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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Oxford>Cambridge, by every account I've heard.

    And that's that.
    You were sadly misinformed.
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    (Original post by Superhellie)
    no. not year round. just term time bubbles. they pop every few months and let their students roam free for a few weeks. this time is cherished time.
    Can you please stop voicing your opinion as though it is fact?

    You can easily include words like:
    "I was under the impression that..."
    "Surely x leads to y result?"
    "Doesn't n create a problem in such and such a regard?" These would convey the opinion that you have without giving the impression that you know more than everyone else on the thread, even the people who are studying in these Universities!

    With respect to your suggestion that we don't get 'me' time - look at my post count! Sheez! If that doesn't count for 'me time' And as to holidays, most students need to work over their holidays to afford their degrees. Additionally often we have loads of work or extra reading to cover over the holidays. And holidays are no more 'cherished' than term time (which people love) by the end of a holiday, people are usually very bored and quite excited to return to college. Most come back up as soon as college will let them.
    (Original post by Tootles)
    Oxford>Cambridge, by every account I've heard.

    And that's that.
    *checks post history for the matching post stating the opposite in the Oxford forum*
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Personally, I'd expect any applicant to any university to be able to identify writing in Greek (as opposed to translate it).
    No, I disagree entirely. Recognition of the greek alphabet is entirely cultural (in the context of her application to read English not Classics) Its like if I was discriminated against for not knowing who Simon Cowel was simply because I never watch tv. If her offer did not include any A levels that would have exposed her to Greek, then it really cannot be acceptable.

    The only context in which I might be entirely wrong is if GCSEs in England include teaching people latin and greek suffixes and prefixes in grammar? I didn't do GCSEs, but I was taught a few basics through IGCSE. However, these were introduced to me in our own alphabet, so without some cultural exposure linked to my family and my educational environment I certainly would not recognise the greek alphabet myself, and I wouldn't suggest that this implies anything about my potential.

    Good Bloke, did they expose you to the greek alphabet when you were at school? The Trinity Interviewer probably remembers having it drilled into him at some awful boarding school when he was a boy :rolleyes:
    (Original post by Azzrahelle)
    Is it possible that she wasn't given the same prep time as everybody else...
    To me this is the least unlikely claim in the article. My experience of both interviews was that they were very methodical and systematic about these kind of tasks. These would have been assigned before she had talked to anyone other than the porters too! Time is obviously a very subjective experience when you're under such pressure, and she may have been predisposed to fear the worst about their potential attitude towards her.
    (Original post by hobnob)
    Oh, come on. "Class-bound cultural references"? To recognise Greek letters as Greek?:rolleyes: Again, there are tons of texts in English literature which contain references to Greek writers and include quotations in Greek. Surely you're not suggesting that her class somehow prevented her from reading those?
    As previously said, I'm certainly with JSmith on this one.
    I went to college with several individuals who very likely wouldn't recognise the greek alphabet. Our E.Lit A level was entirely void of any such exposure. They battled with the religious lexis of John Donne and George Herbert for goodness sake!
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    (Original post by Superhellie)
    so... you need to cram everything in basically. squeeeeeeeeeeeeeze every second out of your university years eh?
    what about "me" time?
    dont get none of that do you!

    you can go to amazing universitys and get amazing degrees and have an AMAZING time... without having to put 12 hours work a day in (again this is the figure i have heard from friends at cambridge)
    why bother when you dont have to put so much stress on yourself?
    Omg...

    Seriously, 'me time'? I'm at Cambridge and last year I watched on average about 3 hours of TV everyday, had a lie-in pretty much every single day on top of having a social life and getting my work done (getting a 2.i) It's not impossible! 12 hours a day is a complete exaggeration, and I rarely feel stressed here, if at all. I can honestly say I'm really, really happy here and will be gutted when I graduate!

    Cambridge often attracts people who put pressure on themselves and who work hard. So even if you were right that loads of people do ridiculous amounts of work here, they would probably have done the same at any other university. I personally prefer a bit more pressure-- writing 8 essays a term rather than 1 is surely going to make me better at my subject.
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    So this has turned into a Cam hate thread then.

