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Should disabled people be allowed to park on doube yellow lines? Watch

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    The convinience of the disabled should not jeopardise the safety of others.
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    (Original post by DavyS)
    I question your point about the funding issue. You claim that it can be expensive for those with disabilities, but those with disabilities get allowance for exactly that reason. To quote the government's website on disability living allowance:

    To me, that is a pretty clear message - for those people who have difficulty in moving around, they get a budget. I realise that life can be particularly hard, especially if you have no particular means of earning an income and have specific (often expensive) necessities that they need to buy. But we don't give those with a lower income lower bus rates - not everything in the country is means tested - and, although I can't claim to know anything about amount of eligibility of the grant that I've brought up, it does seem to me that it exists for the reason of making these sort of things more practical for those who need it.
    Dou even understand why we get that? Unlike you, I actually need some rather expensive equipment and that's what the DLA pays for.

    You really son't understand do you? I didn't choose to be born with brain & visual problems, yet as a result, I need equipment to help me so that I can do every day tasks.

    Also, many of us are excliuded from doing certain jobs. In my case, almost everything.

    I don't see why your travel should be free, and mine not.

    Please note, however, that I'm not trying to turn this into a "You get it so I want it!" paddy, but my logic is that I don't see how a person having disabilities should lead to them having access to free travel, especially considering that I, having the same options, do not.
    Would you like me to poke both your eyes out and see how you manage to get around safely and take care of yourself properly?:mad:
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    (Original post by DavyS)
    To quote the government's website on disability living allowance:



    Disability Living Allowance has two parts called 'components':

    * a care component - if you need help looking after yourself or supervision to keep you safe
    * a mobility component - if you can't walk or need help getting around

    Some people will be entitled to receive just one component; others may get both.

    The care component and mobility component are paid at different rates depending on how your disability affects you.

    To me, that is a pretty clear message - for those people who have difficulty in moving around, they get a budget.
    You know that if you claim free public transport, part of your mobility budget is reduced, don't you?

    Equally, home-to-hospital transport (like dial and ride) is extremely expensive and vital for some people. As is petrol for those who taxi relatives or friends around.

    There's more to the mobility component than black and white.

    Also, because of some lovely loophole rules, some people can't even claim DLA despite being eligible, such as my mother. She has been told that because she left work willingly and not because of failing health (it was actually to care for my sick aunt at the time, and in the time that passed she became too ill to return to work), the government have cleverly deemed that because she didn't leave work because of illness, she's fine to go back to work and shouldn't be claiming DLA, despite her circumstances changing.
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    (Original post by QuantumTheory)
    It bugs me so much when people park in disabled bays who clearly aren't disabled.
    I will admit to parking in disabled bays at Tesco, but only when the car park is practically empty, i.e. in the middle of the night etc - and someone has had a go at me for it! I went mental at them. There were literally about 9 cars in the car park and I only parked there as it is right in front of the shop.

    It's as if this guy thought that disabled people come out at night in mass......:rolleyes:

    I would not do it if it is busy and there are non-disabled bays available.
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    (Original post by DavyS)
    I question your point about the funding issue. You claim that it can be expensive for those with disabilities, but those with disabilities get allowance for exactly that reason. To quote the government's website on disability living allowance:



    Disability Living Allowance has two parts called 'components':

    * a care component - if you need help looking after yourself or supervision to keep you safe
    * a mobility component - if you can't walk or need help getting around

    Some people will be entitled to receive just one component; others may get both.

    The care component and mobility component are paid at different rates depending on how your disability affects you.

    To me, that is a pretty clear message - for those people who have difficulty in moving around, they get a budget. I realise that life can be particularly hard, especially if you have no particular means of earning an income and have specific (often expensive) necessities that they need to buy. But we don't give those with a lower income lower bus rates - not everything in the country is means tested - and, although I can't claim to know anything about amount of eligibility of the grant that I've brought up, it does seem to me that it exists for the reason of making these sort of things more practical for those who need it.
    Nort everybody who is entitled to free bus travel is also entitled to disability living allowance. I'm not but, then again, I'm (or at least my parents) are comfortably off. I'm lucky, however. I know a fair number of people who've been justified in putting in a legitamate claim for DLA but have been refused. It's a very hard thing to claim, even for those win genuine need.

    It's also peanuts and, yes, there's the "living within a budget" issue but that's not so easily done.

    You've also ignored the quality of life issue which is as important.

