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blissy
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#81
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#81
(Original post by an Siarach)
As far as i know abortions are only permitted when there is a real risk to the health of the mother (mental or physical) and if they are incapable of supporting it (please correct me if the law is otherwise) whereas most abortions are for far more trivial reasons. Thus the law is not enforced.
I believe that's the law. Doctors are just very lax about the risk to the health of the mother (mental or physical).
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yawn
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#82
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#82
(Original post by lessthanthree)
I was under the impression that the law regarding abortions only comes into force after [24?] weeks.

You can have an abortion for pretty much any reason up to that point, and then the law comes in.

It's generally adhered to [except when doctors shiftily refer patients to obscure countries that permit later abortion]


edit: yep.
The abortion act provides for the legal termination of a pregnancy if two doctors are of the opinion that the continuance of the pregnancy will result in physical/mental danger to the mother.

In practice we have abortion on demand up to the 24th week of gestation - albeit illegal.
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Lillith Grimore
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#83
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#83
Having said that, doctors are under no obligation when it comes to abortion and apparently there's currently a growing trend of trainee doctors opting out of abortion training and choosing other route of gynecalogical study. Also, I read a magazine article recently in which one women was increasingly distressed by her GP's attitude to her - she was preganant only due to the failure of contraception, but he refused to refer anyone, no matter how 'qualified' for an abortion they were and also refused to refer her to a doctor who would be more sympathetic. Do you really want this to happen? Wouldn't this just lead to more DIY abortions, such as ones which unfortunately seem to happen in countries such as India, with devestating effects on the mother's body and mental state?
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NDGAARONDI
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#84
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#84
(Original post by lessthanthree)
I was under the impression that the law regarding abortions only comes into force after [24?] weeks.
If an abortion is performed not following the Abortion Act then it is illegal.

(Original post by lessthanthree)
You can have an abortion for pretty much any reason up to that point, and then the law comes in.
If you get away with it.
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yawn
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#85
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#85
(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
If an abortion is performed not following the Abortion Act then it is illegal.



If you get away with it.
I really can't recall one single case where a mother has had an abortion that is not within the parameters of the Abortion Act - i.e. no proven risk to physical/mental health of the mother if the pregnancy is allowed to continue - and have not 'got away with it'.

The overwhelming numbers of abortion are because of the pregnancy not being at a 'suitable time' for the mother or father.
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Dreama
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#86
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#86
We must remember that abortion *will* occur whether it is legal or not.

The difference merely being whether or not it occurs in a sterile Hospital with qualified staff, or in a dingy backstreet with a bogus self-proclaimed doctor...

The law at present *restricts* abortion. It does not make the option easy, nor does it make it impossible. This allows citizens to choose due to their own moral beliefs which option they prefer.

It is perfectly fine and should be left well alone.
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NDGAARONDI
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#87
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#87
(Original post by yawn)
I really can't recall one single case where a mother has had an abortion that is not within the parameters of the Abortion Act
I can, and since some budding lawyers have participated here I will give a legal case - Jepson v The Chief Constable of West Mercia Police Constabulary [2003] EWHC 3318. Here is some information regarding the case http://www.spr-consilio.com/TheCurate.pdf and some media reports below:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2367917.stm
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3247916.stm
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.../02/njep02.xml

(Original post by Dreama)
We must remember that abortion *will* occur whether it is legal or not.
So does rape.

(Original post by Dreama)
The law at present *restricts* abortion. It does not make the option easy, nor does it make it impossible.
It has been widely criticised that it only does this in theory.

(Original post by Dreama)
This allows citizens to choose due to their own moral beliefs which option they prefer.
No. The Abortion Act sets out the rules relating to abortion on medical grounds. Sure moral beliefs take a part, but if a subject (not citizen, we're not in a republic) does not believe it is immoral, and goes ahead, but does not qualify in the Act, she can't have it legally.

(Original post by Dreama)
It is perfectly fine and should be left well alone.
What is it exactly?
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yawn
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#88
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#88
(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
I can, and since some budding lawyers have participated here I will give a legal case - Jepson v The Chief Constable of West Mercia Police Constabulary [2003] EWHC 3318. Here is some information regarding the case http://www.spr-consilio.com/TheCurate.pdf and some media reports below:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2367917.stm
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3247916.stm
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.../02/njep02.xml



So does rape.



It has been widely criticised that it only does this in theory.



No. The Abortion Act sets out the rules relating to abortion on medical grounds. Sure moral beliefs take a part, but if a subject (not citizen, we're not in a republic) does not believe it is immoral, and goes ahead, but does not qualify in the Act, she can't have it legally.



What is it exactly?
I apologise for not being more precise.

I was referring specifically to those cases where the mother did not have an abortion because of 'grave risk to mental/physical health but rather that she did not want to have a baby at this stage in her life.
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yawn
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#89
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#89
The Jepson case reveals how the Act can and is, abused on a regular basis. Can you imagine the abuse that would result from any law to allow for Euthanasia? :mad:
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NDGAARONDI
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#90
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#90
(Original post by yawn)
The Jepson case reveals how the Act can and is, abused on a regular basis. Can you imagine the abuse that would result from any law to allow for Euthanasia? :mad:
All privileges are abused I'm afraid. I myself have been in a debate about this with my law lecturer at college and stated he's against euthanasia on grounds of abuse but seemed fine with abortion. I think Jepson suggests otherwise. Even if there were effects to catch these people and prosecute them, a lot of pro-life (not necessarily meaning only anti-abortion) would be happier than they are now, even if the success rate is not exactly high.

I might see if I can get a medical law book on this
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Howard
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#91
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#91
(Original post by NDGAARONDI)
All privileges are abused I'm afraid. I myself have been in a debate about this with my law lecturer at college and stated he's against euthanasia on grounds of abuse but seemed fine with abortion. I think Jepson suggests otherwise. Even if there were effects to catch these people and prosecute them, a lot of pro-life (not necessarily meaning only anti-abortion) would be happier than they are now, even if the success rate is not exactly high.

I might see if I can get a medical law book on this
There are excellent cases for abortion and euthanasia IMO. In fact I seem to meet on a daily basis people who are a walking argument for abortion.
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NDGAARONDI
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#92
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#92
(Original post by Howard)
There are excellent cases for abortion and euthanasia IMO. In fact I seem to meet on a daily basis people who are a walking argument for abortion.
You do realise that your statement can work against you?
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RieLouise
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#93
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#93
(Original post by yawn)
I don't think your views on sex are 'screwed up Catholic upbringing' - I do wish people wouldn't denigrate themselves or a faith in this way. I think that your view of sex as something profound that needs to be reserved for a long term relationship says much about your self-esteem and that is good. Why should you join the thinking of the masses who believe they are only good for 'shagging' the country's population?

I shouldn't worry about the attitude of the men you have come into contact with. That is a subtle way of making you think there is something wrong with you rather than them - as a means of 'protecting' their supply of free sex. If all girls felt as good about themselves as you do, the male population risk repetitive wrist injury and blindness.
Sorry. Never spotted this. But thank you. I wish most of the men I've encountered agreed with you. I've even had the line,'It's because you've been abused or something, isn't it', thrown at me because I refuse to jump into bed with a guy within the first five minutes of meeting them.

This may mean that I end up alone but I have sufficient inner resources to deal with that and I'm not going to compromise myself...for anyone.
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