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Should disabled people be allowed to park on doube yellow lines? watch

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    (Original post by QuantumTheory)
    Yes they are for three hours or less, and it can be a lifesaver, especially if it's near a pharmacy or something and there's no parking.
    They need to make sure they're not parked dangerously though =)

    EDIT: They also don't pay the congestion charge, but the double yellow lines with little perpendicular lines they're not allowed to park on. That's why you see them a lot in pay for car parks.
    where the little perpendicular lines are on the double yellow lines, are where loading bays for lorries etc need space for, er well... loading. Also for those saying disabled people shouldn't drive, most of the time its the passenger who is disabled (and is entitled to the badge) and its their carer or whoever drives.
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    (Original post by Nu Ordah!!!!!!!!!!!!)
    If someone really is truly disabled should they even be driving at all? That is disturbing.

    More disturbing however are 'Parent and Child Spaces'. If you voluntarily breed children you are presumably healthy and well off enough to jolly well walk across the car park. As a result I disregard them at all times and just park in that particular zone.
    Firstly: there are modified cars, automatic cars, and a lot of people use them so people who give them lifts to places can park in a place so they can get to where they need to be easily.

    Secondly: So next time you're alone, pushing a pushchair, trolly, alone, with a toddler running amok and trying to grab sweets from the bag, all the time trying to keep everyone safe off the road, you'll happily walk all the way to the back of the car park? Yeah right.

    Please God stop being so ignorant.
    I'd love to see you try to get around without one if you ever have a real, painful disability.
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    (Original post by goodmen)
    I dont understand why disabled people should get special treatment. I dont want to walk in the rain as much as some one doesnt want to get pushed in a wheel chair in the rain
    Just because they're disabled doesnt mean that they're in a wheelchair. My grandma's disabled and finds walking extremely painful, it's not about walking in the rain, it's about decreasing the distance they have to walk, and making life a little bit easier for them.
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    (Original post by goodmen)
    I dont understand why disabled people should get special treatment. I dont want to walk in the rain as much as some one doesnt want to get pushed in a wheel chair in the rain
    Don't be so ignorant. The whole reason why someone has a blue badge is because they have limited mobility, so may not ]

    There are also those who, due to chronic medical conditions (ashthma, epilepsy), it's best they park near to the entrace of the shop or wherever there's sufficient room should a medical emergency occur.

    (Original post by Nu Ordah!!!!!!!!!!!!)
    If someone really is truly disabled should they even be driving at all? That is disturbing.
    Is it, how?

    You do realise there are a range of disabilities, not all of them are the same. Also, there are stict medical rules to just who can and cannot drive. If a person is not well enough or able to drive then they the DVLA will not let them drive.

    I see no reason why it's particularly disturbing that someone with a disability is allowed to drive. What I do find disturbing is that, during a five minute car journey in a built up area, you're probably going to pass at least two cars that don't have tax or insurance or in which the driver's over the limit. That is disturbing.

    Also, someone can still have a blue badge but not drive. They are still given a blue badge to use in any car in which they are a passenger.
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    I have a couple of partially sighted friends. They are not allowed to drive, even when older, because of their eyesight. They are both too young to drive. I don't understand why they get free bus, train and ferry travel?

    Having said that, I do like it, because when I travel with them, I get free travel as well, saving me alot of money.
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    (Original post by QuantumTheory)
    Firstly: there are modified cars, automatic cars, and a lot of people use them so people who give them lifts to places can park in a place so they can get to where they need to be easily.

    Secondly: So next time you're alone, pushing a pushchair, trolly, alone, with a toddler running amok and trying to grab sweets from the bag, all the time trying to keep everyone safe off the road, you'll happily walk all the way to the back of the car park? Yeah right.

    Please God stop being so ignorant.
    I'd love to see you try to get around without one if you ever have a real, painful disability.
    I accept your first point. But not your second. Children are not forced on people. Either the parents are economically well off and make a choice. Or they are reckless people
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    (Original post by fisherman)
    I don't understand why they get free bus, train and ferry travel?.
    Erm....because they have a disability and therefore can't drive? As a result they are at an instant disadvantage and therefore have to rely on it? Using public transport at full fare can be very expenisve. Many people (but not all) who have disabilities are also on low incomes.

    I'd much rather be able to drive than have a disability and medical condition and have a bus pass. Hopefully, in the next year or two, I will be allowed to drive.

    Also, very few people with disabilities also have free train and ferry travel. Especially elsewhere in the UK.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Erm....because they have a disability and therefore can't drive? As a result they are at an instant disadvantage and therefore have to rely on it? Using public transport at full fare can be very expenisve. Many people (but not all) who have disabilities are also on low incomes.

    I'd much rather be able to drive than have a disability and medical condition and have a bus pass. Hopefully, in the next year or two, I will be allowed to drive.

    Also, very few people with disabilities also have free train and ferry travel. Especially elsewhere in the UK.
    But, as I stated, they are both too young to drive. They have it anywhere in Scotland, not UK wide.
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    (Original post by captainlumpy)
    where the little perpendicular lines are on the double yellow lines, are where loading bays for lorries etc need space for, er well... loading.
    Nope, they're specifically not for loading at ANY time.
    I just checked my Highway Code!
    I remember reading it when my grandma got her blue badge instructions in the post.
    LINK: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAn...ings/index.htm
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    ****'s sake, the amount of idiocy and ignorance in this thread is astonishing.
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    (Original post by Nu Ordah!!!!!!!!!!!!)
    If someone really is truly disabled should they even be driving at all? That is disturbing.

