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Which sciences should be included in the curriculum?

WHICH SCIENCES SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THE CURRICULUM?

Currently, there are three sciences that make up the curriculum: chemistry, physics and biology.

Which is your favourite science?
Which is your least favourite science?
Do you think it should be compulsory to take all three sciences at GCSE level or should there be an option like at A-Level? Why?

Post your thoughts below! :biggrin:


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(edited 1 year ago)

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I'd love for some elements of Psychology to be taught within science at KS3.

Trouble is, what do you get rid of to make room?
Interesting debate with sadly too few responses.

I understand my answer is extremely biased, but these are just my opinions, so please do feel free to comment on them.

Chemistry is easily the best science of the lot and is a non-negotiable on the curriculum.

Chemistry is generally recognised as the central science, as it bridges the gaps between many of the various fields of STEM, thus it provides an invaluable insight into how biology works, allowing for advances into medicine to be attained later down the line. This is important, especially in light of the pandemic.

There’s also plenty of practical applications of basic principles in chemistry, including, but not limited to catalysis, which is responsible for a lower demand for energy and lower emissions of toxic gases by industry (including SO2, which makes rain acidic and NO, which causes respiratory problems) and synthesis, which is important for determining how certain materials should be produced for the manufacture of various daily items.

Physics and biology are important too, but I personally feel physics is too fundamental to be as useful as chemistry (it’s useful in select areas like engineering) and that biology isn’t nearly as interesting and is less applicable as it doesn’t branch out quite as much as chemistry.

As for ‘social sciences’ and ‘political sciences’, they should probably be offered as options at GCSE at earliest. I’d imagine they’d be more beneficial to those looking at studying them at A level and beyond and it means not having to fit them into the KS3 curriculum.

In terms of things generally that should be on the curriculum, there should be more life skills lessons, i.e budgeting etc, but that’s a big deviation from the topic.
Original post by 04MR17
I'd love for some elements of Psychology to be taught within science at KS3.

Trouble is, what do you get rid of to make room?


That’s interesting. I also would love to see some elements of psychology to be taught within science at KS3. I did Psychology A-Level and wished I had learnt what I did sooner!
Original post by TypicalNerd
Interesting debate with sadly too few responses.

I understand my answer is extremely biased, but these are just my opinions, so please do feel free to comment on them.

Chemistry is easily the best science of the lot and is a non-negotiable on the curriculum.

Chemistry is generally recognised as the central science, as it bridges the gaps between many of the various fields of STEM, thus it provides an invaluable insight into how biology works, allowing for advances into medicine to be attained later down the line. This is important, especially in light of the pandemic.

There’s also plenty of practical applications of basic principles in chemistry, including, but not limited to catalysis, which is responsible for a lower demand for energy and lower emissions of toxic gases by industry (including SO2, which makes rain acidic and NO, which causes respiratory problems) and synthesis, which is important for determining how certain materials should be produced for the manufacture of various daily items.

Physics and biology are important too, but I personally feel physics is too fundamental to be as useful as chemistry (it’s useful in select areas like engineering) and that biology isn’t nearly as interesting and is less applicable as it doesn’t branch out quite as much as chemistry.

As for ‘social sciences’ and ‘political sciences’, they should probably be offered as options at GCSE at earliest. I’d imagine they’d be more beneficial to those looking at studying them at A level and beyond and it means not having to fit them into the KS3 curriculum.

In terms of things generally that should be on the curriculum, there should be more life skills lessons, i.e budgeting etc, but that’s a big deviation from the topic.

As a current chemistry student at university, I wholeheartedly agree that chemistry is the best science :tongue:

Do you think it should be compulsory to take all three sciences at GCSE level?
Original post by 5hyl33n
As a current chemistry student at university, I wholeheartedly agree that chemistry is the best science :tongue:

Do you think it should be compulsory to take all three sciences at GCSE level?


Agreed, I loved GCSE and A level chemistry.

I think all three should be compulsory. Physics gives you a basic insight into the fundamentals of nature. Obviously chemistry. Biology gives an insight into the human body, plants, etc. GCSEs should be about breadth, to give a basic understanding of the world around us.
Original post by 5hyl33n
As a current chemistry student at university, I wholeheartedly agree that chemistry is the best science :tongue:

Do you think it should be compulsory to take all three sciences at GCSE level?

I’m not entirely sure tbh. To most, it would be completely unnecessary to take all three sciences at GCSE, but considering we need more scientists and innovators to deal with current affairs, it’s worth ensuring that people who look into working in those sorts of career sectors have a broad understanding of the sciences altogether.

Supposing you were to go down the biology pathway without even an ounce of knowledge of GCSE chemistry, a lot of material would be less accessible, or perhaps entirely inaccessible.

