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mass spectrometry -as level chem

hi, I just wanted to ask -is deflection the same as ion drift in mass spectrometry?
Original post by marvelousEsther_
hi, I just wanted to ask -is deflection the same as ion drift in mass spectrometry?


Hiya, just wondering what exam board you are on?
For mine (AQA) we only need to know it as ion drift but from some research I've done, it does appear that they are similar although I can't claim that they are fully?
What does it say in your specification for this topic? Does it state you need to know deflection or ion drift?
They both describe the ions moving relative to their m/z values (they still have the same KE though) and separating based on this which is what ion drift is...
Original post by carxlinefxrbes_
Hiya, just wondering what exam board you are on?
For mine (AQA) we only need to know it as ion drift but from some research I've done, it does appear that they are similar although I can't claim that they are fully?
What does it say in your specification for this topic? Does it state you need to know deflection or ion drift?
They both describe the ions moving relative to their m/z values (they still have the same KE though) and separating based on this which is what ion drift is...

ahh! should have thought of the spec, I do aqa too and yeah it only talks about ion drift ,i guess i'll only read on that.
Thanks for answering my question :smile:.
Just so you have an explanation: Ion drift is associated with time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. It describes the motion of ions in the field-free region - where they don't accelerate or decelerate - before detection, based on m/z ratio as you say. The 'time of flight' or time of an ion to traverse the field-free region, can be linked to the mass of the ions.Ion deflection is associated with a different type of mass spectrometry - magnetic sector mass spectrometry. In this case you detect based on how sharply ions of different masses are deflected by a magnetic field (the 'extent of deflection' is related to mass here).So basically they refer to two different techniques or types of mass analyser/spectrometer, so just stick to whatever's on your spec.

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