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    (Original post by Holty-Dave)
    Oxbridge academically stimulates you but you're not set for the real world come the end of it unlike more rounded universities
    That's a rather sweeping comment.

    What about all the society activity - theatre, comedy, debating, sport, anything you can imagine really! There's TONS going on.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Who are you calling riffraff? :p:
    Oh, hello, I didnt see you there :angel:
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    Lol.

    This is why I've never wanted to go to Oxbridge.

    Snobbery at Cambridge.. a revolutionary concept!

    (Awaits bashing from Oxbridge students - hurrah)

    EDIT: Although I wouldn't get in anyway because im from Essex too :p:
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    (Original post by blissy)
    That's a rather sweeping comment.

    What about all the society activity - theatre, comedy, debating, sport, anything you can imagine really! There's TONS going on.
    Yeah, in Cambridge, everyone seems to do about three sports, act, play musical instruments, occupy positions in JCR or societies or whatever. As far as I can tell from my friends from home at other unis, they are doing hardly any extra curricular stuff. Maybe my friends from home are all incredibly lazy but the more rounded people seem to be in Cambridge.
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    (Original post by Superhellie)
    no need to get personal geese.
    I want a personal goose.
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    (Original post by Holty-Dave)
    Oxbridge academically stimulates you but you're not set for the real world come the end of it unlike more rounded universities
    What a complete pile of crap. Care to elaborate?
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    (Original post by LH123)
    UMS scores are very indicative at at least how good at exams a student is, but also intelligence. Someone who just scrapes an A is, and I use this term lightly, worse than someone who gets 100%, or 90%, surely? Until A*'s come in UMS's are important for Cambridge for exactly that reason.
    I don't fully agree with this. My experience has been that UMS scores and exams have not been representative of my capacity at a subject (eg getting As in mock exams and Es in exams for no reason), nor of the capacity of a few other very intelligent people I'd met. Also I can appreciate people losing faith in the system, when I found that the mark schemes we used to mark our own practice papers with would often be overly narrow and prescriptive. For instance in Biology, a two mark question might require the use of two key words that the particular syllabus favoured in their own text book, despite the fact that more than one scientific term for the same thing might be accepted in the broader scientific community. More than one exam board came up in the paper for paying markers per paper, and also for hiring graduates without good english. Many schools are switching to IB or IGCSEs. I'm sure you're right that overall it is a good indicator, but I think it isn't necessarily reliable. Fortunately Cambridge are very open minded and look at several factors.

    (Original post by Superhellie)
    you are all really mean. ha.
    i am allowed me opinion!
    and i dont like the applications prodcedures so nerrrrrrrr.
    gay.
    Nobody's saying you're not allowed your own opinion. However, the assumptions of your opinion discourage alot of people from considering Cambridge or Oxford in their University choices, so its a very harmful opinion as well as being wrong!
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I don't fully agree with this. My experience has been that UMS scores and exams have not been representative of my capacity at a subject (eg getting As in mock exams and Es in exams for no reason), nor of the capacity of a few other very intelligent people I'd met. Also I can appreciate people losing faith in the system, when I found that the mark schemes we used to mark our own practice papers with would often be overly narrow and prescriptive. For instance in Biology, a two mark question might require the use of two key words that the particular syllabus favoured in their own text book, despite the fact that more than one scientific term for the same thing might be accepted in the broader scientific community. More than one exam board came up in the paper for paying markers per paper, and also for hiring graduates without good english. Many schools are switching to IB or IGCSEs. I'm sure you're right that overall it is a good indicator, but I think it isn't necessarily reliable. Fortunately Cambridge are very open minded and look at several factors.

    Well I meant in most cases, of course not all.
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    (Original post by Jacinta)
    Please may I ask where exactly you go/went to university? Or whether you even go/went at all? I can't tell by your response...

    Also, define 'riff raff'. Someone who's not in public school with bucketloads of money earned by mummy and daddy? You can be intelligent enough to get in to Oxbridge with a state education and an average upbringing without being 'riff raff', as you so articulately put it.

    Come on, you could at least credit your elitism with a decent argument!
    Lol. Daz was definitely not at all serious with his post. (although I appreciate that if it had been posted by someone else I wouldn't have known the difference)
    He graduated from Politics at Keele. He's no elitist.
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    (Original post by LH123)
    Well I meant in most cases, of course not all.
    Sure. I tend to get quite excitable when topics like grades and exams are mentioned :o:
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    (Original post by jcb914)
    What a complete pile of crap. Care to elaborate?
    You spend all your day around intellectuals. In most other universities there is more diversity in terms of intelligence levels and social class. Therefore in the real world you won't be able to handle the variation. Also you are encouraged to grow academically rather than grow as a person and that comes through going out having fun often and not just through books.

