players which is really important for any type of therapist.

Nothing gives you the MSK knowledge around injuries like a impact sport like rugby. The injury/rehab knowledge is so valuable. There are also plenty of online learning resources to access so you can build your understanding of health conditions.

Physios Matters podcast and learning symposiums are outstanding. Also, ‘Clinical Edge’ podcasts.

Once you’ve qualified as a Physiotherapist you can apply for work with a local sports club to further your knowledge and gain some regular income but it’s only seasonal and a few hours a week.

While I totally understand you might not want to work in a hospital this is more about what you can do with the qualification. You can work abroad as a Physiotherapist. You can’t with the others albeit for maybe a couple of places as far as I know.

You don’t get the career opportunities to improve in position/finance and experience imo as an SS, ST or SR.

The amount of people I’ve heard who qualified as ST, SS or SR but then retrained as physios is ridiculous. All because of lack of employment opportunities. These ‘Sports’ are sold really well. The very tiny majority get to work in a club at a higher level.

If your heart is set on a Sports related degree then I wish you all the best and I hope it gives you everything you hope for. You can of course do an MSc after qualifying.


This is a very honest account of Sports Rehab / Therapy. The Unis sell you the world, promising good job opportunities etc. Unless you are 100% dedicated to the lifestyle of working for free or little money, then this is not a good option. The amount of Physios I came across in clubs that did rehab first, then a second BSc or MSc in Physio was ridiculous. I completely agree that regulation is the biggest barrier to any progression for the rehab / therapy profession. HCPC registration is a must for countability and confidence to employ someone beyond basic massage.

Cosmic, id say don't rush and only do a sport undergrad if you are planning to do Physio MSc. But also consider the Physio MSc are hard to get on so be prepared just incase your unsuccessful in the immediate year following your BSc. Look into a 1 year access course at a college that will provide the UCAS points of A levels to then do BSc Physio.
Original post by anonymous789123
This is a very honest account of Sports Rehab / Therapy. The Unis sell you the world, promising good job opportunities etc. Unless you are 100% dedicated to the lifestyle of working for free or little money, then this is not a good option. The amount of Physios I came across in clubs that did rehab first, then a second BSc or MSc in Physio was ridiculous. I completely agree that regulation is the biggest barrier to any progression for the rehab / therapy profession. HCPC registration is a must for countability and confidence to employ someone beyond basic massage.

Cosmic, id say don't rush and only do a sport undergrad if you are planning to do Physio MSc. But also consider the Physio MSc are hard to get on so be prepared just incase your unsuccessful in the immediate year following your BSc. Look into a 1 year access course at a college that will provide the UCAS points of A levels to then do BSc Physio.

Yeah, agree totally. I believe they are pushing BASRAT now.

@Cosmic29 I didn’t think to suggest the access course which Anonymous 789123 has mentioned. I would totally agree with them on this and follow the application for Physiotherapy BSc after the access course has given you the necessary grades you need for the course/qualification you REALLY WANT. I feel you’d be bitterly disappointed going the Sports route.

One of my seated exams was to write down the 20 stages the STO (Sports Therapy Organisation) had gone through over a period of 20 years. Dating back to 2000 and their challenges with the Tory government and trying to help ST become recognised. This was an exam in my 3rd and final year?!?! Unbelievable.

Personally, I don’t care. A physio said to me ‘Well, it’s a good thing to understand your history!’ My reply was ‘Knowing this does not help me help an athlete through ACL reconstruction rehab. It does not help me assess an ACJ injury. It does not help me earn money!’

They also taught ultrasound. 3 months of mock exams (and stress) in my 2nd year for a modality (thermo treatment) that has zero evidence of benefits and a modality I never used.
Original post by Cosmic29
Hi everyone, I am an international mature student and I have applied for sports science at Brunel university and also Sports therapy at the University of Kent.

Is anyone else doing either of these courses?

Also any opinion on which might be a better option considering I want to then pursue a masters degree?


Hi!

Congratulations on sending off your applications! Unfortunately I do not study sports science nor sports therapy but I am very happy to share some information about what our the University of Kent has to offer.

Are you driven to make a difference in
Kent provides a Sport Therapy and Rehabilitation undergraduate course focusing on diagnosis, treatment and the prevention of injuries, allowing students to develop the knowledge and skills to with the extensive knowledge to work in a wide range of environments within the sector. There are many reasons to study at Kent: the course is accredited by the British Association of Sports Rehabilitators and Trainers (BASRaT) and you will have the chance to enhance your studies with professional placements; the campus houses the Kent Sports Clinic and is equipped with excellent facilities for students to have real world experience (you can find more information on our labs and clinics here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sport-sciences/facilities-clinics, which is actually very interesting!)
I will also attach a link to the official website where you can find out more about the course and its modules, how it is thought and how you will be assessed: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/2512/sports-therapy-rehabilitation.

If you scroll down you will be able to find out more about your lectures and the support the university offers students to pursue their academic and career goals. Your choice might also depend on how far from home you are comfortable with travelling. Canterbury is a lovely town just one train away from London, so that might be a plus! There are plenty of accommodation options both on and off campus as well :smile:

If you have any more questions, do not hesitate to ask or to contact the The School of Sport and Exercise Sciences directly (you can find more about that here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/sport-sciences/) or book your spot for an open day here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/open-days

Here is a link to a postgraduate course you might be interested in: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/154/sport-and-exercise-science-and-sports-therapy

I hope this was helpful and best of luck!


Tracy
UKC Rep

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