    (Original post by DavyS)
    And with regards to your last question, if I'm being totally honest, I do somewhat begrudge the level of subsidies on the bus service for elderly people, but that's another discussion for another time
    What, they only get concessionary travel. Up until 2006 they still had to pay, . But then these are people who, in the main, have worked throughout their lives and paid taxes. At least everyone over the age of 60/65 is entitled to free bus travel, regardless of need or income. There's no favouritism. You'll be entitled to it, one day (unless we get Major number two).

    (Original post by DavyS)
    Please note, however, that I'm not trying to turn this into a "You get it so I want it!" paddy.
    Good, because if you did want it then you're quite willing to take my bipolar disorder, dyspraxia and epilepsy.
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    my nana has a blue badge (she has angina, heart problems and had a triple heart bypass back in 2004) which i thought could only be used in the disabled parking spaces. she doesn't drive as much as she used to so my grandad usually takes her places. it was only recently that i found out that the blue badge could let you park on double yellow lines. i personally think that this is ridiculous. even if they are disabled. the yellow lines are there for a reason and if you did park there, you could be blocking a thoroughfare for other drivers. what if two disabled drivers parked on double yellow lines at the same time?
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    It can be dangerous, but until they sort out more disabled spaces and actually monitoring those spaces there is little other option.
    Every time I have been to a supermarket I have seen disabled people forced to park in say the parent and child zone because some **** has parked int eh disabled zone.
    Both these places should be monitored and have heafty fines placed on them, say £200 for parking in parent and child without a child and £400 plus points for parking in a disabled zone with no badge.
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    (Original post by Nu Ordah!!!!!!!!!!!!)
    If someone really is truly disabled should they even be driving at all? That is disturbing.

    More disturbing however are 'Parent and Child Spaces'. If you voluntarily breed children you are presumably healthy and well off enough to jolly well walk across the car park. As a result I disregard them at all times and just park in that particular zone.
    Think thats usually the department store nearby wanting to encourage families to spend money in its tills, rather than the establishment subtly encouraging prolific 'breeding'
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    (Original post by QuantumTheory)
    Nope, they're specifically not for loading at ANY time.
    I just checked my Highway Code!
    I remember reading it when my grandma got her blue badge instructions in the post.
    LINK: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TravelAn...ings/index.htm
    ahhhhh right, I stand corrected
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    (Original post by .grant)
    my nana has a blue badge (she has angina, heart problems and had a triple heart bypass back in 2004) which i thought could only be used in the disabled parking spaces. she doesn't drive as much as she used to so my grandad usually takes her places. it was only recently that i found out that the blue badge could let you park on double yellow lines. i personally think that this is ridiculous. even if they are disabled. the yellow lines are there for a reason and if you did park there, you could be blocking a thoroughfare for other drivers. what if two disabled drivers parked on double yellow lines at the same time?
    Not at all, disabled drivers are required by law to park in a safe place, and if they do park blocking the road, they can be fined like any other driver.
    The double yellow lines are there to let disabled people park there, if they're in that dangerous places, then it'll be a red line, or have the perpendicular lines.
    For lots of disabled people, this option is a lifesaver, and many dont't use it unless they#re in particular agony, or there is no other option.
    Jess
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    (Original post by Nu Ordah!!!!!!!!!!!!)
    If someone really is truly disabled should they even be driving at all? That is disturbing.

    More disturbing however are 'Parent and Child Spaces'. If you voluntarily breed children you are presumably healthy and well off enough to jolly well walk across the car park. As a result I disregard them at all times and just park in that particular zone.
    Just read this one, to be frank you are the type of person I would slam a car door on the head of in vinnie jones lock stock style. An "I don't see the poiont of that rule so I won't obey it" type
    Prehaps it is deemed safer for toddlers and infants to not have to walk across the car park, and for the parents who may struggle with a full trolley and a child not to have to do the same but simply walk to thier car, and to have room for the infant to get in the car and have thier saftey harnesses fastned correctly rather than being squeezed into a car, unable to secure themselves and risking fatality in a crash.
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    Double yellow lines are rarely in places where it actually creates a hazard for other drivers stop there - thats why they are double yellows, and not double reds. A nuisance may be created, certainly, but nothing major.

    To everyone who says "what if the disabled person parks opposite another disabled person and blocks the road?" and "what if the disabled person blocks the road on their own?"

    Well, I will answer your questions, what would happen is the same thing that happens if a non-disabled person parks like that - it blocks the road. Alot of people seem to think that just because they are disabled and can park on double yellows, they instantly lose all ability to drive and park responsibly. Just like a non-disabled driver on a residential street who can park anywhere - will they park opposite another car so that the street is blocked? Of course bloody not!