    I don't see what the fuss is about. So she had a terrible interview. This happens. Perhaps her interviewer was unfair on her, I don't know. One ccan hardly claim that this is representative.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    As previously said, I'm certainly with JSmith on this one.
    I went to college with several individuals who very likely wouldn't recognise the greek alphabet. Our E.Lit A level was entirely void of any such exposure. They battled with the religious lexis of John Donne and George Herbert for goodness sake!
    I'm sorry, but I still find it extremely hard to believe that a seventeen-year-old wouldn't have come across at least a couple of Greek letters in his life (even if it's just alpha, omega and pi) and be able to recognise them as Greek letters...
    But even if I give you that, it isn't terribly hard to deduce that a line of text is Greek, because there aren't actually that many foreign languages which are likely to turn up in a random English-literature-related text: Latin doesn't use a different alphabet - and neither do French, German or Italian - and that only leaves Greek, really.:dontknow:
    (OK, theoretically there may be quotes in Hebrew as well, but that would only really be an option if the context suggested it was a quote from the Old Testament.)
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    I'm sorry, but I still find it extremely hard to believe that a seventeen-year-old wouldn't have come across at least a couple of Greek letters in his life (even if it's just alpha, omega and pi) and be able to recognise them as Greek letters...
    That's ok I think you would find it very easy to believe if you'd been to my college for A level, though. Or held any of my jobs in Andover.
    (Original post by hobnob)
    But even if I give you that, it isn't terribly hard to deduce that a line of text is Greek, because there aren't actually that many foreign languages which are likely to turn up in a random English-literature-related text: Latin doesn't use a different alphabet - and neither do French, German or Italian - and that only leaves Greek, really.:dontknow:
    (OK, theoretically there may be quotes in Hebrew as well, but that would only really be an option if the context suggested it was a quote from the Old Testament.)
    Once again, this is cultural. I'm only repeating myself, but I had top marks in my English Lit A level without any reference to other languages coming into play at all. Its quite conceivable for a state school applicant to excel academically, without GCSEs or A level providing any of this background awareness! In my college most students had lived locally for their entire lives, and their parents had ordinary local jobs. It was very culturally isolated. There was absolutely no need for anyone to be aware of any foreign languages, and most weren't well read.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Once again, this is cultural. I'm only repeating myself, but I had top marks in my English Lit A level without any reference to other languages coming into play at all. Its quite conceivable for a state school applicant to excel academically, without GCSEs or A level providing any of this background awareness! In my college most students had lived locally for their entire lives, and their parents had ordinary local jobs. It was very culturally isolated. There was absolutely no need for anyone to be aware of any foreign languages, and most weren't well read.
    Hmm, looks like I had an incredibly elitist upbringing without realising it, then...

    But surely even if you had never actually come across any foreign language quotes in texts you studied for your A-levels, you'd be aware of the languages most likely to be quoted or referred to, on the basis of cultural and literary influences (about which you should at least know enough to make an educated guess if you really were that keen to do a degree in English)?
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    (Original post by asdasta)
    The whole scoffing at Essex thing is pretty disgusting, really.
    A typical response from someone doing a doss subject like Film Studies or English Literature.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Hmm, looks like I had an incredibly elitist upbringing without realising it, then...
    I also assumed that everything I knew was common knowledge until I moved to England. It was the first time in my life I realised that I had a relatively privileged upbringing. Culturally if not financially.
    (Original post by hobnob)
    But surely even if you had never actually come across any foreign language quotes in texts you studied for your A-levels, you'd be aware of the languages most likely to be quoted or referred to, on the basis of cultural and literary influences (about which you should at least know enough to make an educated guess if you really were that keen to do a degree in English)?
    Yeh maybe. Personally I found the requirements of E.Lit at A level very undemanding. It was possible to do very well by simply having read the books and having opinions about them, and being good at writing in a structured, logical way. No extra knowledge was needed at all! We had Metaphysical Poetry, A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess, Othello, Danny Abse (Welsh poet - so I suppose we had some gaelic) The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde, Poor Things (forgot author) The Wasp Factory Iain Banks, and Dr Faustus Christopher Marlowe. So all of these were based in English history. We were encouraged to look it up, but mostly didn't bother. The closest might have been nadsat used by Burgess in The Clockwork Orange. We were taught that this was influenced by Russian. But no more than that - just a mention. And none of this level of background knowledge was needed to do well!

    Maybe Oxbridge would expect that knowledge as an indicator that the person is widely interested and proactive in seeking knowledge? I can't argue with that I suppose!
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    (Original post by DoMakeSayThink)
    A typical response from someone doing a doss subject like Film Studies or English Literature.
    Do you mean at A level or Uni?

