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    Universities don't translate your name on Latin certificates because it isn't your name and that means the certificate isn't valid.

    Btw I have a Latin certificate.
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    Hmm, I'm interested to see whether mine will be, my uni sets a lot of store behind Latin. I don't know about it actually being 'valid', when I am in the Gaeltacht, my name becomes Caitriona Ni Bhraonain and that's how I'm entered onto the records and attendance sheets and stuff. I think they can Latin-ize your name if they want. The baptism registers show loads of names entered in Latin when the name would be English/Irish..that doesn't mean the baptism wasn't valid..
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Universities don't translate your name on Latin certificates because it isn't your name and that means the certificate isn't valid.
    Well, the example I provided was genuine. Plus I imagine several Gaelic speakers, for example, translate their mundane names into Gaelic and sign in another language. I can see no lawful grounds for it invalidating a grant either: it certainly is not a material flaw in the grant, nor does it change the intent to have the person as a graduate in good standing of the university.

    Equally I doubt that if, say, St Andrews were to conduct its business as the "University of St Andrews" it would be any less valid than business conducted under its proper name of "Universitas Sancti Andreae apud Scotos". Whilst the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 gives universities the right to sue and be sued under their modern English names, it does not change them. Interestingly enough, I note that the university has mysteriously changed English names some time between the 1858 Act and the 20th century ones: becoming "St Andrews" instead of "St Andrew's".
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Well, the example I provided was genuine. Plus I imagine several Gaelic speakers, for example, translate their mundane names into Gaelic and sign in another language. I can see no lawful grounds for it invalidating a grant either: it certainly is not a material flaw in the grant, nor does it change the intent to have the person as a graduate in good standing of the university.
    I'm sure it was but it was also quite a few decades ago as well. Things have changed and people are far more unremitting on matters of detail as far as identity are concerned nowadays. For example for the Gaelic name to be a valid legal moniker it would have to be registered as an alias (I have several friends who have such aliases printed in their passports, for example).

    Equally I doubt that if, say, St Andrews were to conduct its business as the "University of St Andrews" it would be any less valid than business conducted under its proper name of "Universitas Sancti Andreae apud Scotos". Whilst the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 gives universities the right to sue and be sued under their modern English names, it does not change them. Interestingly enough, I note that the university has mysteriously changed English names some time between the 1858 Act and the 20th century ones: becoming "St Andrews" instead of "St Andrew's".
    What has this to do with a person's name? Unless I missed something I wasn't originally christened with a Latin name. Also, as far as I am aware the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 doesn't apply to my name.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    I'm sure it was but it was also quite a few decades ago as well. Things have changed and people are far more unremitting on matters of detail as far as identity are concerned nowadays. For example for the Gaelic name to be a valid legal moniker it would have to be registered as an alias (I have several friends who have such aliases printed in their passports, for example).
    You do not have to 'register' aliases, just as you do not have to register your name or any changes thereof. A name is valid in law insofar as you are using it and have no fraudulent intent.

    What has this to do with a person's name? Unless I missed something I wasn't originally christened with a Latin name. Also, as far as I am aware the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 doesn't apply to my name.
    A university has legal personality, but the central point was that inaccurately stating a name on a document does not affect its validity.
 
 
 
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