Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I got the impression from the newspaper article that she couldn't identify that what she was shown was Greek. Personally, I'd expect any applicant to any university to be able to identify writing in Greek (as opposed to translate it).
    Honestly? That's like saying all prospective hairdressers should be able to identify at least three Barry Manilow tracks.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Honestly? That's like saying all prospective hairdressers should be able to identify at least three Barry Manilow tracks.
    No, but it is like saying that all university aspirants should be able to identify that writing is in the Greek alphabet. She must have been the only applicant that year who couldn't.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arisk01)
    oh yes, because they can take everyone on... someone doesn't get in so they blame anything they can
    It doesn't even say whether she got in or not. She just talks about the snobbery of the interviewer - maybe she went to Warwick due to choice, since the people at Trinity were - like someone who comes to mind - rather up themselves.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Honestly? That's like saying all prospective hairdressers should be able to identify at least three Barry Manilow tracks.
    I COULD DO THAT!!!! Copacabana, Weekend in New England and Mandy!!! :yep:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Honestly? That's like saying all prospective hairdressers should be able to identify at least three Barry Manilow tracks.
    Greek does have some relation to English literature though, albeit not a big one. Even so, I'd expect most people (and by extension a fair number of English literature interviewees) to be able to recognise, say, Greek and Cyrillic. But it wouldn't really matter if you were unable to; it's not terribly important.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    No, but it is like saying that all university aspirants should be able to identify that writing is in the Greek alphabet. She must have been the only applicant that year who couldn't.
    Perhaps (although I'd argue otherwise), but nevertheless it's completely irrelevant. The girl in the article aside, testing cultural references not related to the course of study may well hinder applicants with a good aptitude for the course. That's why the Oxbridge admissions tests were removed. Cultural references are likely to be class-bound; I, for one, wouldn't have been able to identify Greek until recently. Maybe I'm just an amoeba.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The West Wing)
    I COULD DO THAT!!!! Copacabana, Weekend in New England and Mandy!!! :yep:
    May the cutting commence!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I got the impression from the newspaper article that she couldn't identify that what she was shown was Greek. Personally, I'd expect any applicant to any university to be able to identify writing in Greek (as opposed to translate it).
    What about Cyrillic though? The two are too similar (don't mistaken this for identical, having studied cyrillic, I do appreciate the significant differences between the two alphabets) to expect anyone, at first sight, to distinguish between the two.

    hobnob, I wasn't suggesting that she should translate it, but a recognition of its existence and the role it could play within the context of the text is probably all that was required.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The West Wing)
    Copacabana, Weekend in New England and Mandy!!! :yep:
    That's all Greek to me.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ploop)
    What about cyrillic though? The two are too similar (don't mistaken this for identical, having studied cyrillic, I do appreciate the significant differences between the two alphabets) to expect anyone, at first sight, to distinguish between the two.
    You reckon? But one's all light bluey, and the other's kind of imposing and purple...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    People like that *sighs*. I was interviewed at the same college last year. Yes, it was terrifying. Yes, I felt small. It's not supposed to be easy, though - and she just sounds bitter. If she was that bothered, she should have just had another go. Plenty of people don't get in every year. It's not really a press matter.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by The West Wing)
    I COULD DO THAT!!!! Copacabana, Weekend in New England and Mandy!!! :yep:
    You do realise that someone will use that against you in the next SPS-isn't-a-real-subject joke, don't you?:p:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    No, but it is like saying that all university aspirants should be able to identify that writing is in the Greek alphabet. She must have been the only applicant that year who couldn't.
    I sure hope not, I'd fail miserably. Anything I didn't use in a maths equation, I'm not familiar with :P and yes, I could call it cyrillic.