    Jeez.
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    Just read this one, to be frank you are the type of person I would slam a car door on the head of in vinnie jones lock stock style. An "I don't see the poiont of that rule so I won't obey it" type
    Prehaps it is deemed safer for toddlers and infants to not have to walk across the car park, and for the parents who may struggle with a full trolley and a child not to have to do the same but simply walk to thier car, and to have room for the infant to get in the car and have thier saftey harnesses fastned correctly rather than being squeezed into a car, unable to secure themselves and risking fatality in a crash.


    To be fair, my aunt at 1 point was managing to get a baby and 3 young children (about 2 years apart, so 2, 4 and 6 year olds) safely around without using parent and child spaces - since seeing my Dad struggle to walk more and more, she only uses them if there's a lot of free disabled or parent and child spaces, as she doesn't think she needs them as much as disabled people do. Now if she can do that with 4 young children, the people that only have 1 or 2 children should really find it a doddle in most cases.

    I do think there should be parent and child spaces, but I think disabled should also be able to use them.


    Of course down here, you get the odd able bodied idiot who parks in them, but the worst offenders are actually taxi drivers, the amount you see parked up in them eating lunch and such, it's ridiculous.
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    Most of this thread makes me sad.
    I didn't realise blue badge holders could park on double yellows and so I wouldn't, unless there was literally nowhere else to park and it was somewhere I desperately needed to be. Even then I think I'd only use it to get dropped off then whoever I was with could find a space.
    As for disabled spaces, it makes me really cross when people park in them if they're not disabled. I can't get to the supermarket without my wheelchair and the extra space around disabled spaces is useful. I've been in situations where because there are no spaces my partner has had to hold up traffic in a carpark so he can get me and me wheelchair out of the car before parking in a space he's found because there's not enough room in normal spaces. The same has happened when we've left the carpark.
    At the end of the day I would rather not have a disability and all the so called 'extra rights' (they're aren't any) that go with it then a blue badge. Anyone who thinks someone disabled is getting a better deal then being healthy doesn't have a clue.
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    (Original post by Amykins)
    Most of this thread makes me sad.
    I didn't realise blue badge holders could park on double yellows and so I wouldn't, unless there was literally nowhere else to park and it was somewhere I desperately needed to be. Even then I think I'd only use it to get dropped off then whoever I was with could find a space.


    Hmm I think (hope) most would if pos, but of course like my Dad is the only one in our family who can drive at the moment, so we can't drop him off, and obviously sometimes we can't get/do what's needed.


    As you said though, I don't think anyone would choose a few extra "privileges" over their health.
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    (Original post by GemmyMonster)
    Hmm I think (hope) most would if pos, but of course like my Dad is the only one in our family who can drive at the moment, so we can't drop him off, and obviously sometimes we can't get/do what's needed.


    As you said though, I don't think anyone would choose a few extra "privileges" over their health.
    I meant get put out of the car and moved into the shop, doctors, wherever i was going, then whoever was driving going back and moving the car before coming back. I couldn't just be left, I just be sitting there in my chair.
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    Just read this one, to be frank you are the type of person I would slam a car door on the head of in vinnie jones lock stock style. An "I don't see the poiont of that rule so I won't obey it" type
    Prehaps it is deemed safer for toddlers and infants to not have to walk across the car park, and for the parents who may struggle with a full trolley and a child not to have to do the same but simply walk to thier car, and to have room for the infant to get in the car and have thier saftey harnesses fastned correctly rather than being squeezed into a car, unable to secure themselves and risking fatality in a crash.
    time is money. they nearly always have SUV's anyway. the *******s
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    (Original post by Spotty Dog)
    You know that if you claim free public transport, part of your mobility budget is reduced, don't you?
    This is only true for the motability scheme. I receive low rate mobility but pay zilch for buses. (taxis are a different matter)

    Also, because of some lovely loophole rules, some people can't even claim DLA despite being eligible, such as my mother. She has been told that because she left work willingly and not because of failing health (it was actually to care for my sick aunt at the time, and in the time that passed she became too ill to return to work), the government have cleverly deemed that because she didn't leave work because of illness, she's fine to go back to work and shouldn't be claiming DLA, despite her circumstances changing.
    DLA has nothing to do with someone's employment status. I claimed it earlier this year when I wasn't working or a student and I'm still entitled to it (should be going up soon) and I'm entitled to it now, even though I'm a student.
 
 
 
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