LLB Law needed for SQE?

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evaaa.1
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#1
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#1
Hey,
I’m interested in applying for either LLB Law or law with criminology. As this will be in the 2023/24 academic year I won’t be doing the traditional LPC which needs the LLB.
Would it matter if I did a standard BA Law with Criminology then go on to do the SQE to become a solicitor?
I’m not sure exactly on what career I want to do yet within the legal sector, although becoming a barrister doesnt interest me so I’m not worried about how it would impact on doing the bar etc. I just don’t want to limit my options and end up having to do a conversion course if I decide to go down the solicitor route.
Thanks
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Gmaster1980
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#2
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#2
(Original post by evaaa.1)
Hey,
I’m interested in applying for either LLB Law or law with criminology. As this will be in the 2023/24 academic year I won’t be doing the traditional LPC which needs the LLB.
Would it matter if I did a standard BA Law with Criminology then go on to do the SQE to become a solicitor?
I’m not sure exactly on what career I want to do yet within the legal sector, although becoming a barrister doesnt interest me so I’m not worried about how it would impact on doing the bar etc. I just don’t want to limit my options and end up having to do a conversion course if I decide to go down the solicitor route.
Thanks
Depending on the type of firms you target, you may still be asked to do a conversion if you haven't done a proper llb in the traditional sense. But its really unclear at the moment what firms will mandate when it comes to the sqe
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BarryScott2022
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If the LLB is a qualifying degree then surely, as you do the prerequisite 75% of modules needed, then it should be fine.

Not true what GMaster says as do bear in mind 50% of solicitors (even MC) don’t have a law first degree so you don’t need a law degree. But if you have a qualifying one then you don’t need to do a law postgrad before the SQE. However all that is moot, as in theory you can now also do the SQE without a law degree, in practice, I’m not sure how easy that would be.
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Gmaster1980
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(Original post by BarryScott2022)
If the LLB is a qualifying degree then surely, as you do the prerequisite 75% of modules needed, then it should be fine.

Not true what GMaster says as do bear in mind 50% of solicitors (even MC) don’t have a law first degree so you don’t need a law degree. But if you have a qualifying one then you don’t need to do a law postgrad before the SQE. However all that is moot, as in theory you can now also do the SQE without a law degree, in practice, I’m not sure how easy that would be.
Why do you think what I wrote is untrue?
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BarryScott2022
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Because if it’s a qualifying law degree why would they be asked to redo it. A qualifying LLB is a ‘proper’ law degree just with some other modules offered. They have fulfilled the 75% or whatever figure needed to have a ‘proper’ law degree.

And you can take the SQE without a law degree now.
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BarryScott2022
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#6
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I do agree however that most prestigious law firms would possibly not look at someone with an SQE but without any other formal law training (of which a qualifying LLB would be). But many MC firms take graduates of non law degrees according to Chambers.
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BarryScott2022
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Gmaster1980
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(Original post by BarryScott2022)
Because if it’s a qualifying law degree why would they be asked to redo it. A qualifying LLB is a ‘proper’ law degree just with some other modules offered. They have fulfilled the 75% or whatever figure needed to have a ‘proper’ law degree.

And you can take the SQE without a law degree now.
Well that's a big if, we don't know if it's a qualifying law degree, I've come across law and criminology BAs that aren't in the past. So it's very possible a firm would still expect a gdl or similar course prior to an SQE course and then training. But as I said originally, it depends on the firm.
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BarryScott2022
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(Original post by Gmaster1980)
Well that's a big if, we don't know if it's a qualifying law degree, I've come across law and criminology BAs that aren't in the past. So it's very possible a firm would still expect a gdl or similar course prior to an SQE course and then training. But as I said originally, it depends on the firm.
The OP mentions LLB law with criminology & then a BA later. That’s why I stated if it’s a ‘qualifying’ degree then they will be ok. I effectively went further with an explanation. Did you not feel the need to mention this if you’re giving advice?
Regardless, you do not need a law degree now for SQE, however I did say in practice I’m not sure how this would work.
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Gmaster1980
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(Original post by BarryScott2022)
The OP mentions LLB law with criminology & then a BA later. That’s why I stated if it’s a ‘qualifying’ degree then they will be ok. I effectively went further with an explanation. Did you not feel the need to mention this if you’re giving advice?
Regardless, you do not need a law degree now for SQE, however I did say in practice I’m not sure how this would work.
In practice no City firms would hire someone who hadn't covered the legal principles in their undergrad, nor would most large in house teams, but smaller companies and high street firms might. To your question, as "qualifying law degrees" are no longer a thing for solicitors I didn't feel the need to go that far and risk confusing the OP.
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BarryScott2022
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#11
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I understand now. Thank you for clarifying.
However ‘qualifying’ law degrees are very much still a thing if you want to enter into some legal professions, in particular barrister route (which I know isn’t relevant for the OP). But, as such Universities still use the term to distinguish between those courses that cover enough detail to exempt some further study, to those that don’t. So the OP will no doubt need to look out for this terminology in their University application sift, if indeed that’s something they want to consider depending on career & firms.