    And scoffing is certainly disgusting if that was what actually happened!
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    My best friend went for an interview there 2 years ago. They called him weird for being a lib dem and the girl that went in before him came out crying :|
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I also assumed that everything I knew was common knowledge until I moved to England. It was the first time in my life I realised that I had a relatively privileged upbringing. Culturally if not financially.
    OK, I suppose I'd better shut up, then.:o:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    OK, I suppose I'd better shut up, then.:o:
    Lol, well my repeating myself doesn't necessary make me more right :p: Its just an opinion, albeit a strong one, based on subjective experience.
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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    You reckon? But one's all light bluey, and the other's kind of imposing and purple...
    Even before you've learnt which characters belong to which? If so, that's pretty awesome.
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    (Original post by Scipio90)
    Even before you've learnt which characters belong to which? If so, that's pretty awesome.
    Yep, although it's more confusing because each character also has a colour/personality of its own. Even so, I think that's how I go about telling writing systems apart. What this indicates is that my brain is somehow categorising the scripts according to certain characteristic features they possess, which suggests that they are sufficiently distinct that people should be able to have a go at telling the letters apart, even if they don't percieve the categorisation synaesthetically. Interaction with English orthography and similarities between the writing systems kind of weakens this analysis though.
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    (Original post by Supergrunch)
    which suggests that they are sufficiently distinct that people should be able to have a go at telling the letters apart, even if they don't view the categorisation synaesthetically.
    Wow, that is interesting.
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    (Original post by Ploop)
    I was thinking, once I get my rejection in the post, perhaps I should start work on my article filled with histrionics, bias and embellishment. The problem is, which paper should I target? I think I might go for a slightly parodic effect, playing on a privately schooled aspect, with an upper-middle class upbringing, private Oxbridge orientated tuition and a posh accent all going against me? It could well be Oxbridge's next big rejection scandal
    Hmm, there have been so many articles like that in the Guardian, how about the Sun for a change? Although I suppose they might be more interested in publishing something along the lines of "New Oxbridge Admissions Scandal - Cambridge Reject Girl with Big Breasts (and six As)". Followed by an article about how the Cambridge interview process blatantly favours ugly and/or nerdy-looking applicants and genuinely fit-looking applicants are being cruelly discriminated against etc etc.

    There's always the Daily Mail, though, as long as you manage to find a way of somehow blaming New Labour as well as Oxbridge.
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    yeah everyone from my school who went to Oxbridge was a right pretentious knob.

    same with my friends school, and my sister's school.

    and half the oxbridge students on here are a right barrel of laughs too.. *snore*

    however ONE MUST NOT GENERALISE... despite the majority of Oxbridge students on here constantly generalising that everyone who doesn't go to Oxbridge thinks they are snobs.

    Oh but that's generalising too..

    So what if you generalise! Most of the time its true anyway. :rolleyes:

    EDIT: you'll notice i said nothing wrong here so don't get all defensive on me! heehee
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    (Original post by Azzrahelle)
    I sure hope not, I'd fail miserably. Anything I didn't use in a maths equation, I'm not familiar with :P and yes, I could call it cyrillic.

    Was that tutor rude to her? Is it possible that she wasn't given the same prep time as everybody else and that she wasn't asked one single English-related question? and does Griffiths really hate Essex girls?
    He is known for being a bit of a character. Having seen his lectures, I don't doubt that the girl had an unpleasant interview; if you don't like his sense of humour, it can appear very offensive. It's just sad that this is suddenly being taken as the blueprint for Cambridge interviews when it's just an unfortunate, one-off case. And as far as I know, he doesn't interview anymore.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    No, I disagree entirely. Recognition of the greek alphabet is entirely cultural (in the context of her application to read English not Classics) Its like if I was discriminated against for not knowing who Simon Cowel was simply because I never watch tv. If her offer did not include any A levels that would have exposed her to Greek, then it really cannot be acceptable.

    The only context in which I might be entirely wrong is if GCSEs in England include teaching people latin and greek suffixes and prefixes in grammar? I didn't do GCSEs, but I was taught a few basics through IGCSE. However, these were introduced to me in our own alphabet, so without some cultural exposure linked to my family and my educational environment I certainly would not recognise the greek alphabet myself, and I wouldn't suggest that this implies anything about my potential.

    Good Bloke, did they expose you to the greek alphabet when you were at school? The Trinity Interviewer probably remembers having it drilled into him at some awful boarding school when he was a boy :rolleyes:
    Perhaps you are right. It is just another sign of the demise of British education in the noughties.

    I went to school at a time when people were actually taught English grammar, but I was incidentally exposed to the Greek alphabet in maths and general life, as a widely-read individual. How can you learn about the alphabet without some exposure to Greek, for heaven's sake?

    I recognise that I certainly shouldn't have said all aspiring undergraduates, in any case; I had forgotten that degrees are now given for courses that had entry qualifications as low as GCE O levels in my day.

    However, I stand by the view that anyone aspiring to an elite tertiary institution should be able to recognise the Greek and Cyrillic alphabets.

    It makes me wonder how many people can recognise the Latin alphabet and Arabic numbers as such, these days. :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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