pacing back and forth? Psychomotor agitation? Worthy mentioning to therapist?

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skejrjoen
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#1
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#1
Hi
since I was like 10-11 I’ve been pacing. I would do this back and forth in my room in the same direction and path. I would do it secretly and would close the door and fix the curtains so no slits and gaps were there. This was because of a belief that were people spying on me or people seeing me pace.

I would also step very carefully when pacing/pace on my tip toes it just made me feel better and release the energy/agitation I had. But I also would do it because I didn’t want people to hear me or I was nervous of making noise.

I would lose awareness of my surroundings, sometimes I’m immersed in a fictional world while pacing. Most of the time I don’t even realise I’m pacing.

I would do this for hours and would wake up and pace throughout the night. It would get in the way of homework and mess with school since instead of doing work or sleep I would be pacing. So I would be tired in the morning/get in trouble for not doing my homework.

I’m in college and getting treated for low mood and anxiety, I’ve never mentioned this to my therapist or gp because I never saw this as a problem, I still don’t. Do you think I should mention it? What could this be a cause of?
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Phoenixfeather99
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#2
It could be a self-regulation thing. Some people comfort eat, others tap objects or shake their legs and others fiddle.
If you are currently seeing a therapist I would mention it to them, especially as you feel that it is affecting your day-to-day life.
Also, no one here can tell you exactly what the cause of your pacing is, so discussing it with a professional could help you explore reasons behind it in more detail in a safe and supportive environment.
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DarylO
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#3
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(Original post by skejrjoen)
Hi
since I was like 10-11 I’ve been pacing. I would do this back and forth in my room in the same direction and path. I would do it secretly and would close the door and fix the curtains so no slits and gaps were there. This was because of a belief that were people spying on me or people seeing me pace.

I would also step very carefully when pacing/pace on my tip toes it just made me feel better and release the energy/agitation I had. But I also would do it because I didn’t want people to hear me or I was nervous of making noise.

I would lose awareness of my surroundings, sometimes I’m immersed in a fictional world while pacing. Most of the time I don’t even realise I’m pacing.

I would do this for hours and would wake up and pace throughout the night. It would get in the way of homework and mess with school since instead of doing work or sleep I would be pacing. So I would be tired in the morning/get in trouble for not doing my homework.

I’m in college and getting treated for low mood and anxiety, I’ve never mentioned this to my therapist or gp because I never saw this as a problem, I still don’t. Do you think I should mention it? What could this be a cause of?
Tell your therapist. I don't think it's a bad thing. It seems like a coping mechanism but your therapist would like to know about it especially if it could affect your daily activities. There are a bunch of weird things I do that I don't see as issues but they made a huge difference to my treatment plan. It could be the same for you. Who knows?

The one that bothers me more is 'slipping into a fictional world'. I don't know if that would be classified as maladaptive daydreaming. Only your therapist can tell you that. It's something that you should try to reduce so it doesn't interfere so much with your daily tasks. The cause varies for everyone. Usually, it's caused by severe trauma or stress. It's like the conscious mind becomes so overwhelmed that it retreats into a cocoon while your subconscious moves your body around.
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skejrjoen
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#4
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#4
ook so it’s not necessarily a bad thing but still worth mentioning to T?
yeah it’s just something j kinda do lol and I’ve never heard of maladaptive daydreaming before, that’s a thing??
Is it like a form of dissociation because my therapist said I struggle with that
I’ll bring it up next time I got a session or smth
Last edited by skejrjoen; 1 month ago
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