    Was that tutor rude to her? Is it possible that she wasn't given the same prep time as everybody else and that she wasn't asked one single English-related question? and does Griffiths really hate Essex girls?
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Perhaps (although I'd argue otherwise), but nevertheless it's completely irrelevant. The girl in the article aside, testing cultural references not related to the course of study may well hinder applicants with a good aptitude for the course. That's why the Oxbridge admissions tests were removed. Cultural references are likely to be class-bound; I, for one, wouldn't have been able to identify Greek until recently. Maybe I'm just an amoeba.
    Oh, come on. "Class-bound cultural references"? To recognise Greek letters as Greek?:rolleyes: Again, there are tons of texts in English literature which contain references to Greek writers and include quotations in Greek. Surely you're not suggesting that her class somehow prevented her from reading those?
    Incidentally, as far as I could tell, that article mentioned nothing about her class, which (seeing as it was after all an article in the Guardian) I'd take as an indication that she wasn't in fact working-class or they'd have put more of an emphasis on that.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Ploop)
    hobnob, I wasn't suggesting that she should translate it, but a recognition of its existence and the role it could play within the context of the text is probably all that was required.
    Of course. I was agreeing with you.
    (My apologies if that wasn't clear, but I've got a nasty cold at the moment, and my brain isn't fully functional.)
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jismith1989)
    To be fair, mathematicians do use the Greek alphabet. I don't know what the characters symbolise, because I'm not that intelligent, however!
    I'm well aware of that. I idea that only mathematicians should have any knowledge of it is hilarious, though.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hobnob)
    Oh, come on. "Class-bound cultural references"? To recognise Greek letters as Greek?:rolleyes: Again, there are tons of texts in English literature which contain references to Greek writers and include quotations in Greek. Surely you're not suggesting that her class somehow prevented her from reading those?
    Incidentally, as far as I could tell, that article mentioned nothing about her class, which (seeing as it was after all an article in the Guardian) I'd take as an indication that she wasn't in fact working-class or they'd have put more of an emphasis on that.
    No, I'm not suggesting that her class prevented her from picking up Greek references in English literature. I am saying that it's perfectly possible, though, to have a good knowledge English literature without coming across such references. And, if such references haven't been encountered, it may be harder to pick up that knowledge on a council estate and state school, for example, than a private school, house in the Home Counties and regular Mediterranean holidays. Of course that is generalisation, but it doesn't diminish the core fact that one can be have excellent potential for an English Literature degree at the highest-level without being able to identify the Greek alphabet (as one can surely have great potential for a Greek language course without knowledge of English literature).

    Well, the article was written by the girl herself, so the Guardian's editorial policy isn't relevant. To generalise, however, I don't think that "Trace from Essex" sounds very middle-class. I certainly could be wrong though. Anyway, class is simply correlational; it's not my main point, as expressed in the last clause of the first paragraph.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    You reckon? But one's all light bluey, and the other's kind of imposing and purple...
    That's unfair against the colour blinded then.

    (Original post by hobnob)
    Of course. I was agreeing with you.
    (My apologies if that wasn't clear, but I've got a nasty cold at the moment, and my brain isn't fully functional.)
    My mistake actually, I misread your post. A hobnob running at less than full capacity is evidently a hobnob that's still more than a match for TSRers.

    I was thinking, once I get my rejection in the post, perhaps I should start work on my article filled with histrionics, bias and embellishment. The problem is, which paper should I target? I think I might go for a slightly parodic effect, playing on a privately schooled aspect, with an upper-middle class upbringing, private Oxbridge orientated tuition and a posh accent all going against me? It could well be Oxbridge's next big rejection scandal.

    Disclaimer: The above parody may or may not be an accurate representation of the real Ploop, but almost certainly not.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Obviously we don't know the context but I doubt a general applicant for English would be required to be able to read the Greek alphabet. But from reading the article there is no reason to think she was expected to and in fact it sounds like she was complaining at the suggestion that she couldn't recognise a line of Greek.

    The whole point of Oxbridge interviews is that you are not expected to know everything they throw at you. We don't have the full details but the evidence for ridicule is quite weak.
    Offline

    20
    Oxford>Cambridge, by every account I've heard.

    And that's that.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.