    More disturbing however are 'Parent and Child Spaces'. If you voluntarily breed children you are presumably healthy and well off enough to jolly well walk across the car park. As a result I disregard them at all times and just park in that particular zone.
    This is an extremely naivee statement to make.

    My mother has an adapted mobility car so that she doesn't have to use her legs. She is perfectly safe in a car - So much so, that up until this summer when her condition got worse, she was a driving instructor of 11 years.

    Being disabled doesn't make you an unsafe driver. Thinking it does makes you ignorant.

    Equally, blue badges act for the person. You do not have to hold a driving license to have a blue badge. I can drive my mother into town, we can display her blue badge in my car and use a blue-badge parking space. So, blue badsge holders do not even need to drive - Therefore, you cannot judge them as good, bad or indifferent drivers.
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    (Original post by Nu Ordah!!!!!!!!!!!!)
    I accept your first point. But not your second. Children are not forced on people. Either the parents are economically well off and make a choice. Or they are reckless people
    Thanks!
    But also, even although parents can deal with their children, and have the cash and ability to be good parents, it's tough, and sometimes even the little things can make a big difference.
    Do you ever look after small kids? It can be very draining, even if you love them to bits, your parents'll agree
    Every little (bit of help) helps. If you don't agree with it, when you're a parent, then don't park there, and struggle on!
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    (Original post by tom//)
    has she actually got a disability? or is just because shes old?
    Old people are allowed them too. Just because someone is old it doesn't mean that they can't be disabled and it doesn't make walking any easier. There are strict rules about getting a blue badge - you can't be able to walk more than about 100m.

    My grandma has one. She's 87, can't walk up the road even (she has to use a mobility scooter for that) and when she's in the house she has to use 2 sticks and a stairlift. Her heart is weak (she's had about 4 small heart attacks) and she has arthritis, diabetes, divaticulitis . . . the list goes on.

    Why is she (or any other elderly person in bad health) in less need than a younger person missing a leg or something?

    Edit: As for parking on double yellow lines, they are allowed to so long as it doesn't specify a time e.g. if it says no parking at all times they are allowed to, but if it says no parking between the hours of 8am and 6pm then they aren't allowed to during those times.
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    (Original post by Thud)
    Disabled people aren't allowed to park on double yellow...
    They are with a blue badge, not sure if it's been said.


    With regards to rain, actually it is a difference. If most people get wet, they're wet, unhappy, at the very worst run the risk of a bit of a cold. But most healthy people won't even get that.


    Now my Dad is disabled, if his legs get wet and cold, that can leave him unable to even get out of the house for a couple of weeks - he struggles enough as it is.

    I agree where there is parking they shouldn't be on double yellow lines, but for instance you have to be so far from a junction. And there's a difference of 1 or 2 cars parked up than a whole street solid with cars parked.


    What I can assure you is that you would understand if you were or lived with someone who was disabled, because it is living hell, in my local town you'd be walking at least an extra 1/2 a mile to the city centre from the car park, only that one is usually full, so if you didn't have time to wait, it'd be an extra mile, around. That's ok for a fit healthy person, bad enough for someone who is able bodied but unfit - impossible for someone who struggles to walk at all.


    So yes, they should be allowed. It may inconvenience you, but nowhere near as much as disabled people are inconvenienced, even with the extra "privileges".
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    (Original post by Ekpyrotic)
    You've got a spelling disability, maybe you can park on d. yellows too.
    Other than a few mistakes which were obviously typos, there was nothing wrong with his spelling.

    I don't think they should be allowed to park on double yellows though...that might cause more accidents or something.
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    (Original post by Origami Bullets)
    Her heart is weak (she's had about 4 small heart attacks) and she has arthritis.

    Why is she (or any other elderly person in bad health) in less need than a younger person missing a leg or something?
    im not saying that, i was saying just because someone is old it doesnt or shouldnt entitle them to a badge just for that.

    your grandma shouldnt be driving if shes had 4 heart attacks to be honest, thats just completely selfish
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    ****'s sake, the amount of idiocy and ignorance in this thread is astonishing.
    Although I agree, it's no different to many other threads. You seem particularly enraged?

    No offence to the OP, but as soon as I saw a thread about disabled people and parking spaces I knew the sort of ignorance we'll see. Same happened with the previous two threads.
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    (Original post by River85)
    Although I agree, it's no different to many other threads. You seem particularly enraged?

    No offence to the OP, but as soon as I saw a thread about disabled people and parking spaces I knew the sort of ignorance we'll see. Same happened with the previous two threads.
    Lol my dad has a disabled badge, and idiotic comments like "if someone's disabled should they be driving" are very stupid since he's an excellent driver, and the fact that he has a disability has no relevance to his driving ability :o:
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Lol my dad has a disabled badge, and idiotic comments like "if someone's disabled should they be driving" are very stupid since he's an excellent driver, and the fact that he has a disability has no relevance to his driving ability :o:

    Heh, get the same.

    Ever wish those people would get something that impairs their ability to walk, but so they can still drive? At least temporarily?
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Lol my dad has a disabled badge, and idiotic comments like "if someone's disabled should they be driving" are very stupid since he's an excellent driver, and the fact that he has a disability has no relevance to his driving ability :o:
    Well exactly. There a range of disabilities, with large variations amongst them. Some will affect the ability to drive (in which case the DVLA is alereted) but, in many cases, the ability isn't affected.

    A driver with a disability can be as capable as any other driver. Often more so. Drunk, untaxed and uninsured drivers are a danger.
 
 
 
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