So all that considered, I’d say to the OP, to keep options loosely open, apply for a qualifying LLB law ‘with’ criminology degree rather than just a BA degree (exception being Oxford perhaps).
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evaaa.1
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#12
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(Original post by BarryScott2022)
The OP mentions LLB law with criminology & then a BA later. That’s why I stated if it’s a ‘qualifying’ degree then they will be ok. I effectively went further with an explanation. Did you not feel the need to mention this if you’re giving advice?
Regardless, you do not need a law degree now for SQE, however I did say in practice I’m not sure how this would work.
Thank you. Some of the universities I’ve looked at offer ‘LLB Law with Criminology’, would this be seen as just as good as the single LLB or would the bigger firms (like magic circle) avoid it?
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BarryScott2022
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(Original post by evaaa.1)
Thank you. Some of the universities I’ve looked at offer ‘LLB Law with Criminology’, would this be seen as just as good as the single LLB or would the bigger firms (like magic circle) avoid it?
I honestly can’t be sure, but as I said earlier if it’s an LLB and qualifying (it will state this in the blurb), then there should be no reason why they wouldn’t given they take non law graduates & you’d be doing the SQE anyway. MC are a bit of a funny one, they tend to often take only the best grads from the most prestigious unis because they can. So if you aren’t applying to one of those then it could be a moot point anyway. Someone with a first in LLB L&C isn’t necessarily going to be overlooked by someone with a 2:2 in LLB law but again it depends on the firm & the awarding Uni I should think. It’s not an exact science.

If you think you want a career in law then I personally would stick to a qualifying LLB but I can’t see why that can’t be with a Criminology vein especially if that interests you (we tend to do better in subjects we like!). My understanding is the law bit is the chunk of the degree, & it means your ‘optional modules’ would just be less on an L&C LLB as opposed to a straight LLB Law as some are taken up with core criminology modules. It’s not a dual qualifying degree, your major if you like, is law.

Maybe have a look at Chambers Law to get a feel for graduates from different disciplines.
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17Student17
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The big law firms are making trainees do- a 2 term PGDL with BPP if they do not have a traditional LLB. I would definitely instead go for a normal LLB rather than the one proposed if at all possible or a totally different degree in another subject.
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BarryScott2022
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(Original post by 17Student17)
The big law firms are making trainees do- a 2 term PGDL with BPP if they do not have a traditional LLB. I would definitely instead go for a normal LLB rather than the one proposed if at all possible or a totally different degree in another subject.
I cannot see the point of this if the degree is a qualifying LLB. The mandatory modules are literally exactly the same as a straight LLB, they have to be to be qualifying. The only difference is the optional modules.

Are you saying the firm employs them, then pays for it? I don’t doubt you but would like to see a source for this, just out of interest. Thanks
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BarryScott2022
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So I just looked at the first MC law firm that came into my head - Slaughter & May, and they state that as long as you have covered certain modules in your law degree, which are listed, and appear to be those I mention above, which are mandatory for a qualifying LLB, then there is no requirement to sit PGDL as an addition.

Granted there may be firms who take a different view, but S&M is one of the big 5. It appears the info is easy to find so I’d urge the OP to research.

Nb: just checked Linklaters too & all they ask for is a ‘qualifying law degree’. No mention of ‘straight’ LLB.

HTH the OP, but would still be interested to see evidence to the contrary. Thanks.

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17Student17
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#17
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#17
I haven't look at the criminology degree. Sometimes they are not proper law degrees and don't count. If it does that's fine but they have been rather flavour of the month with people piling into them who would not get a place on an LLB and in my view are easier to get on to and less prestigious even if in some cases they have the core qualifying law subjects.

BA Law Criminology is more of a riskier bet in my view than an LLB.
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BarryScott2022
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#18
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There are LLB qualifying Law & Criminology degrees though as there are LLB Law with Business or French etc. Agree on your point about BA Law unless it’s Oxford. Many of the prestigious universities ask for the same grades A*AA as they do for straight law, so I can’t see how they won’t be held in less regard. They might be slightly less competitive but that’s surely down to application numbers.

At the end of the day if you have a qualifying LLB, it depends on where you study & how well you do in that - if you get a first, you’re in with a good chance, and also to a lesser extent, your A Level grades as these are often considered as part of a TC application, and other things like extra curriculars.

Also bear in mind you can complete the SQE without even having a law degree now. Although as earlier, in practice I’m not sure that’s the best route for certain law positions.

A straight LLB is a good degree but it really isn’t the the only option.
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