    The people from my school who went to oxbridge, nobody doubts their intellectual brilliance but as a person, they weren't socially smart and even naive to a certain extent. My point is Oxbridge drills people to achieve academic success rather than the whole 'student experience'. Part of the reason I declined to go there.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Sure. I tend to get quite excitable when topics like grades and exams are mentioned :o:
    Fair enough. I know for a fact that I did not do as well in my exams as my intelligence would allow, whether it is for the reasons you stated - bad marking - or merely because I am a lazy ******* is out for the jury at the moment. :^_^:
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    (Original post by SuperDaz)
    Oh, hello, I didnt see you there :angel:
    I was cunningly camouflaged as riffraff :dontknow:
    (Original post by Scipio90)
    I want a personal goose.
    Apparently Caius have some ancient rule that allows people with firsts to keep goats penned up in one of their courts. Will that do?
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    (Original post by Holty-Dave)
    You spend all your day around intellectuals. In most other universities there is more diversity in terms of intelligence levels and social class. Therefore in the real world you won't be able to handle the variation. Also you are encouraged to grow academically rather than grow as a person and that comes through going out having fun often and not just through books.
    Well firstly, the 'student experience' would have made me deeply unhappy, as it isn't my way of having fun at all!

    Secondly, I worked in Wetherspoon's kitchen for two and a half years (a year of which was full time) as well as a range of other places to support myself, and went to a college who's own students called it a chav college.

    Is that prepared enough for 'real life' for you? :rolleyes:

    Moral of the story - don't generalise!
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Lol. Daz was definitely not at all serious with his post. (although I appreciate that if it had been posted by someone else I wouldn't have known the difference)
    He graduated from Politics at Keele. He's no elitist.
    Oh dear...fell for it hook line and sinker!
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    (Original post by Holty-Dave)
    You spend all your day around intellectuals. In most other universities there is more diversity in terms of intelligence levels and social class. Therefore in the real world you won't be able to handle the variation. Also you are encouraged to grow academically rather than grow as a person and that comes through going out having fun often and not just through books.

    The people from my school who went to oxbridge, nobody doubts their intellectual brilliance but as a person, they weren't socially smart and even naive to a certain extent. My point is Oxbridge drills people to achieve academic success rather than the whole 'student experience'. Part of the reason I declined to go there.
    That's deeply flawed.

    Firstly, Oxbridge students (not that there is such a generalised thing) can have just as much "going out having fun" as other students. It's about how you manage your time. Work hard, play hard. It's simple. Many students here choose to go out 4, 5 or even every night of the week.

    Secondly, you claim that Oxbridge students tend not to be "socially smart". I'm not sure exactly what you mean by this, but the supervision system encourages and develops communication skills and the vast array of extra curricular activities (and things such as formal hall swaps, networking events with big firms...etc...) means there is plenty opportunity for students to be social. Then there are the long vacations - again, loads of time to get a job and socialise.

    In addition, there might not be so much diversity in terms of intelligence, but there is diversity in social class and background. Plenty in fact. It's hilarious that you seem to think we are trapped in the library all day around other "intellectuals" and that as soon as we walk out into the real world we "can't deal with the variation". It's true, I freak out when I go to Sainsbury's and get served by someone who doesn't have five A grades at A-Level and a detailed academic knowledge of some obscure topic. :rolleyes:
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    Perhaps a tad harsh, but by the end I couldn't help thinking: "Good for you :indiff:". I mean it's great that she enjoyed her time at Warwick so much, but it all seems like a lot of trouble just to prove the point that she couldn't care less about the interview.
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    Wiki Support Team
    Intrestng article
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    I was rejected from Oxford in 2007. Not because of elitism - simply because the candidate they interviewed next was better.
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    (Original post by Holty-Dave)
    You spend all your day around intellectuals. In most other universities there is more diversity in terms of intelligence levels and social class. Therefore in the real world you won't be able to handle the variation. Also you are encouraged to grow academically rather than grow as a person and that comes through going out having fun often and not just through books.

    The people from my school who went to oxbridge, nobody doubts their intellectual brilliance but as a person, they weren't socially smart and even naive to a certain extent. My point is Oxbridge drills people to achieve academic success rather than the whole 'student experience'. Part of the reason I declined to go there.
    "Declined to go there"? Did you even apply?:confused:
 
 
 
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