I would have loved to take just chemistry and physics at GCSE, ditching biology completely, but at the same time, I recognise that aspects of biology are important to chemistry at uni, so it may actually have been to my detriment should that option have been open.
Original post by 04MR17
I'd love for some elements of Psychology to be taught within science at KS3.

may i ask why?
I think Biology, Chemistry and Physics should be compulsory at gcse, as said before it helps you understand how things work. Each science explorers something different but its all applicable to everything happening around us.
Original post by 04MR17
I'd love for some elements of Psychology to be taught within science at KS3.

Trouble is, what do you get rid of to make room?


Get rid of anything and everything to do with plants :yes:
I think all 3 sciences should continue to be compulsory at GCSE level because as much as I dislike physics, it's interesting and important to understand why things are they way they are and why certain things happen. I also think it's important to do all 3 because aspects of each link together so doing chemistry for example, helps with physics (radiation, astrophysics)
Original post by Jpw1097
Agreed, I loved GCSE and A level chemistry.

I think all three should be compulsory. Physics gives you a basic insight into the fundamentals of nature. Obviously chemistry. Biology gives an insight into the human body, plants, etc. GCSEs should be about breadth, to give a basic understanding of the world around us.


Thanks for sharing your opinion :yy:

Personally, I wouldn’t mind if biology and physics didn’t exist in the curriculum. However, due to other people’s preferences, I agree that all three should be compulsory. Or there should be an option as to which ones you take, if any, like at A-Level.
Original post by TypicalNerd
I’m not entirely sure tbh. To most, it would be completely unnecessary to take all three sciences at GCSE, but considering we need more scientists and innovators to deal with current affairs, it’s worth ensuring that people who look into working in those sorts of career sectors have a broad understanding of the sciences altogether.

Supposing you were to go down the biology pathway without even an ounce of knowledge of GCSE chemistry, a lot of material would be less accessible, or perhaps entirely inaccessible.

I would have loved to take just chemistry and physics at GCSE, ditching biology completely, but at the same time, I recognise that aspects of biology are important to chemistry at uni, so it may actually have been to my detriment should that option have been open.


Exactly. Some of the content does overlap within the sciences and I do think it’s important to have a basic understanding of it all.

Thanks for sharing your opinion :yy:
Original post by 5hyl33n
Personally, I wouldn’t mind if biology and physics didn’t exist in the curriculum. However, due to other people’s preferences, I agree that all three should be compulsory. Or there should be an option as to which ones you take, if any, like at A-Level.

I almost agree with this.

I am only leaning towards yes they should all be taught, but if it came down to the sciences being options subjects, I’d say it should be made compulsory for everyone to study at least one (much like with history/geography in a number of schools)
Original post by randompanda_
I think Biology, Chemistry and Physics should be compulsory at gcse, as said before it helps you understand how things work. Each science explorers something different but its all applicable to everything happening around us.


Thanks for sharing your opinion :yy:

If you had to remove one of the sciences from the curriculum, which one would you pick and why?
Original post by thrivingfrog
Get rid of anything and everything to do with plants :yes:

I would love that! :laugh:
Original post by TypicalNerd
Interesting debate with sadly too few responses.

I understand my answer is extremely biased, but these are just my opinions, so please do feel free to comment on them.

Chemistry is easily the best science of the lot and is a non-negotiable on the curriculum.

Chemistry is generally recognised as the central science, as it bridges the gaps between many of the various fields of STEM, thus it provides an invaluable insight into how biology works, allowing for advances into medicine to be attained later down the line. This is important, especially in light of the pandemic.

There’s also plenty of practical applications of basic principles in chemistry, including, but not limited to catalysis, which is responsible for a lower demand for energy and lower emissions of toxic gases by industry (including SO2, which makes rain acidic and NO, which causes respiratory problems) and synthesis, which is important for determining how certain materials should be produced for the manufacture of various daily items.

Physics and biology are important too, but I personally feel physics is too fundamental to be as useful as chemistry (it’s useful in select areas like engineering) and that biology isn’t nearly as interesting and is less applicable as it doesn’t branch out quite as much as chemistry.

As for ‘social sciences’ and ‘political sciences’, they should probably be offered as options at GCSE at earliest. I’d imagine they’d be more beneficial to those looking at studying them at A level and beyond and it means not having to fit them into the KS3 curriculum.

In terms of things generally that should be on the curriculum, there should be more life skills lessons, i.e budgeting etc, but that’s a big deviation from the topic.


The issue with life skills is that many of them are taught, it's just people pay no attention or forget as they don't need to use these skills for years after they have been taught them.
Nutrition
Original post by SuperGirl3231
The issue with life skills is that many of them are taught, it's just people pay no attention or forget as they don't need to use these skills for years after they have been taught them.

My counterargument to that is that most people won’t use much of/will ignore a lot of the maths, english, science etc they are taught anyway, so they’ll forget that too.

Ultimately it raises the question ‘is there any point in going to school full stop?’.

I do agree it is a problem, but at least teaching life skills means that those who do pay attention will be more able to engage with the real world.
(edited 1 year ago)
I think bio, chem, physics make sense for up to GCSE level as mandatory.

I think other sciences perhaps should be optional modules at best.

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